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Full text of "The muscoljuan"

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ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 




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lT|uskirvguTn College 
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The World is not concerned with what you are 
going to do — as to your business or profession, but 
it is tremendously concerned with what you are 
going to be — as to your character and manhood. 
The measure of the man is always the measure of 
his value to the world. 

— J. KNOX MONTGOMERY. 





Foreword 



In this sixteenth volume of the Muscoljuan, 
you will find the best efforts of the class of 
1923. We sincerely hope that these efforts 
have not been in vain. However, we will feel 
that these efforts have been worth while, if the 
contents of this book bring back to those of 
you who read it, fond memories of the school- 
days that are past and thus afford you many 
an hour of entertainment. 

We have attempted to make this book 
truly representative of Muskingum Life. True, 
we are only human and so we realize that this 
production is far from perfect, but we feel that 
it will bring back, to those of you who have 
been Muskingum students, pleasant memories 
of Muskingum and that it will give, to those of 
)een Muskingum students, 
ige Life. 





tEljts atxtmtllj oolunte of i\\t 
is respectfully bebtcateo by ifye (Elass of 1923 to 

professor mxh (Jfflrs. ^Cautim 

frtb.0, through, tfyeir untiring efforts, ttjeir extraordinary ability as 

leabers, anb tfyeir lofmble natures, Jjafre bone such, 

fajonberful foork in bringing ^dflflus. 

ktngum to tb,e front. 



President J. Knox Montgomery 

"A man among men" was the description given 
of our president by one of the leading educators of 
the country. To this characterization every student 
of Muskingum will heartily agree . Wherever he 
goes, his geniality and winsome personality readily 
gain favor for both himself and the cause of the 
college which he so powerfully represents. His kind 
counsel, his wise guidance, his firm purpose, his 
broad and comprehensive outlook — all of these will 
ever remain in the memory of us who have been 
privileged to attend Muskingum during these past 
few years. His inspirational character reflects in- 
deed the real purpose of education, for it permeates 
every phase of collegiate life and enriches the col- 
lege with a gentle and sympathetic humanity that 
touches the life of every student on the campus. To 
know men and women, to arouse in them a desire 
for the higher and nobler things of life, and to 
serve them as a true leader — these are his sole aims 
as the president of Muskingum College. 




X '~'S gg:-r-~" 










Muscoljuan Staff 

Editor-in-Chief James F. Allison 

Associate Editor Philip C. Kyle 

Business Manager Robert M. Giffen 

Associate Business Manager J. Fred Bell 

Literary Editors — 

Helen S. Burns, Lydia M. Steele, Bessie T. Williams 

Joke Editors Mildred A. Miskimen, Donald H. Daughcrty 

Athletic Editor J. Everett McClenahan 

Art Editor — Wendell R. Mintier 

Organization Editor Mildred Keboch 

Music Editor Margaret C. Denison 

Photography Editor Virgil M. Cosby 

Calendar Editors Josephine H. Killough, Virginia Lowther 

Sophomore Representative Charles J. Aiken 




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072 






THE VISION SPLENDID 

"Where there is no vision the people perish." This is equally true of 
institutions." When President Montgomery came to Muskingum College in 
the fall of 1904, the institution was at the parting of the ways. Since that 
time three Colleges in this section of South-Eastern Ohio have ceased to exist, 
viz, West Lafayette, Scio and Franklin. It was evident to the new President 
that Muskingum must either catch up and catch step with the educational pro- 
cession or fall out altogether. It could no longer exist bringing up the rear. 
The first vision had to do with a standard college in the matter of en- 
trance requirements, curriculum, equipment for teaching" science, etc. As a 
result short courses were eliminated, the Ohio College Association entrance 
standards were adopted, new laboratories were equipped, new departments de- 
veloped and the teaching force increasd. The realization of this vision gave 
the college membership in the standardizing agencies, recognition from the 
great educational foundations, accrediting by the State Departments of Edu- 
cation in nearly every commonwealth in the land for teacher certification and 
by the Graduate Schools. 

The second vision had to do with an adequate physical foundation and 
equipment. For sixty-seven years the campus comprised but one acre of land. 
It was manifestly impossible to develop a college on such a physical basis or 
interest men of means in making an investment in a school that was content in 
these days with so small a campus. During the first year of the regime of 
President Montgomery ten acres were added. Since then purchases have been 
made from time to time until now we hav a beautiful campus of about eighty- 
five acres, beautifully located and with a lake covering four acres in its center. 

The next vision had to do with a building program adequate for a grow- 
ing and rapidly developing institution. In 1911 the President had a birdseye 
view prepared showing nine proposed buildings. Most people looked upon 
this as an interesting but impossible vision. But the growth of the college in 
favor, in efficiency and in attendance demonstrated that instead of this vision 
being impossible of realization, it was not big and broad enough. 

As a result the vision on the opposite page is presented as the building 
program for the next ten years, showing twenty-one splendidly appointed 
buildings. Besides these the Girls' Gymnasium, The Barracks Gymnasium 
and the Conservatory of Music buildings do not show on this plan. 

Of these twenty-four buildings Paul Hall was erected in 1874, Johnson 
Hall in 1898 and the Girls' Gymnasium in 1899. Under the present adminis- 
tration there have been erected the President's Manse, Brown Chapel, the 
Power and Light Plant, The Barracks, Montgomery Hall, Four Faculty resi- 
dences, and the central dormitory of the Women's group. The next three 
buildings to be erected are the Library, the Chemistry building and the Stu- 
dent Building, all of which were included in the program of the New World 
Movement. 

When this vision is realized, as it will be, no college in Ohio will have a 
more attractive and beautiful campus than our own loved Muskingum. 






From the Muscoljuan Staff 

The Staff wishes to express thanks to every 
student, alumus, and faculty member, especially to 
Kenneth E. Miller, Uarwin Haynes, Harry Wilson, 
and the Faculty Publication Committee, who so will- 
ingly assisted in getting out the 1923 "Muscoljuan." 
Your interest and enthusiasm were a great incentive 
to us to put forth great efforts to turn out the best 
annual possible. 




••:JJJi%:'" •' 



Table of Contents 



BOOK I COLLEGE 

BOOK II STUDENTS 

BOOK III MUSIC 

BOOK IV LITERARY 

BOOK V ORGANIZATIONS 

BOOK VI ORATORY 

BOOK VII ___ ATHLETICS 
BOOK VIII— CAMPUSTRY 










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Board of Trustees 

Officers 

Rev. M. A. Eakin. D. D. President 

T. Dale Kyle, Esq. Vice President 

Rev. W. J. Grimes, D. D. Secretary 

Hon. L. J. Graham Treasurer (Permanent funds) 

E. A. Montgomery Treasurer (Current and building funds) 

Term Expires 1922 

Rev. W. J. Grimes, D. D. New Concord, O. 

Rev. L. I. Gray Northfield, O. 

Rev. S. E. Martin, D. D Akron, O. 

Rev. J. C. Smith Cambridge, O. 

Robert McGowan, Esq. Steubenvlile, O. 

Fred Sebring, Esq. Sebring, O. 

Rev. Fred Elliott Mansfield, O. 

L. B. Peterson, M. D. Steubenville, O. 

Term Expires 1923 

Rev. W. P. Aiken, D. D. Canonsburg, Pa. 

T. Daie Kyle, Esq. Xenia, O. 

J. H. McCall, Esq Cleveland, O. 

W. P. Sharer Cleveland, O. 

E. B. Castor, Esq. New Concord, O. 

Rev. J. H. Spencer Wooster, O. 

D. M. Ogilvie, Esq. East Liverpool, O. 

Earl A. Montgomery, Esq. New Concord, O. 

Thomas Pyles, Esq. Cambridge, O. 

Term Expires 1924 

Rev. Mertz A. Eakin, D. D. Steubenville, O. 

Rev. O. H. Milligan, D. D. Ben Avon, Pa. 

Rev. J. I. Moore Zanesville, O. 

W. B. Bateman Zanesville, O. 

Hon. C. Ellis Moore Cambridge, O. 

W. D. Culbertson New Concord, O. 

S. H. Maharry, Esq Wellston, O. 

J. E. McGowan Steubenville, O. 

Rev. Ira F. Leeper St. Clairsville, O. 









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Book I — College 



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ALUMNI 



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Pittsburgh- Muskingum Alumni Association 



President 

Vice President . . 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



. W. E. Bothwell 
— J. J. Mcllvaine 
. Nelle B. Moore 
Robert Campbell 



M. M. Allison 312 44th St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Bess Laing 312 44th St., Pittsbrugh, Pa. 

Isabella Adams Miffintown, Pa. 

S. Irwine Acheson . . 616 W. North Ave., Pittsburgh 

Grace R. Alexander Cedar Ave., Oberlin, O. 

Ross Allen Thomas, Pa. 

Milton Alter Parnassus, Pa. 

N. J. Atkinson Ingram, Pa. 

W. P. Aiken Canonsburg, Pa. 

A. W. Anderson Woodlawn, Pa. 

Earl Bothwell . . 2120 Perrysville Ave., Pittsburgh 
Margaret Bothwell 2120 Perrysville Ave., Pittsburgh 

G. S. Brooks McDonald, Pa. 

W. T. Brownlee Ben Avon, Pa. 

Mrs. Alta Buard McKeesport, Pa. 

J. B. Brown 616 W. North Ave, Pittsburgh 

Madge Brown Zanesville, O. 

Katherine Bradley.. 241 N. Dithridge St., Pittsburgh 

Frances Bowman Swissvale, Pa. 

T. M. Buck Elizabeth, Pa. 

Elsie McDill Buck Elizabeth, Pa. 

Esther Bradley, 20 Century Club, Biglow Blvd., Pgh. 
John Bolton.. Termon Ave. N. S., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Wm. Birkett Midway, Pa. 

C. Arthur Coltman...51 Chestnut St., Crafton, Pa. 

T. B. Cain McKeesport, Pa. 

Lillian McCurdy Cain McKeesport, Pa. 

S. B. Copeland New Castle, Pa. 

Margaret Wilson Copeland New Castle, Pa. 

Ralph E. Carson, 2435 Perrysville Ave., ... S., Pgh. 
Glenna Miller Carson, 2433PerrysvilleAve. N.S., Pgh. 

Lucille McClenahan Camp Bellevue, Pa. 

Robt. A. Campbell. .616 W. North Ave., N. S., Pgh. 
Prof. John Coleman, College Hill, Beaver Falls, Pa. 
Mrs. John Coleman, College Hill, Beaver Falls, Pa. 

L. D. Copeland Aspinwall, Pa. 

Margiret Lawrence Copeland Aspinwall, Pa. 

Jane Carlisle Hickory, Pa. 

Blanche Cooper Hickory, Pa. 

John Cowan Oakmont, Pa. 

J. L. Cockins Canonsburg, Pa. 

J. W. Chisholm 606 Shary Ave., Mt. Lebanon 

J. A. Cosby Elwood City, Pa. 

Lucille Cosby Wellsville, O. 

Elizabeth Cleland Oakdale, Pa. 

W. II. Cogley Kittaning, Pa. 

Edith Cummings Houston, Pa. 

Ray Copeland Bulger, Pa. 

Bruce Campbell Woodlawn, Pa. 

Clara Campbell Steubenville, (). 

Frank Doutt Rochester, Pa. 

Ella Thompson Doutt Rochester, Pa. 

Elizabeth Dickson Midway, Pa. 

II. P. Downie Freeport, I'm. 

Mrs. H. P. Downie Freeport. Pa. 

CI. iik Davis New Florence, Pa. 

E. P. Douglass Mt. Lebanon, Pa, 



Mrs. B. G. Elliott Butler, Pa. 

Marie Funk Irwing, Pa. 

D. H. Funk Irwin, Pa. 

S. J. Fullwood Ingram, Pa. 

Anna Fulton 901 South Ave., Wilkinsburg 

John Frazier 405 Colonial Apt., Wilkinsburg 

Bertha Allison Frazier. . Colonial Apt., Wilkinsburg 

Jennie Forsythe Crafton, Pa. 

Frank Fulton Homestead, Pa. 

C. N. Fulton. . .California & Davis Ave., Pittsburgh 

W. K. Fulton Swissvale, Pa. 

Dr. W. L. Fleming Buchannon, W. Va. 

Alice Fulton St. Clairsville, O. 

J. H. Gregg Crafton, Pa. 

Nellie Richie Gregg Crafton, Pa. 

Robert Gibson Springdale, Pa. 

Helen Mitchell Gibson Springdale, Pa. 

Dwight Gillespie . . . 616 W. North Ave., Pittsburgh 

Carl Gaston Andrews Place, E. Liverpool, O. 

L. E. Gillespie Brownsville, Pa. 

Emma Giffen St. Clairsville, O. 

Marie Gordon St. Clairsville, O. 

Margaret Hart Salineville, O. 

Mrs. J. R. Hosick Grove City, Pa. 

Nettie Hoover Tarentum, Pa. 

Myrtle Johnson St. Clairsville, O. 

Richard B. Johnson, 616 W. North Ave., Pittsburgh 

John H. Jamison Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

Dwight Jeffries Rea, Pa. 

Mary Junk Vanderbilt, Pa. 

Margaret Kelso MacDonald, Pa. 

Mack Kelso MacDonald, Pa. 

R. E. Kidd Kendall Ave., Bellevue, Pa. 

Mrs. R. E. Kidd Kendall Ave., Bellevue, Pa. 

Harry Kerr. . 309 E. Wheeling St. Washington, Pa. 

Jos. Krohn Worthington, Pa. 

Ralph Kernaught Washington, Pa. 

Lillias Laiug Gibsonia, Pa. 

Sam'l. P. Laing Gibsonia, Pa. 

Homer Lowry Elizabeth, Pa. 

II. Howard Lee, 503 Beechwood Ave., Carnegie, Pa. 
J. R. Linsenmeyer, 1019 Chartiers Ave., N. E., Pgh. 
Mrs. J. R. Linsenmeyer. . . . (same) Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Frank Lunsford Riverside Ave., Wellsville 

Earl Liggett Mt. Washington, 

AH. Laing Rea, 

O. C. Liggett Grove City, 

Wilma Mintier St. Clairsville 

J. S. Martin Dormont, 



O. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Pa. 
O. 

Pa. 

C. K. McGeorge Corapolis, Pa. 

Mrs. C. K. McGeorge Coraopolis, Pa. 

J. T. Miller, 240 Lafayette Ave., X. S., Pittsburgh 
Mrs. J. T. Miller, 240 Lafayette Ave., N. S., Pgh. 
Nelle B. Moore, 2236 Perrysville Ave., N. S., Pgh. 
R. J. Miller, 1707 lluena Vista St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Mrs. K. }. Miller, 1707 Buena Vista St., Pittsburgh 
O. II. Milligan 805 Taylor Ave., Avalon, Pa. 



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0923 



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Mrs. O. H. Milligan, 805 Taylor Ave., Avalon, Pa. 
Mrs. D. A. McClenahan, 514 Dawson Ave., Bellevue 
H .C. Martin. . 132 Watson Blvd., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
W. R. McGeary. . . .616 W. North Ave., Pittsburgh 
Carrie McGeary .... 616 W. North Ave., Pittsburgh 
Martha McCorkle.... 536 Roup St., Tarentum, Pa. 

Nettie McBride Steubenville, O. 

Sara Miller .... 2437 Maple Ave., N. S., Pittsburg 

Ida McCreery Swissvale, Pa. 

Don Montgomery Harrisville, Pa. 

Anna Thompson Montgomery Harrisville, Pa. 

Alberta McBride Corliss Sta., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Jos. A. Mears...2215 Holyoke St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
L. M. Miller .... 240 Lafayette Ave., N. S., Pgh. 

Porter Miller Charlocta, Pa. 

D. C. McCoy Murdocksville, Pa. 

Bessie Watt McCoy Murdocksville, Pa. 

J. J. Mcllcaine Ben Avon, Pa. 

Mary McNary Thomas, Pa. 

Chas. McNary Y. M. C. A., Pittsburg 

J. R. Moore Woodlaw, Pa. 

J. Howard Maxwell Beaver, Pa. 

Annie B. McClurg Crafton, Pa. 

R. S. Miller Mt. Lebanon, Pa. 

J. S. Martin Dormont, Pa. 

J. C. McConaughey Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

J. L. McConaughey .... 928 Frick Building, Pgh. 

Paul Moore Woodlawn, Pa. 

Curtis McNary Canonsburg, Pa. 

J. C. Morrow Knoxville, Pa. 

Clark McKenzie Burgettstown, Pa. 

Merle McKenzie Burgettstown, Pa. 

W. J. Martin Braddock, Pa. 

Ira J. McCreary Aspinwall, Pa. 

Ralph Mansfield Wheeling, W. Va. 

Helen Morton Mansfield Wheeling, W. Va. 

J. Ralph Neale New Wilmigton, Pa. 

Edith Patton Neale New Wilmington, Pa. 

Margaret Nesbit Wheeling, W. Va. 

Charles Nash East Liverpool, O. 

Mary Helen Ogilvie East Liverpool, O. 

Mary Patterson Velentia, Pa., R. D. 1 

G. R. Patterson Illinois, Ave., Pgh. 

Hazel Pollock Bellevue, Pa. 

Robert H. Pollock Bellevue, Pa. 

Fred C. Patterson N. S., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Mrs. Fred C. Patterson N. S., Pittsbrugh, Pa. 

L. F. Patterson Library, Pa. 

Ethel Peterson East Palestine, O. 

W. S. Robb 2321 Osgood St., N. S., Pgh. 

Mrs. W. S. Robb.... 2321 Osgood St., N. S., Pgh. 

II. P. Rose New Wilmington, Pa. 

Mrs. H. P. Rose New Wilmington, Pa. 

Myrtle Reed Canonsburg, Pa. 

Ethel Reed Canonsburg, Pa. 

Pearl Rice 817 Anaheim St., Pittsbrugh, Pa. 



W. V. Ritchie Taylorstown, Pa. 

Lillian Rogers Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

E. R. Russell Washington, Pa. 

Claire Reed Russell Washington, Pa. 

D. L. Rees 7001 Jenkins Arcade, Pgh., Pa. 

Elizabeth Robinson Kittanning, Pa. 

Melvin Riddle New Florence, Pa. 

Wm. Rotzler New Brighton, Pa. 

John Stoner eVrona, Pa., R. D. 1 

H. P. Smith Woodlawn, Pa. 

Ruth St. Clair . . 1924 Perrysville Ave., N. S., Pgh. 

Roland Swank New Kensington, Pa. 

Edith Simpson Hickory Pa. 

Marshal Skillen . . . McCullough's Drug Store, Pgh. 

J. I. Stewart Ambridge, Pa. 

Viola Scott Grove City, Pa. 

Wren Shearer New Brighton, Pa. 

Elizabeth Stewart Ben Avoh, Pa. 

Howard Smiley Rochester, Pa. 

R. M. Thompson Rea, Pa. 

S. Gordon Thompson Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

Mrs. J. A. Trotter East Liverpool, O. 

R. L. Thompson Conton, O. 

Ralph Thomas Aspinwall, Pa. 

Ross Trace Woodlawn, Pa. 

J. f. Vorhis 616 W. North Ave., Pgh. 

Karl Vitter Verona, Pa. 

W. W. Willis Irwin, Pa. 

Sarah Welch Oakmont, Pa. 

Wm. Wallace Freeport, Pa. 

Elizabeth Wishart 1901 Termon Ave., Pgh. 

Agnes Wishart 1901 Termon Ave., Pgh., Pa. 

Wilda Warner East Liverpool, O. 

W. L. Wishart Unity Station, Pa. 

Sara Beggs Wishart Unity Station, Pa. 

F. P. Matthews Wilmerding, Pa. 

Mrs. F. P. Matthews Wilmerding, Pa. 

Mrs. F. P. Matthews Wilmerding, Pa. 

Elsie Wilson Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

Janet Wilson 7307 Edlewild St., Pgh. 

W. I. Wishart... 2333 Perrysville Ave., Pittsburgh 
Mrs. W. I. Wishart... 2333 Perrysville Ave., Pgh. 

Iva White 1400 Creedmoor St., Pittsburgh 

Julian White 1400 Creedmoor St., Pittsburgh 

J. H. White 1400 Creedmoor St., Pittsburgh 

W. T. Wilson 31 N. Emily St., Crafton, Pa. 

Betty Wilson 5443 Penn Ave., Pittsburgh 

J. Fulton Wilson Bellevue, Pittsburgh 

Edw. Welch Hookstown, Pa. 

Mary White Welch Hookstown, Pa. 

Wylie Woodburn Claysville, Pa. 

Robt. Wilson Ben Avon, Pa. 

Mary Belle Welch Wilkinsburgh, Pa. 

Prof. A. H. Wright Washnigton, Pa. 

Mrs. A. H. Wright Washington, Pa. 



[ 29] 



j£ 



Muskingum-Columbus Alumni Association 



Mr. W. J. Clark 
Mrs. Sara Baggs 



President 

Secretary 



Adams, Chas. M.,.,22 E. '2nd Ave., Columbus, O. 
Adams, Mrs. Chas. M., 22 E. 2nd Ave., Columbus, O. 

Alexander, Mrs 693 Kimball PI., Columbus, O. 

Alley, W. Boyd... 60 Smith Place, Columbus, O. 

Alley, Mary 60 Smith Place, Columbus, O. 

Alley, Mrs 60 Smith Place, Columbus, O. 

Albright, Elroy S. . .167 W. 10th Ave., Columbus, O. 
Amspoker, Mr. Walter, 743 Neil Ave., Columbus, O. 
Amspoker, Mrs. Walter, 743 Neil Ave., Columbus. 
Amspoker, Mr. Leo . . 497 Kimball Place, Columbus. 
Amspoker, Mrs. Leo, 497 Kimball Place, Columbus. 

Archer, Vernon Ill W. 11th Ave., Columbus 

Baggs, Sara M 329 19th Ave., Columbus 

Blake, Josephine 96 W. 9th Ave., Columbus 

Blackwood, Dr. A. W., E. Trambers, Columbus, O. 
Blackwood, Mrs. A. W., E. Trambers, Columbus, O. 

Bonnell, Dr. George Worthington, O. 

Bonnell, Mrs. George Worthington, O. 

Bennett, Mr. R. B Westerville, O. 

Bennett, Mrs. (Louise Martin) .... Westerville, O. 

Brindley, T. F., 329 12th Ave., Columbus, O. 

Brindley, Mrs 329 12th Ave., Columbus, O. 

Brindley, Miss Lela . . 329 12th Ave., Columbus, O. 
Brindley, Miss Mabel, 329 12th Ave., Columbus, O. 
Brindley, Mr. A. V., 747 Neil Ave., Columbus, O. 
Brindley, Mrs. (Mary Ramsey) 747 Neil Ave., Col. 

Brindley, Janet 747 Neil Ave., Columbus, O. 

Byrns, Mrs. E. L., 2055 Waldeck Ave., Columbus, O. 
Cisco, Miss Bess, 30 Berkley Place, Columbus, O. 
Clark, Walter J., 432 W. 6th Ave., Columbus, O. 
Clark, Mrs. Walter J., 432 W. 6th Ave., Columbus. 
Clark, Mrs. Walter J., 432 W. 6th Ave., Columbus. 
Clark, Mrs. M. G., 432 W. 6th Ave., Columbus, O. 
Cowden, Dr. Harry S., Long and 9th Sts. , Columbus. 
Chalfant, Harry,.. 167 W. 10th Ave., Columbus, O. 

Davis, James E. 137 12th Ave., Columbus, O. 

Danson, W. O.,. . . . 1354 N. 4th St., Columbus, O. 

Danson, W. 1354 N. 4th St., Columbus, O. 

DeVore, Maud Anna, 400 W. 7th Ave., Columbus, O. 

Evans, E. E Reynoldsburg, O. 

Evans, Gordon Reynoldsburg, O. 

Evans, David E Reynoldsburg, O. 

Evans, Edith A Reynoldsburg, O. 

Ebright, Mrs. Geo. W., Champion & Rich, Columbus. 

Eagleson, Freeman T Columbus, O. 

Eagleson, Mrs. Freeman Columbus, O. 

Ervin, Ralph 1436 Hamlet St., Columbus, O. 

Fulton, Walter E., 500 Hamilton Ave., Columbus, O. 
Florette, Mr. II. M., 1436 Hamlet St., Columbus, O. 
Florette, Mrs. H. N., 1436 Hamlet St., Columbus, O. 
Gardiner, Kelley, 250 W. 10th Ave., Columbus, O. 

Graham, Mr. A. L., Linden, Columbus, O. 

Graham, Mrs. A. L Linden, Columbus, O. 

Graham, Paul Reynoldsburg, O. 

Graham, Abner Reynoldsburg, O. 

Graham, W. P 587 E. Spring St., Columbus, O. 

Guerin, Dwight D., 1354 N. 4th St., Columbus, O. 

Hastings, Dr. A. G Reynoldsburg, O. 

Hastings, Mrs. A. G Reynoldsburg, O. 

Hastings, Edna O Reynoldsburg, O. 

Ilannum, Mrs. Marshall, 414 12th Ave., Columbus. 
Ilannum, William J., 26 E. Patterson Ave., Columbus 
Ilazlett ,Ross R., 1187 Wyandotte Rd., Columbus, O. 
Hazlett, Mrs. Ross R., 1187 Wyandotte Rd., Col., O. 
lleenan, Mrs. A. T., 1301 Franklin Ave., Columbus 
Ilinkle, Carl P., 26 E. Paterson Ave., Columbus, O. 

lleaton, Otto B Riverside Drive, Columbus, O. 

Heaton, Mrs. Otto B., Riverside Drive, Columbus, O. 

Jewell, R. M Mt. Vernon, Columbus, O. 

Kirk, Mrs. R. A 141 15th Ave., Columbus, O. 

Knight, Anise 30] W 5th Ave., Columbus, O. 

Kirkpatrick, Mr. F. E., 152 12th Ave., Columbus, O. 
Kirkpatrick, Mrs. F. E., 152 12th Ave., Columbus. 

Kyle, Lois 1430 Neil Ave., Columbus, O. 

I.eech, Nina,. . . . 418 S. Warren Ave., Columbus, O. 
Livingston, Miss Lee Columbus, O. 



Livingston, R. II., Station B., Rt. 2, Columbus, O. 

Livingston, Wilmer Columbus, O. 

Livingston, Mrs. Wilmer Columbus, O. 

Lunn, Miss Esta M Reynoldsburg, O. 

Lytle, Mrs. J. Paul Reynoldsburg, O. 

Marguis, H. E Lancaster, O. 

McBurney, J. D 137 12th Ave., Columbus, O. 

McCall, Vernon B Reynoldsburg, O. 

McCall, Mrs. (Gracie Evans) .... Reynoldsburg, O. 
McCormick, Robert D., 161 W. 10th Ave., Columbus. 
McCullough, L. P., 22 W. Gay St., Columbus, O. 
Moore, Chas. T., 505 Linwood Ave., Columbus, O. 
Moore, Mrs. Chas. T., 505 Linwood Ave., Columbus. 
Moore, Kenneth, 505 Linwood Ave., Columbus, O. 
Moore, Walter, 505 Linwood Ave., Columbus, O. 
Moore, Mr. J. E., 365 Morrison Ave., Columbus, O. 
Moore, Mrs. J. E., 365 Morrison Ave., Columbus, O. 
Miller, Miss Lillion, 292 S. Champion Ave., Col., O. 

Mitchell, T. Moffat 46 18th Ave., Columbus, O. 

McConagha, Mrs. Sarah, 329 19th Ave., Columbus. 
McConagha, R. A., 329 19th Ave., Columbus, O. 
McConagha, Dr. A. B., 39 13th Ave., Columbus, O. 
McConagha, Mrs. (Harriet Milligan) (same) Col., O. 
McClure, Rev. Walter E., 234 Jefferson Ave., Col., O. 

McClure, Mrs. Walter E (same) Columbus, O. 

McLaughlin, Howard B., 152 W. Woodruff, Col., O. 
Painter, Mr. V. S., 920 Miller Ave., Columbus, O. 
Painter, Mrs. (Getrtrude King) (same) Columbus, O. 
Patton, Mrs. R. B., 174 N. Monroe Ave., Columbus. 
Patton, Robert D., 174 N. Monroe Ave., Columbus. 
Pugh, Rev. Robert E., 196 13th Ave., Columbus, O. 
Pugh, Mrs. Robert E., 196 13th Ave., Columbus, O. 
Pugh, Robert E., Jr., 196 13th Ave., Columbus, O. 
Pope, Mr. E. C.,.. 206 Wilbur Ave., Columbus, O. 
Pope, Mrs. (Gertrude Chalfant) (same) Columbus, O. 
Roberts, J. Clifford, 154 E. Woodruff Ave., Columbus 
Robinson, Chas. E., 12 E. Lane Ave., Columbus, O. 
Roche, Wm. C, 111 W 11th Ave., Columbus, O. 

Romans, Dr., 1832 Summit St., Columbus, O. 

Romans, Mrs. Viola D., 1832 Summit St., Columbus. 

Richmond, Mary Thornville, O. 

Sebring, B. W 197 13th Ave., Columbus, O. 

Sebring, B. W 197 13th Ave., Columbus, O. 

Shaw, Loren P.,. . 244 W. 10th Ave., Co'umbus, O. 

Shepherd, J. R Station B., Rt. 2, Columbus, ' ,\ 

Shepherd, Mrs. (Mary Hinkle) (same) Columbus, O." 

Shiffer, Carl Gahanna, O. 

Shifter, Mrs. Carl Gahauna, O. 

Stewart, H. Brown, 79 W. Starr \ve., Columl.-'UL, O. 
Thomas, J. A...... 2216 Summit St., Columbus, O. 

'IhO'.ias, Mrs. J. A., 2216 Summit St., Columbus. O. 

Thomas, Paul 182 Crestview Rd., Columbus, O. 

Thomas, Mrs. Paul, 182 Crestview Rd., Columbus, O. 

Thompson, M. B 129 King Ave., Columbus, O. 

Thompson, Mrs. M. B., 129 King Ave., Columbus, O. 
Thompson, Dr. W. O., O. S. U Campus, Columbus. 
Truax, Mrs. Ida L., 92 Linwood Ave., Columbus, O. 
250 12th Ave., Columbus, O. 

. . 46 18th Ave., Columbus, O. 

1051 Miller .rvve., Columbus, O. 
1051 Miller Ave., Columbus, O. 

1491 Dublin Rd., Columbus, O. 
White, Mrs. Homer, 1491 Dublin Rd., Columbus, O. 
White, Margaret L., 1491 Dublin Rd., Columbus, O. 

White, John 1491 Dublin Rd., Columbus, O. 

White, Mr. I. E., 370 Brevoort Rd., Columbus, O. 
White, Mrs. I. E., 370 Brevoort Rd., Columbus, O. 
White, Earl Leland, 370 Brevoort Rd., Columbus, O. 

White, Jas. A 44 12th Ave., Columbus, O. 

White, Mrs. Jas. A.,.. 44 12th Ave., Columbus, O. 

White, Hhos." A 44 12th Ave., Columbus, O. 

Wilson, Mrs. Zula, 301 W. 5th Ave., 
Wilson, Pauline,... 301 W. 5th Ave. 



Weber, William L., 
White, T. Corwin,. 
White, Fred R., 
White, Mrs. Fred R.. 
White, Mr. Homer, 



Columbus, O. 
Columbus, O. 



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Wilson, Virginia,.. 301 W. 5th Ave., Columbus, O. 

Ure, Herbert 34 S. Ohio Ave., Columbus, O. 

Ure, Mrs. Herbert, 34 S. Ohio Ave., Columbus, O. 



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FACULTY 

Just how much those words "The Faculty" mean to us is per- 
haps determined by our various class standings, by our associa- 
tion with the "powers that be" in our school life, or perhaps 
merely thru having heard some other individual's opinion of our 
various professors. However that may be, we are glad that the 
Muskingum professors are ours, and not those of some other col- 
lege. Altho some of them have a long list of degrees following 
their names, and some can talk by the hour of things of which 
we've never heard, we are certain of the fact that from the "least 
even to the greatest" of them we can call them our friends. We 
of the Muskingum "family" have reason to be proud of the great 
advance our Alma Mater has made in the improvements of her 
buildings and the increase in the number of students ; but we are 
even prouder that our Faculty has not been marking time, for we 
are sure that no more efficient group of educators exists in any 
college such as ours. Granted that their opinions and ours quite 
often conflict, we can not hold that against them and are willing 
to admit that we can learn much from those under whose in- 
struction we are now becoming what we are to be. 



Estella McCartney 

Teacher of Pianoforte and Musi- 
cal Kindergarten, Muskingum Con- 
servatory, Cambridge, Ohio. 

George Anderson Brown 
A. B. Thiel College; Graduate of 
Pittsburgh Seminary; Instructor in 
Bible. Muskingum, 1932. 

Treasure Tomlinson Johnston 

Graduate of Muskingum Conscrv- 
tory of Music, 1920; Instructor in 
Piano, Muskingum College, 1921. 



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J. Knox Montgomery, D. D. 
President 
Indana State University; Graduate 
Xenia Theoogical Seminary, 1887; 
D. D.. Sterling College, 1904; Pres- 
ident, Muskingum College, 1904. 



Hugh Alexander Kelsey, A.B.,D.D. 

Vice-President 
A. B., Tarkio College, 1898; Grad- 
uate Xenia Theological Seminary, 
1903; D. D. Muskingum College, 
1916; Professor of Bible, Musking- 
um, 1919. 



Thomas Hosack Paden, A.M., Ph.D. 

Professor Emeritus 
A. B„ Muskingum College, 18?:; ; A. 
M., 1876; Ph. D., 1912; Student San 
Francisco Theological Seminary, 
1876-1877; Instructor in Latin, Mus- 
kingum College, 1870, 1871; Profes- 
sor of Ancient Languages, 1877- 
1895; Professor of Latin and Politi- 
cal Science, 1895-1915; Professor of 
Latin. 1915-1921. 



John Scott Cleland, A. M.. Ph. I). 

Dean of College 
A. B., Muskingum, 1908; A. M., 
Princeton, 1909; Ph. D., University 
jf Pittsburg, 1914; Professor of 
F.conomics and Business Adminis- 
tration, Muskingum, 1920. 




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Edith J. Morton 

Dean of Women 
Graduate of Washington State 
Normal School; Student, Geneva 
College; Student, University of 
Washington; Dean of Women and 
Instructor in English and Psychol- 
ogy, Muskingum, 1921. 



Earl A. Montgomery 
Current Expense Treasurer 
District Assessor, Muskingum 
County, Ohio, 1914-1015; County 
Auditor, 1915-1919; Cashier, First 
National Bank, New Concord, 
Ohio, 1919; Current Expenses 
Treasurer, Muskingum College, 
1921. 



Hon. Leonard Johnson Graham, 

A. M. 

Endoivmenf Treasurer 

A. B., Muskingum, 1887; A. M., 
Muskingum, 1890; Graduate Stu- 
dent, Ohio State University, Har- 
vard University; Professor of Eng- 
lish Literature, Muskingum, 1890- 
1916; member of Ohio Legislature, 
1917; Treasurer of Muskingum Col- 
lege, 1890-1921; Endowment treas- 
urer, Muskingum College, 1921. 



John Glenn Lowery, M. S., M. A. 

Dean of Education 
B. S., Muskingum, 1907; M. S., 
Muskingum, 1912; M. A., University 
of Chicago, 1917; Professor of Edu- 
cation, Muskingum College, 1914- 
1918; Dean of Education, Mnsking- 
umi College, 1918. 



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George Boon McCreary, A.M., Ph.D. 

Registrar 
A. B., Muskingum, 1895; Graduate 
jf Pittsburg Theological Seminary, 
1908; University of Chicago, 1901; 
A. M., Muskingum, 1902; Ph. D., 
Grove City, 1914; Registrar and 
Professor of Greek and Philosophy, 
Muskingum College, 1917. 



Charles Rush Layton, A. M. 
Dean of Oratory 
A. B., Otterbein College, 1913; A. 
M., University of Michigan, 1917; 
Professor of Oratory, Muskingum, 
1914-1920; Dean of Oratory, Mus- 
kineum, 1920. 



Fern Parsons Laton, B. O. 
Associate Professor of Orctory 
B.O., Mt. Union Scio College, 1909; 
Student Oberlin and Otterbein, 
1910-1913; Student, University of 
Michigan, 1916-1917; Instructor in 
Physical Education, Muskingum, 
1914-1919: Instructor in Oratory, 
Muskingum, 1915. 



Ermy Hahn Tackson, A. B. 

Instructor in Public Speaking 
A. B., Muskingum College, 1921; 
Tau Kappa Alpha, Debate and Ora- 
tory Fraternity, 1920; Instructor in 
Public Speaking, Muskingum Col- 
lege, 1921. 





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Mary E. Sharp, M. A. 
Professor of Modem Languages 
A. B., Westminster College, 1902; 
A. M., Westminster, 1905; M. A., 
Columbia University, 1921; Studied 
in Germany, 1910; Professor of 
Modern Languages, Muskingum, 
1906. 



Anna M. Rentsch, A. B 
Assistant Professor of Modern 
Languages 
A. B., University of Pittsburgh, 
1908; Graduate Work, Wisconsin 
University; Assistant Professor of 
Modern Languages, Muskingum, 
1919. 



Elsie Ruth Downing, A. B. 
Instructor in French 
A. B., Muskingum, 1920; Instructor 
in French, Muskingum, 1920. 



Lillian Ruth Frf.tts, A. B. 
Instructor in German and English 
Muskingum College, 1914-1916; A. 
B., Ohio Wesleyan, 1919; Instructor 
in English and German, Musking- 
um, 1921. 



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Arthur Stevenson White, A.M.J. D. 
Professor of Government and 
Sociology 
Ph. D., Grove City, 1903; L. L. B., 
University of Michigan, 1909; M. 
A., Universitv of Michigan, 1914; J. 
D., University of Michigan, 1920; 
Army Y. M. C. A., 1917-1919; Pro- 
fessor of Government and Sociol- 
o-sfv, Muskingum, 1919. 



Jackson B. McKinney, A. M. 
Professor of English 
A. B., Marietta, 1909; A. M., Ohio 
State Universitv. 1913; Military 
Service, 1917-1919; Professor of 
English, Muskingum, 1920. 



Beulah Brooks Brown, Ph. D. 

Associate Professor of English 
Ph. B., Denison University, 1909; 
M. A., Columbia University, 1921; 
Instructor in English, Muskingum, 
1909. 



Earle Ruskin Bryant, A. B., A. M. 

Professor of Biology 
A. B., Milliken University, 1906; A. 
M., Milliken University, 1910; Uni- 
versity of Illinois. 1919; Graduate 
Work, Chicago University; Profes- 
sor of Biology, Muskingum, 1911. 




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William Columbus Hunter, M. A. 

Professor of History 
A. B., Princeton, 1905; M. A., Har- 
vard, 1911; Princeton Graduate Col- 
lege, 1917-1918; Professor of His- 
tory and Economics, Muskingum, 
1919-1920; Professor of History, 
1920. 



James Garfield Ralston, M. S. 
Professor of Chemistry 
A. B., Ohio State University, 1907; 
M. S., Ohio State University, 1918; 
Associate Professor of Chemistry, 
Muskingum, 1919-1920; Professor of 
Chemistry, 1921. 



Mary Augusta Stone, A. B. 
Assistant Professor of Education 
A. B., Muskingum, 1916; Instructor 
in Department of Education, Mus- 
kingum, 1916. 



Erman Floyd Hunter, M. D. 
College Physician. 

B. S., Muskingum, 1915; M. D., 
Western Reserve Medical School, 
1919; College Physician and Pro- 
fessor of Physiology, Muskingum, 
1920. 



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John Jeffrey Smith, A. M., 
B. D., Ph. D. 
Professor of Psychology 
A. B., Bethany College, 1908; A M., 
Bethany, 1909; B. D., Yale Divinity 
School, 1912; A. M., Yale Graduate 
School, 1912; Ph. D., Yale Graduate 
School, 1915; Professor of Psychol- 
ogy, Muskingum, 1920. 



David Douglas Porter, A. M. 
Professor of Physics 
A. B., University of Pittsburg, 1913; 
A. M., University of Pittsburg, 
1917: Graduate Pittsburg Theologi- 
cal Seminarv. 1920; Instructor in 
Greek and Physics, Muskingum, 
1920-1921; Professor of Physics and 
Instructor in Chemistry, Musking- 
um, 1921. 



Chester Joseph Marshall, 
A. B., A. M. 
Professor of Classical Languages 
A. B., Muskingum, 1895; A. M., 
Muskinq-um, 1904; Student at Har- 
vard, 1900-1901; Professor of Agri- 
culture and Chemistry, Knoxville 
College, 1897-1916; Professor, Po- 
mona Junior College, 1916-1921 ; 
Professor of Classical Languages, 
Muskingum, 1921. 



Charles E. White, A. M. 

Professor of Mathematics 
A. B., Indiana University, 1896; M. 
A., Indiana University, 1907; Pro- 
fessor of Mathematics, Muskingum 
College, 1920. 




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M. Louella Pollock, B. S. 
Professor of Home Economics 
B. S., University of Pittsburg, 
1917; Professor of Home Econom- 
ics, Muskingum, 1918. 



Margaret Claire McKelvey, B. S. 

Instructor in Home Economies 
B. S., Muskingum, 1911; Teacher in 
Ohio High Schools, 1911, 1921; In- 
structor in Home Economics, Mus- 
kingum, 1921. 



Leroy Patton, M S. 
Professor of Geology 
A. B., Muskingum, 1905; B. S., Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1913; M. S., 
University of Iowa, 1916; Professor 
of Chemistry and Geology, Mus- 
kingum, 1918-1921; Professor of 
Geology, Muskingum, 1921. 



William Albert Johns, M. S. 
Business Manager and Professor of 

Agriculture 
M. S., University of Kentucky, 
1917; Dean of School of Agricul- 
ture, Tuscilum College; Dean of 
College of A-griculture, Notre 
Dame; Director of Finance, Univer- 
ity of Notre Dame; Vice Presi- 
dent, Evansville College; Professor 
of Agriculture and Business Man- 
ager, Muskingum College, 1921. 



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Sara Allison Gray, B. S. 
Instructor in Art 

B. S., Muskingum, 1877; Instructor 
in Art, Muskingum, 1890. 



Pearle Frances Lantz 

Instructor in Public School Music 

and Drawing 

Violin and Public School Music, 
Ohio University; Graduate of Capi- 
tal College of Music and Oratory, 
1920; Instructor of Public School 
Music and Art, Muskingum, 1921. 



Ezra H. F. Weis, Mus. G, Mus. Bac. 
Director of Conservatory of Music 
Mus. G., Northwestern University, 
1912; Postgraduate Work, North- 
western, 1912-1913; Voice, Chicago; 
Military Service, 1917-1919; Mus. 
Bac, Potomac University, Wash- 
ington, D. C, Director of Musking- 
um Conservatory of Music, 1919. 



Hugo Milo Neuenschwander, 
A. B., Mus. G. 

Instructor in Piano and Organ 
Fort Wayne Conservatory of 
Music; Student and Assistant Bush 
Temple Conservatory of Music; 
Oberlin College and Conservatory 
of Music, 1914-1918; A. B., and 
Mus. G. University of Illinois, 1920: 
Instructor in Piano and Organ, 
Muskingum, 1921. 





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William Wis hart Gray 
Instructor in Violin and Orchestra 
Pupil of Joseph W. Brown, 1889- 
1893; Frances Gates, 1893-1894; 
Ora-Lane-Folk, 1894-1897: Profes- 
sor S. G. Smith, 1896-1899; Pitts- 
burg Conservatory of Music, 1900; 
Instructor in Violin and Orchestra, 
Muskingum, 1912. 



Ruth Louise Pollock 
Librarian 
Graduate Washington Seminary, 
1912; Certificate, Pennsylvania Li- 
brary Commission, 1916; Librarian, 
Muskingum, 1915. 



Eli Camden Henderson, A. B. 
Athletic Director and Coach 
Glenville State Normal Graduate, 
1911; A. B., Salem College, 1917; 
Athletic Director and Coach, Mus- 
kingum, 1920. 



Edna Russel Hosick, B. S. 

Director of Physical Education for 

Women 

Litt. B., Grove City, 1918; B. S., 
Columbia University, 1920; Director 
of Phvsical Education for Women, 
Muskingum, 1920. 



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Jessie A. Keyser, B. S. 
B. S.. Muskingum College, 1916; B. 
S., in Agriculture, Ohio State Uni- 
versity; B. S. in Education, Ohio 
State; Professor of Physics, Mus- 
kingum Academy, 1920. 



Jeannette A. Reed, M. A. 
B. A., Ohio Wesleyan, 1911; Grad- 
uate study, Wisconsin University, 
1914-1916; M. A., Wisconsin, 1915; 
Instructor in Classical Languages, 
Muskingum Collgee and Academy, 
1917. 



Grace Gordon McCreary, A. B. 
A. B., Muskingum, 1913; Instructor 
in English, Muskingum Academy, 
1919. 



Geneva Kathleen Montgomery, 

A. B. 

A. B., Muskingum, 1918; Instructor 

in French, Muskingum Academv, 

1920. 




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Anianda Dorrance Keyser, B. A. 
Ohio State University, 1916; B. A. 
Muskingum, 1921; Home Econom- 
ics, Muskingum Academy, 1921. 



Gertrude Martin, M. A. 
B. A., Muskingum, 1920, M. A., 
Columbia University, 1921 ; Instruc- 
tor in Public Speaking, Muskingum 
Academy, 1921. 



Layton Cain, A. B. 
A. B., Muskingum, 1910; Instructor 
in Mathematics, Muskingum Acad- 
emy, 1921. 



G. C. McCoNAGHA 

Chief Engineer 
Accepted position with Muskingum 
College in 1907. Chief Engineer 
Muskingum College, 1 C '1S. 



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SENIORS 

Out of the mists of four years of college experiences they 
come — Seniors! Some of them are jolly, some eager; some 
solemn, some quiet ; some laughing, some dreamy -eyed ; some of 
them with hearts and souls armed with courage and others un- 
certain and hesitant. But as they look out across the world's 
horizon, irrespective of experiences and circumstances and tem- 
peraments, in each heart there beats the self-same aspirations 
and dreams that have dwelt in the hearts of Seniors of all ages — 
the heritage of four wondrous college years. Very near and dear 
to their hearts has grown the alma mater that has given them 
such priceless blessings during the days spent here and ever the 
same message they will send back when they are gone — "Fear 
not — the best is just ahead." 



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ROBERT T. MOORE, A B. 
Xenia, Ohio 
Philo Major-Oratory 

Class Pres., 4; Treas. 3; Bask- 
etball, 1, 2, 3, 4; Capt., 3; 
Tennis, 2, 3; Class Football, 1, 
2, 3, 4; Glee Club, 3, 4; Reader, 
3; College Quartet, 3. 4; 
Choral, 1. 



HELEN WRIGHT, B. Sin. Ed. 

College Corners, Ohio 
Ero. Major-English 

Class Sec'y. 4; Junior Play, 3; 
Senior Play, 4; Ero Play, 2, 4; 
Class Basketball, 1, 2; Choral, 
3- Violin Festival, 2. 



RAY M. DAVIS, A. B. 
New Concord, Ohio 
Major-History 
Y. M. C. A. Sec'y, 4; Class 
Treas., 1; V. Pres., 4; Foot- 
ball, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club, 1, 2, 3, 
4; Manager, 4; College Quartet, 
1, 3, 4; Violin Festival, 1. 2. 



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MARY ALLISON, Music 
McGrann, Pa. 



WILLARD CAMPBELL, A. B. 

New Concord, Ohio 
U. L. Major-Political Science Major-Voice 

Class Treas., 4; Junior Play, 3; Glee Club. 4; Choral. 1, 2, 3, 
College Band, 1, 2, 3, 4; Var- 4; B. "- 
sity Debate, 2, -I. 



HARVEY APPLE, A. B. 

Middletown, Ohio 

U. L. Major-History 



M. Staff, 4. 



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VIRGIL L. BAKER, A. B. 
New Concord, Ohio 
Philo Major-Oratory 

College Orator, 3; Muscoljuan, 
3 ; Gospel Team, 3 ; Football, 3 ; 
Debate, 4; Class Basketball, 1, 
2, 3. 



BERNICE M. BOYD, A. B. 
New Concord, Ohio 
Ero Major-Oratory 

Western College for Women, 1, 
2; Glee Club, 4; Junior Play, 3; 
Senior Play, 4. 



MERLE BEVINGTON, A. B. 

Quaker City, Ohio 
Philo Major-Chemistry 

Glee Club, 2, 4; Orchestra, 2; 
Choral, 1, 2; Band, 1, 2, 4; B. 
& M., 2; K. K. K., 2; Senior 
Play, 4. 



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HAROLD M. BROWN, B. S. 

New Concord, Ohio 
Philo Major-Chemistry 

College Band, 1, 2, 3, 4; Class 
Football, 3, 4. 



HELEN B. COCHARD, A. B. 

Pittsburg, Pa. 
Aretean Diploma 

Major-Political Science 
Graduate of Clarion State Nor- 
mal School; Army School of 
Nursing, 1918-19. 



HAROLD BROWNLEE, A. B. 

New Concord, Ohio 
U. L. Major-Political Science 
Y. M. Cabinet, 4; Glee Club, 3, 
4; Class Basketball, 1, 2, 3, 4 
Class Baseball, 2; Choral, 1 
B. & M., 4; Minstrel, 3. 



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WERNER E. BUKER, A. B. 

Norwick, Ohio 

Major-Mathema tics 

Class Football, 2; Choral 2, 3, 

4. 



HELEN CLELAND, A. B. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Major-Home Economics 
Glee Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Choral, 
1; B. & M., 4; Muscoljuan, 3; 
Keystone Club Sec'y. i; Class 
Sec'y, 2; Senior Play. 



HAROLD CALDWELL, A. B. 

Crafton, Pa. 
U. L. Major-History 

Keystone Club Treasurer, 3; 
Class Football, 2, 3, 4. 



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DANIEL CAMPBELL, A. B. 

Alliance, Ohio 
Philo Major-Philosophy 

Y. M. Cabinet, 3; Geneva Con. 
2; Volunteer Group, 4; Gospel 
Team, 4; Choral, 4; Class Foot- 
ball, 2, 4; Class Basketball, 1, 
2, 3, 4. 



HELEN DONALDSON, A. B. 

Carrollton, Ohio 
Aretean Diploma Major-English 
Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, 3, 4; 
Eaglesmere Conference, 3. 



RAYMOND CHERRY, A. B. 
Xenia, Ohio 

Philo Major-Oratory 

Volunteer Group, 3, 4 ; Lake 
Geneva Conference, 2. 




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CAREY CRAWFORD, A. B 

New Concord, Ohio 

Major-Philosophy 

Ohio Northern University, 1 



HELEN B. FLESHER, A. 

Cairo, W. Va. 
Aretean Major-Spanish 

Glee Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Choral; 
Quartette, 4; Junior Song Lead- 
er, 3. 



CHARLES DITTMAR, A. B. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

U. L. Major-Political Science 
B. & M. Staff, 2; Varsity Foot- 
ball, 2. 



FRANCIS S. DOUDNA, A. B. 
Cambridge, Ohio 
Major-Mathematics 
Tennis, 2, 3; Manager. 4; Glee 
Club, 3, 4; Orchestra, 1, 2, 3, 
4; Band, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



EDNA M. FORBES, A. 
New Conocrd, Ohio 
Major-English 



B. 



LLOYD B. FIFE, A. B. 
Welleville, Ohio 
Major-Economics 
Class Football, 3, 4. 




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ORRIN R. FINDLEY, B. S. 
Millersburg, Ohio 
Philo Major-Chemistry 

Class Football; Class Basket- 
ball; Senior Play, 4; Stage 
Manager. 



NANCY J. FORD, A. B. 

New Concord, Ohio 
Major-Oratory 
Senior Play, 4; Oratory Diplo- 
ma. 



OLLIE FINK, A. B. 
Zanesville, Ohio 

Major-Political Science 
Glee Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Orches- 
tra, 2; Choral, 2; Band, 2, 3, 4; 
Violin Festival, 2. 






JAMES M. FRASER, A. B. 
Washington, Pa. 
Major-Chemistry 

Choral, 4; Band, 4; Washing- 
ton and Jefferson College, 1, 2, 
3. 



VIRGINIA GIBBON, A. B. 
Zanesville, Ohio 
Ero Major-Oratory 

Junior Plav, 3; Orchestra, 1, 2, 
3, 4; Violin Festival, 1, 2, 3, 
4; Brown Oratorical Contest, 3; 
Oratory Diploma; Senior Play, 
4. 



RALPH W. FROST, A. B. 
Chester, W. Va. 
Philo Major-Philosophy 

Y. M. Cabinet, 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Lake 
Geneva, 2, 3; Volunteer Band, 
1, 2, 3, 4; Gospel Team, 1, 2, 
3, 4; Class Football, 3. 4; Glee 
Club, 3, 4; Class Treas.. 3; 
Choral, 3. 




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JOSEPH FITZWATER, B. S. 
Chicago, 111. 
Major-Chemistry 
Northwestern University, 1; 
funiata College, 2 ; Magenta 
Minstrels, 3; Class Football, 3, 
4 ; Senior Play, 4. 



ESTHER GILLOGLY, A. E. 

New Conocrd, Ohio 

Aretean Major-History 

Pomona College, 2; Y. W. C. 

A. Cabinet, 4; B. & M. Staff, 4. 



HAROLD S. GIFFEN, A. B. 

New Concord, Ohio 
Philo Major-Philosophy 

Y. M. Cabinet, 3; Geneva Con., 
2; Volunteer Group, 3, 4; Or- 
chestra, 1, 3; Choral, 1, 2, 4; 
Band, 1, 2, 3, 4; Muscoljuan, 3. 



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HORACE K. GIFFEN, A. B. 

New Concord, Ohio 
Philo Major-Chemistry 

Student Honor Council, 2, 3, 4; 
Pres., 4; Y. M. Cabinet, 2, 3, 
4; B. & M., 4; Muscoljuan, 3; 
Junior Play; Orchestra, 2, 3, 4 ; 
Choral, 1, 2, 3 ; Band, 1, 2, 3, 
4; Geneva Con., 3; Senior Play, 
4. 



ETHEL GORDON, A. B. 
Bergholz, Ohio 
Aretean 

Major-Home Economics 
Choral, 2, 4; Women's Advisory 
Board, 4. 



J. PAUL GRAHAM, A. B. 
Reynoldsburg, Ohio 
Fhilo Major-History 

Class Pres., 2; Y. M. Cabinet, 
2, 3; Gospel Team, 2, 3, 4 
Baseball, 1, 2, 3. 4; B. & M. 4 
Muscoljuan, 3; Magneta Min- 
strels, 3. 




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GEORGE D. GRAY, A. B. 
New Concord, Ohio 
U. L. Major-Political Science 

Debate, 2. 



LULA M. GRAHAM, A. B. 
New Concord, Ohio 
Major-English 
Senior Play, 4. 



ABNER E. GREGG, A. B. 
Belmont, Ohio 
Philo Major-Chemistry 

Junior Play, 3. 



DANIEL HAMILTON, A. B. RUTH L. HUTCHMAN, A. B. 

Glenford, Ohio Pittsburg, Kansas 

Philo Major-Oratory Aretean Ma ; or-Oratory 

Volunteer Group, 3, 4; Lake Class V. Pres., 3; Student 
Geneva Conefrence, 3; Gospel Honor Council, 2; Y. W. Cab- 
TeaTi, 4; /unror Play, 3; Senior inet, 2, 3, 4; Eaglesmere Con., 
Play. 4. 3; Des Moines Con., 2; Volun- 

teer Group, 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee 
Club, 2, 3; Muscoliuan, 3; 
Choral, 1. 



FRANK R. HUNT, A. B. 

Gilmore, Ohio 

Philo Majc.r-History 

French Play, 4; French Club. 





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CHARLES 7 . HUSSEY, A. B. 

Pittsburg, Kansas 
U. L. Major-Oratory 

Junior Play, 3: Y. M. Cabinet, 
3, 4; Gospel Team, 3, 4; Foot- 
ball, 2, 3, 4; Capt.. 4; B. & M. 
Board of Control, 3; Debate, 3: 
Class Basketball, 3 r Senior 
Play, 4. 



RACHEL LOUGHRIDGE.A.B. 

Rushaylvania, Ohio 
Aretean Major-'inglish 

Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, 3, 4; 
Ass't Librarian Contest, 3; Win- 
ner Bible Reading Contest, 3; 
France Club Sec'y, 3. 



PAUL E. HUTCHMAM, A. B. 

Pittsburgh, Kansas 
Majcr-Oratory, Political Science 
U. L. 

Debate, 4: B. & M. Board of 
Control; 1: Brown Oratirical 
Contest, 3 ; Tennis, I, 3 ; Foot- 
ball, 1, 3; Class Ba.-Vetball, x, 
3, 4; Class Orator, 4; Pres. 
"M" Association, 4. 



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HOWARD S. JOHNSON, A.B. 

New Athens, Ohio 
Philo Major-French 

Franklin College. 1, 2, 3; 
Choral, 4. 



FLORENCE MALONE. 
Washington, Pa. 
M;ijor- English 



A. B. HERRICK JOHNSTON, A. B. 
West Point, Miss. 
U. L. Major-Chemistry 

Muscoljuan Editor, 3; Y. M. 
Treas., 3; La^ie Geneva, 2; 
Pres. Science Club, 3; Debate, 
3; Weaver DcclamrttionCnn. ; 
Gospel Teim. 




o 







RALPH A. LAUGHLIN 
Cambridge, Ohio 
Major-Chemsitry 

A. B. Marietta, -Major, Philoso 

phy. 



MARY M. MALONE, A. B. 

Washington, Pa. 

Major-Biology 



T. THOBURN LEDMAN, A. B. 

Rix Mills, Ohio 

Major-Chemistry 

Junior Play, Bus. Manager, 3; 

Football, 4; Class Football, 2; 

Band, 1, 2, 3; Senior Play, Bus. 

Manager, 4. 



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HAROLD LOBAUGH, A. B. 

Conoquenessing, Pa. 
Philo Major-Greek 

Class Pres 3: Keystone Club 
Pres., 4; Y. M. Cabinet, 3 
Pres., 4 ; Lake Geneva, 2, 3 
Volunteer Group, 2, 3, 4 
Gospel Tesm, 3, 4; Baseball, 2 
Glee Club, 4; Muscoliuan, 3. 



MARGARET MILLER, A. B. 

Library, Pa. 
Aretean Major-Oratory 

Student Honor Council, 3, 4; 
Keystone Club Sec'y, 3; Mus- 
coljuan, 3; Y. W. Cabinet, 4; 
Eaglesmere, 3; Glee Club, 4; 
Choral, 1, 2, 3; Senior Play, 4. 



ROBERT J. McCLAIN, A. B. 

Jewett, Ohio 
Philo Major-Biology 

Normal School, Scio, Ohio . 



w 4# ' 



I 55] 



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a 




I. RUTH MOORE, A. B. 
Butler, Pa. 
Major-History 
Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, 41; Junior 
Play, 3; "A" Association, 2, 3, 
4; Choral, 2; Eaglesmere, 3; 
Senior Play, 4. 



FRANK W. McGUIRE, A. B. 

Tappan, Ohio 
U. L. Major-Mathematics 



MARTHA MORRISON, A. B. 

Keisters, Pa. 
Ero Major-English 

Ero Play, 3; Keystone Club. 




WILLIS McCULLOUGH.A.B. 

Steubenville, Ohio 
Philo Major-Mathematics 



HELEN MORGAN, Music 
New Concord, Ohio 

Major-Theory, Violin 
Violin Festival 



W. WADE MILLER, A. B. 
Lewiston, Pa. 
Major-History 

Student Volunteer Group, 3, 4; 
Treas., 4; Gospel Team, 4; 
Choral, 3 ; Treasurer Empire 
Club, 3. 




I 56] 




imp* 



3 




VELMA G. MOSS, A. B. 
Cambridge, Ohio 
Aretean Diploma 

Major-Oratory 
Class Treas., I; Junior Play, 3; 
Y. W. Cabinet, 3, 4; Pres. 4; 
Muscoljuan, 3; Senior Play, 4; 
"A". Assocaition, . z, . 3,. 4; 
Eaglesmere, 2, 3. 



ARTHUR M. MINTIER, A. B. 
Flushing, Ohio 

Philo 

Major-Politica! Science 
Muscoljuan, 3 ; B. & M., 3; 
Cheer Leader, s; Band, 4; Sen- 
ior Play, 4; Philo Play, 4; 
Class Football, 3, 4; Class 
Baseball, 2; Class Basketball, 4. 



LENA C. POLLOCK, A. B. 
Fairpoint, Ohio 
Aretean Diploma 

Major-English 
Senior Play, 4. 



GEORGE J. MURDOCH, A. B. MARY M. REED, A. B. 

Cambridge, N. Y. New Concord, Ohio 

U. L. Major-Philosophy Major-Oratory 

Pres. Athletic Assn., 4; Choral Y. W. Sec'y, 4; Volunteer 

1, 2, 3, 4; Class Football, 2, 3, Group, 2, 3, 4; Sec'y, 3: Na- 

4; Gospel Team, 2, 3, 4; Vol- tional Exec. Com., 4 ; Student 

unteer Group, 2, 3, 4; Treas., Honor Council, 4; Junior Play, 

3; Empire Club, 3, 4; Pres., 4; 3; Senior Play, 4. 
Junior Play, 3; Springfield Con., 
2; Geneva Con., 3. 



C .MAXWELL MYERS, A. B. 

Irwin, Pa. 

Major-Economics 



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EMMA L. STEWART, A. B. 

Cambridge, Ohio 

Ero. Major-English 

Choral, 2, 3, 4; Cambridge 

Club. 



RALPH PEACOCK, A. B. 

Houston, Pa. 

Major-Economics 

Class Football, 2; Glee Club, 3, 



MARIAN R. SHAW, Music 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Ero. Major-Piano, Organ 

Temple. University,. 1;. Glee 
Club, 4; Choral, 3, A. 




THOMAS C. POLLOCK. A. B. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
U. L. Major-Oratory 

Editor B. & M., 4; Y. M. Cabi- 
net, 1; Glee Club,. 4;. Bible 
Reading Contest, 3; Junior Play, 
3; Class Football, 1, 2 4; 
Class Basketball, 1, 3, 4: Senior 
Play, 4 



MABEL THOMPSON, A. B. 
East Fultonham, Ohio 
Major-Home Economics 



GEORGE T. KANKIN, A. 
Cambridge, Ohio 
Major-Chemistry 

Cambridge Club. 




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GRACE G. WATSON, A. B. 

New Concord, Ohio 

Major-Home Economics 




ARTHUR G. REED, A. B. 

New Conocrd, Ohio 
Major-Oratory 
Philo Diploma 

Volunteer Group, 4; Gospel 
Team, 4 ; Choral, 4 ; Senior 
Play, 4; French Club; Assuit 
College (Egypt), 1. 



WANDA WHITE, A. B. 

New Concord, Ohio 

Ero. Major-Economics 

President ot Choral Society, 4. 



THURLOW S. ROBE. A. B. ELIZABETH WINTER, A. B. 
New Conocrd, Ohio Youngstown, Onto 

Philo Diploma Major-History Aretean Major-History 

aara — 7aaL.--a. -. aa- a _ — rj-r Y. W. Cabinet 3; Class Basket- 



J. RODNEY SHAW, B. S. 

Roseville, Ohio 

Major-Chemistry 

Glee Club, 3, 4; Magenta Min- 



fljEP«3? jra 8 ?^ 



ball, 2; Choral, 2, 3; Senior strel, 3. 
Play, 4; "A" Associ?tion; 
French Club, 2, 4. 





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5 





F. HAROLD STOUP, B. S. 
Valencia, Pa. 
Major-Philosophy 
Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, 4; Glee 
Club, 3, 4; College Orchestra, 
1, 2, 3, 4: Band, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Violin Festival. 



ROBERT M. WILSON, A. B. 

Pittsburg, Pa. 
U. L. Major-Greek 

Baseball, 1; Football, 4; Class 
Basketball, 4; Monmouth Col- 
lege, 2, 3. 



ROSS S. WILSON, A. B. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
Philo Major-Philosophy 

Football, 2, 3; Ass't Coach, 4 
Class Football, 1; Class Basket- 
ball, 1, 2, 3, 4; Junior Pljy, 3 
Y. M. Cabinet, 2; Gospel learn, 
1, 2; B. & M., 2; Northfield 
Con., 2; Brown Oratorical Con., 
3. 



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A. WILBUR WISHART, A. B. 

Pittsburg, Pa. 
Philo Major-English 

Class Pres., 1; Debate, 3, 4; 
Student Honor Council, 4; Glee 
Club, 2; Choral 1, 2, 3. 



ROXIE HENDERSON, A. B. 
New Concord, Ohio 
Major Sociology 
A. B., Salem College, 191?. 




GO] 






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JUNIORS 



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John Ballantyne, D. G. 
Xenia, Ohio 



Mildred Keboch, Ph. F. 
Aspinwall, Pennsylvania 



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Helen Stephenson Burns, V. P. 
Sparta, Illinois 




JUNIOR CLASS 

Our class has diminished in numbers since we entered Mus- 
kingum. But even after many members dropped out and a few 
went on to the class of 1922 to contribute talent to our Seniors, 
we still have a goodly crowd of ambitious, talented Muskingum- 
ites. 

The degrees (found on page 78) which we have received in- 
dicate just what each member of our class is. 

This class of '23 has seen many improvements on the cam- 
pus — the erection of Montgomery Hall, and of the Women's 
Dormitory, and the coming of a bigger Muskingum. 

Every year of our college life has been better and we would 
tell the juniors to come of the privilege before them but we 
cannot; it can be learned only by experience. So we can only 
wish them luck. 

Our greatest ambition is to make our Alma Mater proud of 
us when we have left her halls. So to this end we will bend the 
efforts of our last year at Muskingum. 



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Josephine Killough, J. Mg. 
Germantown, Pennsylvania 



Ina May Carr, C. B. 

New Comerstown, Ohio 



Maynard Coe Allen, S. .B S. 
New Athens, Ohio 



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it 



Letha Ruth Collins, B. G. 
Bloomfield, Ohio 



James Ferguson Allison. B. C. 
McGrann. Pennsylvania 



Floyd Fleming Bay, D. D. 
New Concord, Ohio 




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Otto Paul Beighley, L. K. 
East McKeesport, Pennsylvania 



John Fred Bell, D. D. D. 
Carrollton, Ohio 



Margaret Collins Dennison, F. D. 
New Concord, Ohio 



Rebecca Long Dugan, B. A. 
Cambridge, Ohio 



Robert Paul Burns, E. B. 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 



Frank Elden Boarden, O. O. 
Malta, Ohio 




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I 





William Howard Clark, S. U. 
W. Middletovvn, Pennsylvania 



Virgil McComb Cosby, A. C. 
Ellwood City, Pennsylvania 



Marion Elizabeth Dunn, C. S. 
Salem, New York 



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Helen Jane Espy, F. F. F 
Cambridge, Ohio 



Dana Wesley Cox, R. L. 
Newcastle, Pennsvlvania 



Donald Hayes Daugherty, S. R. 
New Concord, Ohio 




[ 65] 



A 






Harry Kai.imer Eby, P. P. 
Aspinwall, Pennsylvania 



James P. Fitzwater, L. M. 
Chicago, Illinois 



Oroi.ine E. Gibson, V. V. 
South Ryegale, Vermont 



Eunice Naomi Gillogly, R. D. 
New Concord, Ohio 



James Arthur Fleming, S. M. 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 



Lewis Herman Fraser, J. G. 
Wellsville, Ohio 




O 



O 







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i 





David Williamson Gordon, M. A. 
New Concord, Ohio 



Cary Bates Graham, T. K. A. 
Cumberland, Ohio 



Evelyn Zentmyer Goff, D. G. 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



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I 



Martha Goodwin, J. C. 
Cambridge, Ohio 



Robert Morrison Giffen, F. F. 
St. Clairsville, Ohio 



Joseph McKee Hutchison, S. S. 
Bellcvue, Pennsylvania 




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[ 67] 



A 



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I 



1 



II 



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Darwin Marion Haynes, O. P 
Hanover, Ohio 



Clifford H. Hicks, H. S 
Zanesville, Ohio 



Leda Hope Green, V. B. 
Rushville, Indiana 



Freda Helen Harrison, A. S. 
Centerville, Pennsylvania 



John Elliott Irvine, F. J. 
Steubenville, Ohio 



Harry Clifford Jeffers, M. D. 
College Corner, Ohio 




O 



68] 



3 





9 





Joseph Murl Tohnston, S. N. S. 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



Albert Lewis /ones, B. A. 
Youngstown, Ohio 



Mary Hood, A. E. L. 
Cambridge, Ohio 



IVA MlNNETTA JACKSON, W. W. 

Apollo, Pennsylvania 



Hugh Espy Kelsey, D. D. 
New Concord, Ohio 



Wilbur Wilson Knox, K. K K. 
New Athens, Ohio 





[ 69] 



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Philip Collins Kyle, A. R. 
Xenia, Ohio 



William Lees, L. B. 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



i 

11 

1 



Virginia Lowther, N. G. 
Wellsville, Ohio 




Dorothy Hazen Miller, T. T. 
Library, Pennsylvania 



Dwight Edwin Lyons, A. A. 
Chandlersvillc, Ohio 



Harley Kenneth Lyons, R. M. 
New Concord, Ohio 




[ 70] 



\\_\ 923 n 








9 





Donald Barclay McBane, P. P. 
Bergholz, Ohio 



James Everett McClenahan, L.E.A. 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



Hazel Letitia Miller, D. D. 
Indiana, Pennsylvania 



Mildred Althea Miskimen, J. W. 
New Comerstown, Ohio 



James Dale McKibeen, G. L. 
Hoopeston, Illinois 



Kenneth E. Miller, N. R. 
Stcubenville, Ohio 





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John William Hannon, T. A. M. 
Washington, Pa. 



Wendall Reid Mintier, M. A. 
New Concord, Ohio 



Lucille Adams, I. G. 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



\ 



ft 



Sara Louise Pollock, N. I. 
Aledo, Illinois 



Thomas McQueen, S. S. 
Greenville, Pa. 



James Luther Moore, F. F. 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 




I 72] 



I 





Robert Duff Moore, E. E. 
New Concord, Ohio 



Robin Morton, L. L. 
New Concord, Ohio 



Martha Belle Pollock, S. A. S. 
Aledo, Illinois 



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Edjth La Verne Pry, D. M. 
St. Louis, Missouri 



John Crawford Park, H. H. 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



James Alfred Pringle, D. D. 
Grove City, Pa. 




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1 









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I 




Maxa Bradley, C. S. 
Gastonia, North Carolina 




Gladys Mary Rogers, F. F. 
Bellefcntaine, Ohio 



Rorert Hawthorn Rockwell, Ph. P. 
Akron, Ohio 



o 

ft 



Ja.mes Theodore Saltsciver, C. C. 
Avonmore, Pa. 



Helen Rogers, L. L .D. 
Homewood, Pennsylvania 



Elizabeth McGill, L. L. 
Greggs, Pennsylvania 




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[ 74] 



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Mary McFadden, C. R. L. 
New Athens, Ohio 



Mary Barton Smeltz, D. H. D. 
Carrollton, Ohio 



John Earl Sells, P. P. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 



William Norman Shane, O. P. 
Carrollton, Ohio 



Lldia McKee Steele, L. N. P. 
Wilkinsburg, Pa. 



Esther Stewart, P. M. 
Pittsburg, Kansas 





& 



_J JW^ W IMW IWIHWIMITI» "[_ 



a 






Janet Evangeline Thompson, S.I.S. 
Alliance, Ohio 



Agnes Moorehead, T. T. 
Reedsburg, Wisconsin 



Raymond Stanley Short, T. H. G. 
Xenia, Ohio 



Jay Warren Stauffer, B. B. 
East McKeesport, Pa. 



Mary Winifred Thompson, U. Q. 
New Concord, Ohio 



WlLDA MOSSMAN THOMPSON, M.H.Q. 

New Concord, Ohio 




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Evelyn Tromans, H. S. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



Frances Mae Barton, R. A. 
Ellwood City, Pa. 



Ford Clayton Stevenson, R. R. 
Butler, Pa. 



Reo Miskimen Swan, S. S. 
Birds Run, Ohio 



Tweeny Bessie Williams, S. F. 
Martins Ferry, Ohio 



Vera Melone, V. A. 
New Concord, Ohio 





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Kris Kenneweg, P. J. 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



James Andre Weyer, J. G. 
Canton, Ohio 



Junior Degrees 



A. 


C. 


Abbreviated Chunk 


L. 


L. 


A. 


^ 


"A" Student 


L. 


L. 


A. 


E. 


L. Always Earl — Ly 


L. 


N. 


A. 


R. 


Always (W) Bight 


^ 


L. 


A. 


A. 


An Aggie 


M. 


D. 


B. 


C. 


Big Chief 


M. 


A. 


B. 


B. 


Beau Brummel 


M. 


A. 


B. 


A. 


Bobbed-haired Artist 


M. 


H. 


B. 


G. 


Bloomfield's Gleaner 


N. 


R. 


B. 


A. 


Back Again 


N. 


I. 


C. 


B. 


Chatter Box 


N. 


G. 


C. 


S. 


Carolina Sunshine 


O. 


O. 


C. 


c. 


Country Cousin 


O. 


P. 


C. 


R. 


I,. Curly Red Locks 


o. 


P. 


C. 


S. 


Chemistry SharJc 


Ph 


. F 


D. 


G. 


Darned Good 


P. 


P. 


D. 


D. 


Dear Daddy 


P. 


T. 


JJ. 


JJ. 


D. Dad Durn Dude 


J'h 


. P. 


D. 


G. 


Daddy's Girlie 


P. 


P. 


D. 


JJ. 


Devout Deacon 


P. 


P. 


D. 


D. 


Darling Deaconess 


P. 


M. 


D. 


M. 


Demure Maid 


R. 


R. 


D. 


D. 


Dashing Dandy 


R. 


A. 


D. 


H. 


D. Does Her Duty 


R. 


L. 


E. 


B. 


Eagle Beak 


R. 


D. 


E. 


E. 


Eccentric Electrician 


R. 


M. 


F. 


D. 


Fancy Dancer 


S. 


B. 


F. 


F. 


F. Fuzz, Firbelows, Fredei 


ick S. 


S. 


F. 


F. 


Film Fiend 


S. 


R. 


F 


. F. 


Frost's Friend 


S.M. 


F. 


T. 


Fighting Jack 


S. 


C. 


F. 


F. 


Fancy Fiddler 


S. 


N. 


G. 


L. 


Greased Lightning 


S. 


r 


It 


S. 


History Shark 


S. 


A. 


II 


. H 


Hatless Hust'er 


S. 


S. 


11 


S. 


Hay Seed 


S. 


b". 


I, 


G. 


Irredescent Gem 


S. 


S. 


1. 


Mg 


Junior Monej grabber 


T. 


K. 


1. 


G. 


1 unior Gibraltar 


T. 


T. 


T. 


c. 


Tust Can't 


T. 


H. 


r. 


G. 


Junior Goliath 


T. 


T. 


r. 


W. 


Junior Wit 


T. 


A. 


K 


K. 


K. Kleau Kut Ivid 


U 


(). 


L. 


K. 


Lady Iviller 


V. 


A. 


L. 


M 


Laughing Matter 


V. 


P. 


L. 


B. 


Louise Brownlee 


V. 


V. 


L 


E. 


A. Love's 'Em All 


V. 

w 


B. 
. W 



Loveless Lad 
D. Lovin' Little Damsel 
P. "Love Nest" Promoter 
Laboring Lassie 

Merits Distinction 

Mammoth Appetite 

Muscoljuan's Artist 
O Montgomery Hall Queen' 

Never Ruth — less 
Noisy Illinoisan 

Notional Ginny 

Opinionated Oyster 
Obliging Parson 

Oh Pshaw! 
Phritz's Favorite 
Presumably a Parson 
Pittsburgh Jew 

Phundamental Pr'nc.nles 
Pigskin Punter 
Powerful Pugilis* 

Purely Musical 

Rattling Rambler 

"Reeding" Athlete 

Raven Locks 

Rea-Die 

Rix Miller 
S. Slow But Sure 
Suthern's Understuriy 
Sagacious Rumlnator 
Sleeping Moses 

Smitli's Songster 
S. Sub Nasal Shrubbery 
S. Surely Is Swee: 
S. Same As Sarah 
Sober Sides 

Spoken For 
Shy Swain 
A. Tau Kappa Alpha 

Takes Teasing 
G. Think's He Good 

Talented Terpsichoreanne 
M. The "Arrow" Man 

Unknown Quality 

Versatile Artist 

Very Precious 

Vermont's Vamp 

Verdant Bon-ton 
'. Worth While 



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George Crouch 
Vice President 



Mildred Galloway 
Secretary 



John Russel Keach 
President 



Newton Webb Hutchison 
Treasurer 



SOPHOMORES 

Everyone appreciates a Sophomore. He is one of the seven 
wonders of the world — other wonders being electricity, teleg- 
raphy, and thunder. No doubt this accounts for the way the 
Seniors smile on us even after having had one year'scompanion- 
ship with us. Indeed they have placed us on a level with them- 
selves. 

Even the Freshmen realize our worth. These children have 
been know to follow us about and we find that still they gaze and 
still the wonder grew that one small class could carry all we 
knew. 

Indeed we excell in all college activities. But, alas! we are 
very modest about it. 





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Lena Roberta Alloway Bessie Florence Armstrong 
Charles John Aiken Frances Irene Anderson Frank Edward Ballenger 




Berwick Colmery Barton George Raleigh Besore 

Hazel Ballenger Farley W. Bell Horace Waters Bikle 



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Velma Dorothy Brewer James D. Brown 

Homer Thompson Borton Raymond V. Brock Louise Templcton Brownlcc 



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Bryan Duncan Buchanan James McGowan Chalfant Frances Chorpenning 



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Edwin Milligan Clark Alice Davis 

Maurice Chopin Chase Stanley Carlton Compiler Mary Ruth Deselm 



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Mary Elizabch Dumm Dorothy Earley 

James Thomas Downic Paul James Eakin Lillian Isabel Estill 



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Roderick Ross Franks Sarah Wilma Gallagher 

Hallie Fink Clark Mahon Furbee Henry Stees Gegler 



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Lois Giffen Paul McBride Gillis 

Mary Gibson Sara Giffen Frances Willard Gray 



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James Prather Griffith Ellen jane Groves Thomas Clifford Hay 



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Clyde Hutson Helen Campbell Hyde 

Rena Marguerite Heagen George William Hutton Mary Isabel Johnson 



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Mary Alice Johnston Everett Merle Karnes Audrey Marie Kelly 



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Lucrctia Guss Klein Clelia Virginia Laverty 

Mary Elizabeth Kelscy Gladys Laughlin Martha Myrtle Law 



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William Linville Loudon Hugh Orlando Mallett 

David James Lewis Mary Frances Lyle Emmett Le Moyne Manfull 




Lois K. McAllister Christine Harriet McBride 

Dora Elizabeth Martin Dwight Jay McBane Eleanor Isabel McBurney 





Margaret McFadden Margaret Mac McKee 

Mary Alice McConagha Sarah Elizabeh McFct ridge Charles Hamer Merilcss 



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Thomas Patterson Miller Mary Olive Moore 

Maude Mitchell Miller Clark Dennis Moore Ruth LePage Moore 




Virginia Byran Morrow Margaret Lucinda Murdoch 
Grace Barbara Morris Harold Frederic Mosher Rebecca Watierson Nesbit 




J. Alvin Orr, Jr. Margaret H. Pollock 

Harry Archibald Nicliol Stewart Arnold Parker Irwin Eugene Pounds 



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Walter Reed Harry Virgil Revenaugh 

Frank M. Reed Mildred Jane Reeder Laura Reynolds 




Laura Kathryn Riesbeck" James Don Root 

Lucille Liklian Rich John Wilbur Robison Anna Mary Shane 





Pauline Simpson Donald Avery Smith 

Frank Russell Short Margaret Roxanna Smcltz Martha Stevenson 



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Elizabeth Neill Stewart Ursula Agnes Stewart Will Scroggs Thompson 





Velma Rebecca Twinam, Virginia Elizabeth Wallace 
Margaret Lois Timmons Ross Virtue Mary Grace Watson 



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Raymond Smith Young 
Mary Elizabeth White Frank Shaffer 



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FRESHMAN CLASS 

Many have been the remarks heard on our Muskingum Campus 
this fall, to this effct : "And that Freshman Class — it's the largest, 
best and peppiest class that has ever entered Muskingum !" We 
Freshmen think so too, and if you have not found it out yet, wie 
have no fear that you will not so discover, as soon as you come in 
contact with this whirlwind of brains, knowledge, true loyal spirit, 
and really active vim, vitality, and vigor. Our mettle has been 
tested and proved ; we have been found responsive — ready and will- 
ing to do our part when called upon. We intend to give the very 
best — and our best cannot be surpassed — to Muskingum. Watch 
out ! You shall hear from us. We're the class of 'twenty-five ! 



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Freshmen Not Shown in Picture 



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(Including those who have just registered the second semester) 



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Black, Francis Loudon 
Brown, Clarence Calvin 
Brown, Martha Elizabeth 
Burris, Walter Craig 
Casner, Ruth Ellen 
Corwin, Lorna May 
Cox, William Bryan 
Duncan, Lawrence Barr 
Earley, Ruth Frances 
Elliott, Carl Clarence 
Ellison, Helen 
Estill, Lillian 
Fulton, Augusta (Mrs.) 
Gates, John Carter 
Geyer, Donald Taylor 
Graham, Victor D. 
Henderson, Sadie Isabel 
Herron, Mary Elizabeth 



Irwin, Wilma 

Kelley, Mildred Louise 

Kindle, Margaret 

Lawrence, Robert Spencer 

McConnell, Eugene Edward 

McCormick, George Asa 

McCune, Harold 

Marshall, Robert James, Jr. 

Martin, Victor Oliver 

Minnear, Howard B. 

Murphy, Wilmot George 

Pitt, Page 

Robison, Anna Kathryn 

Stewart, John 

Ward, Donald Wilson 

Watt, Eula Marjorie 

Watt, Mary Mildred 

Webster, Dale 



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"And the night shall be filled with music 
And the cares that infest the day, 
Shall fold their tents, like Arabs, 
And as silently steal away." 

— Selected. 

"Music, the greatest good that mortals know, 
And all of heaven we love below." 

— Addison. 

"It is in music, perhaps, that the soul most nearly 
attains the great end for which, when inspired by 
Poetic Sentiment, it struggles — the creation of supernal 
beauty." — Poe. 



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"Music is love in search of a word." 

— Lo rimer. 

"Music is the only one of the arts that does not 
corrupt the mind." — Montesquieu. 

"Music is the. greatest enchanter that ever trod the 
stage of time." — Prowse. 

"Music the fiercest grief can charm, 
And fate's severest rage disarm ; 
Music can soften pain to ease, 
And make despair and madness please ; 
Our joys below it can improve, 
And antedate the bliss above." 

— Alexander Pope 

"New forms may fold the speech, new lands 
Arise within these ocean portals 
But Music waves eternal wands, — ■ 
Enchantress of the souls of mortals." 

— Redman. 



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Music Recitals 

MISS MARIAN SHAW, SENIOR 

PIANO RECITAL 

Fantaisia in C minor Mozart 

Pracludinne Op. 10 No. 1 MacDozvell 

Shepherd's Hey Grainger 

Serenade in G. Minor Rubinstein 

The Cuckoo Avcnsky 

Ghosts Schytte 

Ballade in A flat Chopin 

MISS MARY ALLISON, SENIOR 

VOICE RECITAL 

Charmant Popillon (1710) Campra 

My Sweet Repose Schubert 

Devotion Schumann 

"Un bel di bedremo" Puecini 

O For a Burst of Song Allitsen 

Sing to Me, Sing Homer 

My Lover He Comes on the Skee Clough-Leighter 

MISS REBECCA DUGAN, JUNIOR 

VIOLIN RECITAL 

Copriecioso in E T. D. Williams 

June Barcarolle Tachaikowsky 

Adoration Borozvski 

Mazurka Mlynarski 

The Old Refrain Kreislcr 

Melodie Romantique Reed 

Douxienne Canzonetta Ambrosis 

Conecrto in D Seitz 

MISS VERA MELONE, JUNIOR 

PIANO RECITAL 

Sonata, Op. 27, No. 2 Beethoven 

En Couvant Godard 

Nocturne No. 3 Liszt 

Shadow Dance MacDowcll 

Romance, Op. 24, No. 9 Sibelius 

Scherzo, Op. 31 Cavlicr 




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Girls' Glee Club 

Someone has said that maids and music make a happy combina- 
tion. And this has proved itself true in the Girls' Glee Club. Pro- 
fessor Neuenschwander is the very efficient director and due to his 
efforts the girls ane going to give a very pleasing entertainment. The 
Club expects to take an eastern trip during the spring vacation in the 
interests of the College. 

Their program is as follows : 

PART I. 

Sing, Maiden, Sing Bocch 

By the Waters of Minnetonka Lienrancc 

Siren Voices Garbctt 

THE CLUB 

Violin Solo Capriccioso in E. 

MISS DUGAN 

Reading 

MISS KEBOCH 
DOUBLE QUARTET 

Piano Solo 

MISS SHAW 

Boat Song Ware 

Hymn to the Madonna Kremser 

THE CLUB 

PART II. 
Toy Symphony Romberg 

PART III. 

Smilin' Through Pciin. 

Mighty Lak a Rose Ncvin 

Little Mother of Mine Burleigh 

The Time of Roses Reichardt 

If I But Knew Smith 

De Coppah Moon SheUey 

Narcissus Nevin-Martel 

THE CLUB 




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Boys' Quartette 

The Boys' Quartette is the merry music makers of Muskingum 
which is, also one of the finest advertisements of the college. They 
make an extended tour during the summer vacation and many young 
people are led to choose Muskingum for their college career. 

Mr. Davis,- first tenor, is a Senior this year and has been a 
favorite singer here for four years. 

Mr. Moore, second tenor, is finishing college this year. He is 
the very pleasing reader of the club. 

Mr. Ralston, baritone, is with the quartette for his first year and 
has proved himself well both in his singing and as pianist. 

Mr. Morton, bass, is making good his first year and is a pleas- 
ing soloist on those very low notes. 



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The Girls' Trio 

The Girls' Trio is composed of three of our noted alumni. They 
give entertainments in the interests of the college during the summer 
and win many students for Muskingum. 

Miss Lucile Cosby, class of 1919, mezzo-soprano, is also an ac- 
complished pianist and reader. She represents Muskingum's pep in 
a true manner. 

Miss Ethel Peterson, class of 1919, lyric-soprano, possesses one 
of the most pleasing voices heard on the platform. 

Miss Beulah Grimes, class of 1921, contralto, pianist and reader, 
has a pleasing personality which is a drawing card for Muskingum. 



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Violin Festival 

One of the most delightful affairs of the school year is the May 
Violin Festival under the direction of Professor William Gray. The 
program usually requires two 'evenings and season tickets are at a 
premium. 

Last May the following program was rendered : 

FIRST ORCHESTRAL PROGRAM 

Overture to Ruy Bias Mendelssohn 

Nachstuck Schumenn 

Pastel ( Minuet Vif ) Paradis 

Serenade Roccoco (Pizzicato) Meyer-Hehmind 

Twilight Musings Longey 

Romance Op. 45 No. 1 Granfield 

(Intermission) 

Death of Joan of Arc B ember g 

Suite Romantique — A Day in Venice Nevin 

Overture — Semiramide Rossini 

SECOND ORCHESTRAL PROGRAM 

Overture — Herod Hadlcy 

Evening Mood Czerzvonky 

Columbine (A fancy dance) Smith 

Anbade Printaniere Lacombe 

Romance Wienawski 

Song of the Volga Boatmen Russia)! 

Fifth Symphony Tschaikowsky 

(Intermission) 

Symphonic Poem — Les Djinns Branch 

Miss Tomlinson and Orchestra 

Suite — Ballet of the Flowers, Part I Had ley 

Fantasia from "La Boheme" Puccini 



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The Choral Society 

The Choral Society of Muskingum is composed of more than 
one hundred voices. Two public recitals are given during the 
school year. Last spring the chorus sang "The Rose Maiden" and 
was assisted by artists from Columbus and Pittsburgh. Before the 
holiday vacation, "Elijah" was given. Professor Weis is the able 
director and he always puts across what he sets out to do. 

ASSISTING ARTISTS 

Jeanette B. Parker, Soprano Chauncey Parsons, Tenor 

Anne H. Woestehoff, Contralto George Kirk, Baritone. 

PART I 

Recitative Elijah 

Overture 

Chorus The People 

Duet with Chorus 

Recitative Obadiah 

Chorus The People 

Recitative and Air Elijah and the Widow 

Chorus The People 

Chorus and Elijah Priests of Baal 

Quartette Angels 

PART if 

Chorus The People 

Recitative Obadiah 

Air Elijah 

Trio Angels 

Recitative and Air Angel 

Recitative and Air Elijah 

Chorus Scripture 

Recitative Semi-Chorus * 

Arioso Elijah 

Quartette Scripture 

Chorus Scripture 




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Muskingum's Band 

Muskingum's Band is a good representative of Muskingum's 
pep. Altho it does not give formal recitals it is present at the 
games and helps stir up the spirit that is always present where Mus- 
kingum is. Under the leadership of Harold Giffen and the talent 
of the members, we think that our Band compares favorably even 
with Sousa's. 

The following pieces which they play are favorites : 



Rapasz Band March. 

T. O. H. Band March. 

P. I. C. O. 

Washington Post. 

16th Regiment. 

American Sandmen's March. 

Royal Romans. 

Longtone. 

Marching Men. 



On the Square. 
On Wisconsin. 
Fighting Men. 
The York Firemen. 
American Soldier. 
Fillmore's Triumphal. 
American Red Cross. 
Our Mascot 
Fidelity. 



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ARTIST RECITALS 

Heinrich Pfitzner March 15, 1921 

Carolyn Porter, Soprano October 4, 1921 



CLASS RECITALS 

SENIOR CLASS 

Ruth R. St. Clair, Pipe Organ March 17, 1921 

Ruth Larrick, Voice May 27, 1921 

Lucile Seright, Piano April 28, 1921 

Edythe Logan, Piano May 10, 1921 

Elizabeth Wiley, Piano May 20, 1921 

Martha Taggart, Violin May 5, 1921 

Oneta White, Violin August 1, 1921 

JUNIOR CLASS 

Marion Shaw April 12, 1921 

Mary Allison May 23, 1921 

Mabel Moore August 5, 1921 

GENERAL RECITALS 

Students' Recital February 2, 1921 

Students' Recital April 27, 1921 

May Violin Festival May 18, 19, 1921 

William Wylie, Tenor May 25, 1921 

Choral Society, "The Rose Maiden" June 8, 1921 

Men's Glee Club February 21, 1922 

Choral Society, "Elijah" January 19, 1922 

Students' Recital March 9, 1922 





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lit Book IV — Literary 



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The ceaseless patter of raindrops, 
On the old slate roof outside, 
Beats down with monotonous music, 
While I sail away on the tide 
Of memories, vague and distant — 
Till my schooner of fancy seems 
To carry me back to my childhood. 
To my beautiful castles of dreams. 

I travel to Crusoe's Island, 
To fish with him by the sea; 
I think of a cannibal redskin 
Concealed by the trunk of a tree, 
Till at last I get lonely and hungry, 
And I yearn for more elegant sights; 
Then I dine with the Caliph of Bagdad, 
As I read my Arabian Nights. 




DREAMS 



Then I stroll in the forest with Cooper 
I list to the murmuring trees, 
Telling all the great sorrows of ages 
On the soft whimp'ring sob Ol the breeze. 
With Uncas I'm captured liy rlurons; 
We camp by the great salt springs; 
Then I sit in the flickering firelight, 
At the council of Indian kings. 

Then I wander to scenes I have witnessed, 
And the mirror of memory shows 
The beautiful lake at Gerardmer 
Nestling there at the feet of the Yosges; 
Their blue tops tranquil and solemn 
All fade from sight, one by one, 
As my "Buddy" and I sit and watch them 
By the fast waning light of the sun. 



Then I sit awhile with Macaulay 

And he tells mc of Greece and of Rome: 

How the valiant sons of the priestess 

Established a permanent home; 

How the Tiber was closed to the Tuscans, 

Of the death of Virginia, the maid — 

Till I wish I could punish these lictors, 

And I wonder if I'd be afraid. 



When I think o fthe days that came after; 

Much sadder thoughts come to my mind, 

But most of the sorrow has vanished 

Leaving only the beauty behind. 

Those strange dark nights in the vattles 

No longer reality seem. 

But only fantastically wovcr> 

In the intricate mesh of my dream. 




Now at last I came back to the present, 
To think of the care and the pain — 
The portion of these who love money 
Too well for their ultimate gain. 
They never shall know of the beauty 
Of the transparent rivers and streams, 
That flow with a rippling mu>ic 
Through the wonderful country of dreams. 

B. D. Buchanan. '24. 



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Panama Canals and Poetry 



At the extreme rear of the old fashioned garden, two children were at- 
tempting to shape part of a large sand-pile into a miniature "Panama Canal." 
At frequent intervals, the work was halted, and a rythmical petition sung, or 
better chanted: 

"Rain, rain, go away, 
Come again another day." 

The young songsters did not seem to realize the unnecessariness of their 
request ; there was scarcely a cloud in the late-afternoon sky, and the garden 
had a somewhat parched appearance. 

In the next garden, hidden from the eyes of the children by a ten foot 
brick wall, sat two somewhat older children. Here, too, the call of the 
aesthetic seemed to have exerted itself. In a deep-seated rustic chair, a 
volume of Browning in her hand, sat the Young Lady. About ten feet away, 
in a similar chair, sat the Young Man. The Young Lady looked blissfully at 
ease. She seemed free from all care as she sat there, dressed in cool blue, 
reading aloud from the book in her hand. In contrast, her companies seemed 
to be in the midst of some sort of mental struggle ; he was leaning far for- 
ward, his head resting heavily in his hands, with a faint suspicion of perspira- 
tion on his forehead. The Young Man was irritated, to say the least; and 
why not? For several months his pulse, in the presence of the delicious young 
thing opposite him, had been growing more and more erratic. And now, after 
a night of restlessness, he had decided to make an open avowal of his desires 
and intentions, in the presence of their cause. Without doubt he had reason 
for nervousness. 

Would there never come an opportunity to speak? First it was that 
ridiculous noise from across the wall — then Browning — that checked him. 
The Young Man was near the breaking point. 

' "Rain, rain, go away — " ' 

"It was roses, roses all the way — ■" 

The Young Lady was interrupted by a growl from the bent figure op- 
posite her, which sounded a great deal like an impassioned reference to the 
well known property of tinkers. 

"What's that, Charlie? Why you were not listening to me. Why do 
you sit — " 

Although the Young Lady spoke in an audible tone, Charlie had heard 
only the angelic chorus from the neighboring garden. It began again for the 
nth time, 

' "Rain, rain — " ' 

"Well, sulk if you like! I'll read it once more: 

' "It was roses, roses all the way — ' " 
" 'Rain, rain—' " 



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The exasperated Charles started to his feet. "Oh, shut up! Will you? 

The girl's chin stiffened — if chins may be said to stiffen , she dropped 
her book, and in rising haughtily to her feet said, "So that's how you feel, is 
it? I—" 

The realization of having blundered greatly burst on the Young Man 
for the first time. Entirely abashed and apolegtic, he turned toward the girl. 
"Oh, what have I done? You surely don't think that I meant — " 

"I care nothing about what you have to say. After that, you must cer- 
tainly understand that our — friendship is at an end." 

"But, but—" 

The Young Lady turned abruptly and picked up her book. Droping 
into her chair, she apparently lost all interest in the world about her. 

"But, Grace, my dear Grace — " 

The Young Lady looked up from her book. Charles, too excited and 
abashed to see the forgiving look in her eyes, began once more : "Oh ! Why, 
my dear — " 

"Your dear? Oh! one minute you treat me like a brute and the next 
you say I am — am — your d-d-dear !" 

Searching his thoughts for a plan of reconciliation, Chailes was inter- 
rupted by a sound from the leafy branches behind him. In his embarrass- 
ment, he had not realized that his voice had risen somewhat above the accepted 
pitch for affairs of the heart. Neither had he noticed that the concert over 
the wall had ceased some moments before. On the top of the wall, almost 
hidden by the low hanging foliage, one of the "Panama engineers" was speak- 
ing in a loud whisper — "Sh, he's going to kiss her." 

Charles turned sharply. The Young Lady did not seem altogether ter- 
rorized by the latest announcement ; in fact, she was almost laughing. And 
when her brave cavalier at least started rather determinedly toward her, she 
did little more than duck her head expectantly. — Selah ! 





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It is worthy of note that the construction of the "Panama Canal" was 
postponed for a day, that the chief engineers might recuperate from an over 
dose of ice cream. "E. Phillips O'Maupassant." — '23. 



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"This Side of Paradise" 

"This Side of Paradise", (F. Scott Fitzgerald; Scribner's, 1920), being 
the experiences of Amory Blaine from childhood to manhood, is strikingly 
summed up in an epigram from Oscar Wilde — "Experience is the name so 
many give to their mistakes." F. S. Fitzgerald is a young author, just grad- 
uated from a University, and from freshness of experience admirably fitted to 
write the story. His style is the modern combination of novel, drama, and 
poetry, and the whole impression is one of pleasant stimulation through 
change of approach. 

Fitzgerald shows powerfully and briefly the inheritance of the boy, 
through descriptive sketches of his mother and home. Amory Blaine is a 
selfish, pampered youngster with a precocious development and maturity. He 
struggles through "prep" school and enters Princeton, very individualistic, 
ever handsome, and morally weak-willed, but by his eccentric tendencies 
makes several strong friendships with so-called poets, popular lions, and 
disciples of socialism and hedonism, all of whom though are more or less in- 
tellectual and think quite honestly on the deeper problems of existence as they 
meet them. After graduation, Amory's two years of active service do little 
more than to complete the indefinable transition from adolescence to man- 
hood. Amory returns from war a cynical pagan, tragically disillusioned and 
passionately anxious for adventure. His engagement to the only girl that 
really awoke him from his sluggish egotism and made him forget himself 
is broken by the girl on the ground of his comparative poverty. In conse- 
quence, he goes through an embittered revolt, and after apparently wrecking 
his future, starts out again for Princeton, hoping there to find himself and get 
a fresh, sane start. The closing scene reveals Amory on a hilltop, in sight of 
the University, his arms upraised, whispering, "At last, I have found myself — " 

The strongest feature of the book is the delineation of character. That 
is the central theme of the whole story and is strongly developed. But the 
ending is very weak : Amory does not know himself and is advanced for the 
better onlv in the knowledge of his own ignorance. To read a story without 
a cut-and-dried finish is quite refreshing, however, — the reader's imagination 
is stimulated. Again, there is not an admirable woman in the book — not one 
that one instinctively respects. Whether this is a criticism of the age or a per- 
sonal prejudice of Mr. Fitzgerald is a moot question, but the fact remains that 
even the collective girl of the story has few approved attributes. This should 
be recognized as one of the difficulties of environment under which Amory 
labored, for he labored under many in inheritance, temperament, and environ- 
ment. To be sure he did not labor very consciously — and right here is the 
big point of the book: Amory Blaine is the personification of a strongly dis- 
tinctive type of honest-seeking, hard-thinking young men of today, and as 
such is open to any amount of criticism, for it is inevitable that he make 
enemies, especially among the conservative, reactionary classes. But a ma- 
lignment of Fitzgerald on that score is patently mistaken judgment. Every- 
thing in the book is a true and graphic picture of a certain tvpe of this gener- 
ation. The author sketched a character so dramatically that the orthodox 
world rose up and in their blindness damned him, instead of the living model 
of his work. Their protest is a tribute to the ability of Mr. Fitzgerald. "This 
Side of Paradise" is a stirring book and possesses that crowning merit — a grip- 
ping intensity which brings one back to it again and again. 

Robin Morton, '23. 



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The Delights of Being Rushed 

There are two remarks I thoroughly enjoy making. One of them is, 
"Well, I can't bluff. If I don't know a thing, I don't know it, and that's 
the end of it." The other is — "O, this awful rush of things. Oh, for peace 
and quiet !" Now, neither of these remarks is sincere, much as they seem to 
be and in spite of the virtuous air with which the first is given, and the long- 
suffering sigh accompanying the latter. In the first place, I can bluff, you 
know, in a dire extremity, as well as anyone. Now, don't misunderstand me. 
Of coudse I seldom feel called upon to do so, but, (and I hope this frank rev- 
elation meets with fitting appreciation,) I can tell a fair amount of facts about 
a subject of which I know nothing when called upon by fate, and would feel 
myself lacking in many respects, if I were not able so to do. In the second 
place, I don't long for peace and quiet and I enjoy a rush. In fact I would 
consider that I was missing" half of the joy of living if I were not rushed most 
of the time. So, you see that I have been giving a wrong impression, and now 
that the truth is out at last, concerning these two statements, may I proceed 
to a short appreciation of the rush of which I have feigned disapproval here- 
tofore? 

History is full of disasters caused from the fact that people were not 
rushed enough. Lot's wife would never have turned into a pillar of salt if 
she had been rushed as is the modern college girl. Antony would never have 
lost his empire if he had been kept too busy to waste so much time looking 
at Cleopatra. So on, from Adam and Eve in the garden, down to the Kaiser, 
we find that folks who aren't kept busy most of the time get into mischief. 
And having established thus firmly the historical basis for my subject, I pro- 
ceed without any pangs of consciene, to the delights of being rushed, as 1 see 
them. 

The years have brought me many heart-rending experiences, but the 
most heart-rending have been those wherein I seemd to be confronted with 
a future of endlss time in which there was nothing to do ! I can't imagine 
a worse out-look for any person. If it were not a temporary feeling, I fear I 
would not be here to pen this tale ; but fortunately it soon passes and we see 
the future rosy-tinted again because we see work and play, and plenty of each 
to rush the hours along. "I abhore rest, I embrace work", says some truly 
perceiving soul. Who would cry for peace and quiet when we might have 
each golden moment of the day filled to the brim. To lie in bed in the early 
morning hours, and plan each hour of the day ; then to lie down at night with 
the knowledge that rest is well-earned — Oh! where is there sweeter joy! I 
believe I shall have reached the acme of joy when I come to the place where 
I think it absolutely necessary for me to stay up all night to finish my mani- 
fold duties. That indeed would be bliss! How completely rushed one would 
feel! 

There is only one bad feature about life's rush ; that is, that it comes 
when one has "lazy streaks" as well as when one is energetically inclined. 
Perhaps, tho, not everyone has "lazy streaks." I have been sadly and copious- 
ly inflicted with them, since a child (the family's dictum), and they will prob- 
ably work final destruction for me some time. The rush continues whether we 
are lazy or energegtic, however, as I said, and this is its worst feature. 

However, may I not, with due respect for the "Simple Life" and "The 
Value of Quiet," put in a kindly word of appreciation for "The Delights of 
Being Rushed?" 

Velma Moss, '22. 



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Muskingum — A Real College 

As we have noted the expansion of Muskingum during the past few 
years, we have begun to ask ourselves, "Is Muskingum College going to de- 
velop into a university or is it going to remain a school of liberal arts — a real 
college?" Probably, before going farther into the discussion, it would be best 
to distinguish between the university and the real college. 

The university remains, in the essential purpose of its existence, an 
institution for advanced graduate, technical, or professional study. While a 
university may be a "complex of colleges,' 'it is essentially much more than 
that. True enough, it should give a liberal education and prepare practitioners 
for the various professions ; but its keynote, in addition to the liberalization 
of the mind, must be the spirit of specialization, research, discovery of new 
truths and new applications of old truths, and the diffusion of knowledge, 
particularly in the institutions we represent, in the service of the State and the 
Nation. Even at the present time, Muskingum seems to be deevloping into 
a university — a complex of colleges. Shall Muskingum be divided into a num- 
ber of separate colleges, such as a College of Agriculture, a College of Oratory, 
a College of Education, and the like; or shall it, in the years to come, still be a 
real college? 

As for the college, there must me an institution that will carry youth- 
hood forward from the work completed in the high school to the point of ma- 
utrity and knowledge which will find him prepared for the specialization of the 
graduate college in the university. The institution which fills this gap is the 
college. That it has been a most important institution in our educational sys- 
tem is evidenced by part accomplishment in the production of men and women 
of cultured lives and effective service. These past accomplisments have been 
possible because a college really is a foundation builder, a school of discipline 
and culture. 

We are too prone to rest in mere knowledge of facts. Of course, it is 
easier to teach the student facts than to train him to think, and the big schools 
and large classes make the problem still more difficult. If Muskingum would 
be satisfied with a limit of seven hundred and fifty students, it would be pos- 
sible for those who teach to impress their personalities upon the students in 
a way so strongly inspirational that the fires of zeal for true culture may be 
kindled from embers of heredity into bright, glowing flames of self-activity. 

Then, again, the students in the real college are democratic. In the 
large institution, bigness is the foe to democracy. In the real college, where 
every student knows every other student, the numbers are not large enough 
to permit the formation of cliques on unnatural lines. Why is it that when 
the alumni come back today they say that the old "Muskingum Spirit" is 
dying out? We know that it is true, for even within the last three years it 
has been plainly visible that Muskingum's old time spirit is on the decline. Is 
this because of the increase in numbers, which arc breaking up the homo- 
geneity of the Muskingum family? 

The authorities of the large universities with college departments are 
coming to recognize the great advantage that the real college enjoys, on ac- 
count of its limited numbers, for the development of true democracy. The 
real college, standing for a nobility of character, is exclusive in the matters of 
numbers and in standards of scholarship and life. Why not keep Muskingum 
College a real college, and thus uphold the highest standard of scholarship 
and personality? 

James F. Allison, Editor-in-Chief. 



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The Aretean Literary Society 

Not many years after the founding of our college, a number 
of girls who were interested in making a "better" Muskingum, 
organized themselves into a Literary Society which they named 
the Erodelphians. For a few years the society did most excellent 
work, but for some reason or other, gradually grew smaller and 
smaller and most of its members united with the men's society, 
the Philomatheans. This plan must not have been entirely sat- 
isfactory, for it was not long until some of the more independent 
of the fair ones, succeded in reorganizing the old society and in 
making a new start in the world as "Areteans." The Aretean 
Society can be justly proud of being the first successful Women's 
Literary Society at Muskingum. 

From the very beginning of this organization, success has 
been inevitable and for many years this has been the largest Lit- 
erary Society we have. This year it has had the largest mem- 
bership it has ever known, having gone far over the one hun- 
dred mark. 

But mere numbers can never measure the worth of an or- 
ganization, and the Areteans do not have to base their reputation 
on the size of their society. In recent years they have contin- 
ued to rank high in all contests and have for the last two years 
produced the winners of the Brown Oratorical Contest. We can 
say of the Areteans that they are all-round Muskingum girls. 



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The Erodelphian Literary Society 

To a multitude of people scattered throughout this old world 
of ours, the word "Erodelphian" brings the memory of many 
busy but happy Friday nights in the Hall of the first Women's 
Literary Society in Muskingum. It is true that for a few -years 
near the founding of the organization, the Erodelphians had to 
struggle hard to keep alive, but for many student generations 
there has been no one who could not say that the society is very 
much alive. 

The Erodelphians are interested in a higher literary and 
social life for Muskingum women and have succeeded in realiz- 
ing their aim, at least for many of them. 

This society has been especially successful in recent years in 
their play productions. The plays given have been of a high 
standard and the casts have been well chosen and trained. The 
contribution thus made to the literary life of Muskingum has 
been decidedly worthwhile and we can truly St*y that the 
Erodelphians hold an important place among the organizations 
of Muskingum. 



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The Philomathean Literary Society 

Even in the days of "small beginning", when the most hope- 
ful Muskingumites scarcely dared dream of today's Muskingum, 
the Philomathean Literary Society began to make itself felt as a 
live organization on our Campus. Nor can we say that the So- 
ciety now lacks any of its original enthusiasm, for today it can 
boast of being the largest of the two men's societies and of 
counting among its members the most talented of Muskingum's 
young men. 

In all of the College's Literary Contests, the Philomatheans 
are leaders. This year the society is represented on the debate 
squad and is particularly proud that for three years the college 
orator has been chosen from among its members. The Philo- 
matheans deserve much credit for the production "The Arrival 
of Kitty", which was one of the most successful events of the 
year. 

Ask a Philomathean how many Literary Societies there are 
in school and he will probably reply "One — the Philo". Though 
most of the students would scarcely say that, yet we must, in jus- 
tice, say that the Society is a wide-awake and progressive organ- 
ization. If we can base predictions for the future on the present, 
we can foretell that the Philomatehean Literary Society will al- 
ways be a leader in the progress of Muskingum. 







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The Union Literary Society 

Back in 1836 in the days when Lincoln was a young man 
struggling for an education, and the other leaders who were to 
pilot the Union through its darkest days were studying in dif- 
ferent colleges throughout the land, a group of Academy boys 
in New Concord established the Union Literary Society. 

In those days what the young men lacked in education was 
made up in earnestness and ambition ; hence the society was pre- 
destined to be a success. The society was well attended and 
through the early years of the college it continued to grow. 

Union Literary Society will always point with pride to the 
names of D. A. McClenahan, who was for htirty-five years a 
member of the faculty of Pittsburgh Seminary, Dr. W. R. Harper, 
formerly President of the University of Chicago, and W. O. 
Thompson, President of Ohio State University, who were, during 
their college days, members of this society. 

The U. L.'s are now in their new home, a beautifully furnish- 
ed hall in which their weekly meetings are held. Each week the 
members strive to prepare a worth-while program and so hope 
to receive training that will be valuable to them in their future 
life. This society has furnished many members for the Varsity 
debate squads. It is true that for a few years the membership 
decreased, but this year a special effort was made to revive in- 
terest. There is a large enrollment of new members and the 
Union Literary Society looks forward to many successful years. 



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Literary Societies in Muskingum 

Traditions in our college life have always meant much to every col- 
lege student and in Muskingum the traditions of our Literary Societies have 
always had a leading place in the lives of those who have been connected with 
them during their college life. While it is true that the Literary Societies 
have not always meant all that they could mean to every Muskingumite, yet 
we can not but realize that through their long years of existence they have 
made many beneficial and enduring contributions to the best life of Mus- 
kingum. 

The four Literary Societies were organized with the purpose of bring- 
ing to Muskingum students an "opportunity to develop their literary ability" 
and to infuse into their college life an appreciation of the most worth while 
of literary achievements in the past as well as the present. But the organiza- 
tions have come to mean vastly more than that for which they were instituted. 
They have indeed offered opportunities for developing the individuals who 
avail themselves of these opportunities, and they have gone farther, in that 
through them have the college ideals been perpetrated. No loyal Literary 
Society man will ever be found lacking in that "Muskingum Spirit" which is 
really an incentive in all of them. 

Literary societies offer means for development that no college course 
ever gave. Here many friends are made during the years of college life. 
Mutual interests are discovered in the work of the societies which nothing but 
close association here could ever reveal. Not only do members of certain 
classes learn to know each other, but through the social life as well as regular 
literary work, the upper classmen learn to know the lower classmen in a way 
that no other part of the college life affords. The personalities of individual 
students become much better known, and all become welded into one big fam- 
ily working together for the interests of each other and for all Muskingum. 

Muskingum alumni have, through the Literary Societies, handed down 
to the present and future students a heritage which is most worthy of their 
preservation and which we appreciate. Having stood the test for so many 
years, the Societies cannot afford to stand still but must go on making each 
year better than the preceding one. In the days of the realization of the 
"Greater Muskingum", let us keep alive those traditions which have so greatly 
contributed to that realization. The Literary Societies rank among the first 
among such institutions, and are pressing on to much larger and better things 
for Muskingum. 



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The Black and Magenta 

The first student publication at Muskingum was a monthly magazine 
called the "Argus." Later the "Argus" gave way to the "Black and Magenta," 
edited once each month by the literary societies and the faculty. In May, 
1914, the "Black and Magenta" became a weekly paper, and since that time 
has been published as such. 

In recent years under direction of such editors as Martha Aiken, Bruce 
Wilson, and Thomas Pollock, the present editor, the "Black and Magenta" has 
become one of the leading college papers in the state. It is how made up of 
from eight to ten pages and has a circulation well over one thousand. 

As an organ of student expression, the "Black and Magenta" has exer- 
cised a wholesome and helpful effect in shaping student opinion. The edi- 
torial work has dealt with practical student problems and played a promi- 
nent part in the creation of the Muskingum Student Council. 

Appointments to the staff are now made by the Board of Control in 
cooperation with the department of journalism. The minor staff positions are 
filled from a large list of applicants from the classes in English and Journal- 
ism. Students desiring this type of work are required to submit practical work 
on news assignments before they are given consideration. The Junior and 
Senior classes are each required to edit an issue of the "Black and Magenta." 
These feature numbers contain such matter as the classes deem worthy of 
publication, including poems, short stories, essays, and class write-ups. 

Part of the success of this year's paper is a result of the helpful criti- 
cisms and suggestions given by Prof. J. B. McKinney of the English Depart- 
ment. 

THE BLACK AND MAGENTA 

(Member of Ohio College Press Association) 

Editor-in-Chief Thomas C. Pollock, '22 

Editorial Staff — 

Assistant Editor Donald Daugherty, '23 

Assistant Editor Josephine Killough, '23 

News Reporter Mildred Galloway, '24 

News Reporter Bryan Buchanan, '24 

Social Reporter Mary Allison, '22 

Literary Reporter Esther Gillogly, '22 

Joke Reporter Margaret Pollock, '24 

Exchange Reporter Helen Cleland, '22 

Alumni Reporter Hugh Kelsey, '23 

Assistant Alumni Reporter __. Prof. T. H. Paden, '73 

Athletic Reporter Harold Brownlee, '22 

Assistant Athletic Reporter Virgil Cosby, '23 

Academy Reporter Elizabeth Watson 

Business Management — 

Business Manager J. Paul Graham, '22 

Assistant Business Manager Henry Gegler, '24 

Circulation Manager Horace Giffen, '22 

Publicity Manager Charles Aikin, '24 

Assistant Circulation Manager John E. Irvine, '23 

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B. & M. Board of Control 

The Black and Magenta, published weekly by a staff elected 
from the student body, is under the direction of a Board of Con- 
trol which consists of two faculty members and one representa- 
tive from each College class. This Board determines the policy 
of the paper, elects the staff, retains an oversight in the manage- 
ment, and assists in developing new plans looking toward the 
progress of the B. & M. Its meetings are held on the second 
Tuesday of each month at 3.30, at which time there is a report 
from the Business Manager and Editor in Chief, and a general 
discussion as to the interests of the publication. The present 
membership of the Board is H. A. Kelsey, D. D., chairman ; 
Miss Mary Sharp; Chas. Hussey, '22; Philip Kyle, '23; Stewart 
Parker, '24; Paul Montgomery, '25; Eugene Martin, M. A., '22. 

The past year has been one of marked success both in the 
business and circulation departments, and in the editorial work of 
the paper. 



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Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 

The aim of the Y. M. C. A. in Muskingum is to make possi- 
ble the development of men who shall be prepared to meet the 
challenge of life not only as they meet it on the campus, but when 
they go out into the world. 

The purpose of the Association is to strengthen conviction 
and to produce a fearlessness in standing for those things which 
they know to be right. 

The administration is in the hands of officers, chairmen 
and committee members who comprise the Friendship Council. 

All student interests are the vital concern of the Y. M. C. A. 
It is so far reaching in its effect that the spirit of the Association 
extends throughout the whole group of college men. In the be- 
lief that emphasis on the spiritual values of life make for a greater 
usefulness, the Y. M. C. A. touches the life of every man in 
school, thus opening a new channel for Muskingum's forward 
march with the Conquering Christ. 



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Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 

It is the purpose of the Y. W. C. A. in Muskingum to create 
an atmosphere of true friendship which they believe is to be found 
only through knowing the Great Friend. It is the dream of the 
Association that each girl may find in the life of the Association 
the stimulation and inspiration which shall help her to realize to 
the fullest extent her God-giving possibilities. 

The work is organized so as to include everything from the 
Religious meeting to Self Help Department. The responsibility 
is placed in Committee Chairmen who supervise and direct the 
work of their respective departments. 

It is the fond hope of the Y. W. C. A. that in the new Mus- 
kingum the same spirit of co-operation may prevail and that even 
greater things may be possible in Him. Symetrical Christian 
womanhood is the keynote of the Association which strives in 
all things to be of service to the girls of the campus. 



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The Student Volunteer Group 

"It is my purpose if God permit to serve Him on the Foreign 
Field" — is the pledge which this group has signed. Theirs is a 
singleness of purpose and a deep devotion to His Cause. 

The Volunteers are very active in keeping the interest in 
people of the world before the student body. Large delegations 
attend the various Student Volunteer Conventions. Muskingum 
has long been known for her vital interest in the furthering of 
Christ's kingdom in the Foreign Field. 

The Volunteers meet each Sabbath morning to discuss prac- 
tical problems of Christian living as well as conditions in the 
Great Mission centers. 

Muskingum has already sent volunteers who keep in close 
touch with these students who have the like purpose to serve 
Him abroad. The Volunteer Group is one of Muskingum's old- 
est and most cherished groups and we hope that in the new Mus- 
kingum the Volunteers will continue to be as vital a part of her 
student life. 



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The Gospel Team 

The Y. M. C. A. in Muskingum has caught a real vision of 
service and one of its expressions is the Gospel Team Group. 
This Group is made up of clean-cut college men who are anxious 
to serve God not only on their own campus, but in other fields 
of service. 

The team is subdivided into smaller groups which go out on 
week end trips to conduct services in towns and cities of the 
state. Their purpose is to create a deeper interest in Christ and 
His Kingdom and to lead others to follow Him. 

They are enthusiastic about the work and insist that great 
benefits come to them. It will readily be seen that this practical 
training will be of no mean value to those who expect to enter 
definite Christian work, for it places them in close touch with 
existing problems and acquaints them in a measure with a view- 
point for solution. The Gospel Team is just another one of the 
many facilities which Muskingum offers her students for develop- 
ment of true Christian leadership. 



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Student Honor Council 

One of Muskingum's oldest and most valued traditions is her 
Honor System which is not a system whose purpose it is to 
hunt offenders and punish them, but to create a campus atmos- 
phere of honor which will make impossible a dishonest act. 

The Administration is in the hands of students, four Seniors, 
three Juniors, two Sophomores, and one Freshman who comprise 
the Council. 

The Honor System applies to all work in and for the class 
room. The pledge is — "I pledge my honor that I have neither 
given nor received aid in this work." 

The Honor System would seek to so place the student on 
his honor that the word honor will come to be a living force in 
his life. The training in responsibility is a part of the great Mus- 
kingum ideal for building manhood and womanhood — which is 
that we trust each other so thoroughly that the trust is too sac- 
red to be violated. Muskingum men and women are men and 
women of honor. 



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Club 



This year has been a period of transition in the Science De- 
partments as well as in other branches of Muskingum's life. 
While the Club cannot point to as much tangible achievement 
this year, yet no one will deny that this has been the greatest year 
for Science in Muskingum. 

The Departments of Chemistry and Geology are functioning 
now as distinct units and the new courses which have been 
offered have been more than popular. 

The Department of Botany has received special emphasis 
this year and some very interesting field work has been done. 

Agriculture received a new impetus under the efficient lead- 
ership of Prof. Johns. The School of Agriculture for local farm- 
ers was a remarkable achievement. 

The department of Home Economics in its enlarged quarters 
is functioning in an even more vital way than before. 

The plans for the coming year are very interesting and we 
predict that with the enlarged faculty and increased facilities 
and larger eligibility that the Science Club will be a real factor 
next year. 



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French Club 

The club provides a practical means for the student to gain 
a real working knowledge of French. It is not only valuable 
training but is the source of much entertainment. 
The officers are : 

President Rachel Loughridge 

Vice-President Arthur Reed 

Secretary Virginia Morrow 

Treasurer Elizabeth Dumm 

A part of each meeting is spent in general conversation and 
such games as panier aux fruits (fruit basket), je pense a quelque 
chase (I am thinking of something), les auteurs (authors). The 
hour ends with a short formal program of recitations, songs or 
brief talks on some special subject. One of the most enjoyable 
meetings was that of January sixteenth when each member re- 
sponded to roll-call with an anecdote, song or reading in French. 



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Spanish Club 

The club in its bi-monthly meetings attempts to forget Mus- 
kingum for a while and just live in a Spanish World. If interest 
is an index to popularity, the club is greatly appreciated. 

The officiers for the year are : 
1st Semester — 2nd Semester — 

Murl Johnson President Paul Eakin President 

Howard Clark Secretary Bess Williams Secretary 

The following is a translation of a program given by the 
Spanish Club : — 

Answer to roll call with a Spanish proverb. 

Short business meeting. 

Current events paper. 

Music. 

Five minute talk on assigned topic. 

Short sketch. 

Games. 

Music. 



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Keystone Club 

"Pennsylvania Forever ! 
Wonderful Keystone State 
Beautiful all and glorious, 
None of thee desolate — 

Pennsylvania dear and grand 
Pennsylvania our own land, 
Pennsylvania Forever, 
Our own state !" 

All these people have lived in Pennsylvania — now live in 
Pennsylvania or so love Pennsylvania that they hope to live 
there. 

There is a feeling of a great common interest among Penn- 
sylvanians. So great is their own unity that they know how to 
work together, and wherever they are (though they thrill to 
Pennsylvania), they are loyal to Muskingum, the College in 
Ohio. 



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The Empire Club 

Dr. J. Campbell White said in Chapel one day, — "Dr. Mont- 
gomery, I found myself telling a New Yorker the other day that 
judging from his description of the type of institution to which 
he wished to send his boy, Muskingum College was the place." 
We do not know whether these Empire state people came upon 
similar recommendation but they have made loyal Muskingum 
students. 

The Empire Club is made up of real manhood and women- 
hood and if these are true representatives we see one justifica- 
tion for calling the state — Empire State. 

The purpose is similar to other state clubs and it is proving 
so popular that some representatives of other states have con- 
sented to join the Empire Club by adoption. 



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The West Virginia Club 

"I'm from the mountains I am." This is the slogan which 
unites the jolly West Virginians. The representation from West 
Virginia is increasing each year and this organization purposes 
to be the means whereby these sturdy mountaineers may know 
each other and together show Muskingum what loyal West Vir- 
ginians can do. 

The versatility of the talents of the mountaineers is very ap- 
parent in her Muskingum representatives — Our Athletic Coach, 
many outstanding athletes, and some of our most popular vocal 
artists consistently defend their native state against unapprecia- 
tive "aliens" remaining constantly true to the sign of the 
"snake." 



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Cambridge- Muskingum Club 

Cambridge, a neighboring city, makes an astonishingly large 
contribution to Muskingum College in real students. In order 
that the Muskingum Spirit may be vital to these people they 
have organized the Cambridge-Muskingum Club to boost Mus- 
kingum both here and in their home city. 

Miss Stone, of the faculty, who wrote the Pageant for "Old 
Home Week" in Cambridge this year, furnishes the impetus for 
promotion of mutual interests of Cambridge and Muskingum 
which is of real value to both. 







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Illinois Club 

Illinois, our Prairie State, is one of the three most level 
states in the Union. The geography of the state seems to have 
stamped itself upon its products, for the prairie folk are on the 
level. Just as its climate varies, so it boasts wide diversities in 
inhabitants from a noisy Helen Burns to a reserved Dale Mc- 
Kibben. 

You can recognize other Ilinois boosters by — "Now in 
Chicago." 

Muskingum truly is the great meeting place for widely 
scattered people and she is glad to see such a promising Prairie 
product. 



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Advisory Board of the Y. W. C. A. 

The power of an organization can not always be traced to 
most apparent sources. This is true of the Y. W. C. A. — for cer- 
tainly much of the stabilitly, foresight and farseeing vision is 
due to the ability of the advisory board who in a measure are 
powers behind the throne. 

The Board has had a distainct loss this year in the death 
of one of the most influential and widely loved members, Mrs. J. 
G. Lowery. The descriptive phrase which most nearly describes 
her is queenly womanhood. She was vitally interested in the 
Association and took an active part in its work. The memory of 
her joyful spirit cannot fail to shine forth in the Y. W. C. A. 

The type of womanhood which this board leprescnts must 
indeed do much to shape the policy of the Y. \V. C. A. in the 
best channels which is the purpose of this group. 




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Stag Club 



Founded 1909 



Shadyside Terrace 



OFFICERS 

President Ross S. Wilson 

Vice President Paul Eugene Hutchman 

Recording Secretary R. Hawthorne Rockwell 

Corresponding Secretary Ralph A. Peacock 

Treasurer Christian F. Kenneweg 

YE SCROLL 

Seniors — 1922 
Ross S. Wilson Paul Eugene Hutchman 

Robert M. Wilson Charles A. Dittmar 

Charles L. Hussey Harold S. Brownlee 

Thomas Clark Pollock Ralph W. Peacock 

Willard D. Campbell Ollie E. Fink 

Juniors — 1923 

J. Everett McClenahan William Lees 

Virgil M. Cosby R. Hawthorne Rockwell 

William N. Shane R. Paul Burns 

John Fred Bell J. Clifford Jeffers 

J. Dale McKibben Dana W. Cox 

Christian F. Kenneweg Robin Morton (pledge) 

Sophomores — 1924 
J. Charles Aiken Louis Hatch 

Harold F. Mosher James D. Brown (pledge) 

Henry S. Gegler Newton W. Hutchison (pledge) 

Clark M. Furbee (pledge) 

Freshmen (pledges) — 1925 
R. Blair Hastings McClain Post 

Clifford C. Nicely Harry B. Trace 

Virgil A. Wallace 



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Delta Gamma Theta 

OFFICERS 

President Virginia Gibbon 

Vice President Agnes Morehead 

Secretary Mildred Kebooh 

Treasurer Frances Barton 

FACULTY PATRONESSES 



Miss Luella Pollock 



Miss Claire McKelvev 



Virginia Gibbon 
Helen Cleland 



Agnes Morehead 
trances Barton 



Feme Chambers 
Dorothy Campbell 
Grace Morris 
Margaret Pollock 



Floy Bauder 
Anabel Day 
Martha Wilson 
Mary Pyles (pledge) 
Doris Powell (pledge) 



Miss Edna Hosick 

MEMBERS 
Class of 1922 

Class of 1923 

Mary Alexander 
Class of 1924 



Grace Watson 



Bernice Boyd 
Martha Morrison 



Hazel Miller 
Mildred Koboch 



.Louise Brownlee 
Velma Brewer 
Virginia Wallace 
Margaret McKee 



Class of 1925 

Frieda MacMillan (pledge) 
Betty McMaster (pledge) 
June Stoneburner (pledge) 
Ann Fraser (pledge) 
Alice Montgomery (pledge) 



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Sphinx 

Founded in 1912 

OFFICERS 

President Lloyd Fife 

Vice President Delbert Gray 

Treasurer Joseph Fitzwater 

Recording Secretary George Crouch 

Corresponding Secretary Timothy Fitzwater 

Historian Frank Reed 

Sergeant-at-Arms Raymond Young 

MEMBERS IN COLLEGE 

Nineteen Twenty-two 
C. Maxwell Myers Lloyd B. Fife 

G. Delbert Gray Joseph K. Fitzwater 

Nineteen Twenty-three 
Maynard C. Allen James P. Fitzwater 

Robert D. Moore J. Murl Johnston 

Joseph M. Hutchison Frederic Campbell 

Nineteen Twenty-four 
George M. Crouch Berwick C. Barton 

John R. Keach James D. Root 

Raymond S. Young Maurice C. Chase 

Frank M. Reed Deane W. Grimes 

Ned O. Henry *|James T. Downie 

Timothy Fitzwater 

Nineteen Twenty-five 
Charles J. Bradley R. Ralston Kerr 

Glenn Adams Lewis R. Brown 

William Adams 



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F. A. D. Club 

OFFICERS 

President Martha Goodv« in 

Vice President Ruth Deselm 

Secretary Mary E. White 

Treasurer Helen Cochard 

Patroness Mrs. Feme Parsons Layton 

Class of 1922 
Heln< Flesher Helen Wright 

Helen Cochard 

Class of 1923 
Mary Hood Helen Espy 

Bess Williams Elizabeth McGill 

Virginia Lowther Maxa Bradley 

Martha Goodwin Lucille Adams (pledge) 

Class of 1924 
Mary E. White Helen Hyde 

Ruth Deselm Lois Timmons 

Audrey Kelley Frances Lyle 

Virginia Morrow Anna Shane 

Margaret McFadden Martha Stevenson 

Class of 1925 
Vivian Goodwin Lucilia Evans (pledge) 

Dorothy Milligan Helen Glessner (pledge) 

hJvira Wright Margaret Gillespie (pledge) 

Edith Williams Elsie Moore (pledge) 

Mary Wells (pledge) 




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Stoic Club 

Founded — 1918 

President Ralph A. Laughlin 

Vice President Cary B. Graham 

Secretary Frank W. McGuire 

Treasurer Wendell R. Mintier 

MEMBERS 



Albert Gregg- 
Ralph A. Laughlin 

Cary B. Graham 
James A. Pringle 
James A. Weyer 



Class of 1922 

Frank W. McGuire 
J. Rodney Shaw 

Class of 1923 

Wendell R. Mintier 
James Fleming 
Howard Clark, Jr. 

Guy A. Hannon 

Class of 1924 



Harlan McGregor (pledge) Bryan Buchanan 



John A. Bell 
Howard W. Peterson 
James M. Walton 
Martin Giffen 
Eugene McConnell 



Class of 1925 

Alex Sneddon (pledge) 
Rrthur A. Hunt 
Robert Crawford (pledge) 
Dwight Gray (pledge) 
R. J. Marshall (pledge) 



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Book VI — Oratory 




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Prof. Layton 

The department of Oratory is one of 
the most popular in Muskingum Col- 
lege. This is due to the fact that at 
its head stands Professor Layton — a 
man who is the very quintessence of 
efficiency. His reputation for having 
the ability to make students work hard 
is widely known, and this accounts for 
the creation of the class-room atmos- 
phere which makes it impossible for an 
idler to survive. But the best part of 
it all is that the students are willing to 
work hard for Professor Layton be- 
cause they realize the inestimable 
worth and value of intensive study un- 
der his guidance. Because of his own 
endurance, untiring effort, and enthus- 
iastic personality, Professor Layton is able to impart to his stu- 
dents some of his own conviction that clear, forceful, and attrac- 
tive speech is absolutely essential for efficient participation in 
any phase of the world's activity. 

Then, too, Muskingum's Department of Oratory owes its 
fame in no small degree to the persevering and assiduous en- 
deavors of Mrs. Layton whose thorough and convincing teach- 
ing is an inspiration to Muskingum students and whose charm, 
graciousness, and winsome personality endear her to all who arc- 
so fortunate as to know her. 

Thus Muskingum's Department of Oratory, as it finds ex- 
pression in recitals, plays, intercollegiate debates and oratorical 
contests, owes its splendid success to the combined leadership of 
Mr. and Mrs. Layton and we arc persuaded that this Department 
of our college is adequately measuring up to its share of the re- 
sponsibility of realizing our dream of an Even Greater Mus- 
kingum. 




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Oratory Graduates 

Muskingum's School of Expression is still comparatively new but with- 
in the last student generation it has grown with a marvelous rapidity and 
each year sees more students enrolled in that department. In fact, although 
the courses here offered are elective, a small percentage of students go through 
four years of college at Muskingum without delving somewhat into the de- 
partment of Oratory. 

Among our seniors this year there are five who have fulfilled the re- 
quirements and who will receive a diploma from The School of Expression. 
The recitals given this year have been representative of the best in Modern 
Drama and have shown unusual dramatic ability on the part of the graduates. 

"MILESTONES" by Knoblouch and Arnold Bennett was presented by 
Miss Velma Moss. It is a story of the reluctance with which the old sur- 
renders to the new. 

"STRONGHEART," DeMille's drama of college life and race dis- 
tinction was given by Miss Temima Ford. 

Miss Margaret Miller read J. Hartley Manner's "HAPPINESS." This 
play is a novel presentation of the theme that real happiness always consists 
in selfless service to our fellowmen. 

Miss Virginia Gibbon did credit to "WHAT EVERY WOMAN 
KNOWS" which reveals woman's important place in man's success, in the 
charming manner characteristic of James M. Barrie. 

Mr. T. Clarke Pollock chose for his recital "A DEVIL'S DISCIPLE" 
by Bernard Shaw. In this drama Shaw's thesis is: all human beings are made 
up of good and bad tendencies. 



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Tau Kappa Alpha 

The first sub-chapter of Tau Kappa Alpha to be established in Ohio was 
in Muskingum College in 1911. This is purely an honorary fraternity. The 
membership is limited to those who particularly distinguish themselves in 
Oratory and Debate. The Gold Key of the fraternity is of national signifi- 
cance and some of the greatest orators of the day are numbered among its 
members. 

The wearer of the gold key is distinguished, in having received the highest 
honor that can be given to anyone in the United States in oratory. Member- 
ship in this national organization requires more work than any other inter- 
collegiate activity and therefore the key has a special significance. This is 
not only a mark of achievement while in college, but for life. 

ROLL OF THE MUSKINGUM COLLEGE CHAPTER OF T K A 



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J. Knox Montgomery 




A. B. Cunningham 


13 


Wm. Martin 


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Charles R. Layton 




S. C. Britton 


13 


J. S. Stoner 


'18 




Ray K. Immell 




C. M. Adams 


14 


R. W. Gibson 


'18 




W. P. Aiken 


'01 


S. F. Hinkle 


14 


R. Tohnson 


'18 




R. A. McCona'gha 


'07 


W. L. Wishart 


14 


T. S. Grav 


'20 




J. S. Clcland 


'08 


H. C. Wallace 


14 


A. W. Gordon 


'20 




R. A. Pollock 


'09 


T. VV. Tenner 


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J. T. Vorhis 


'20 




1. K. Giflfen 


'10 


T. P. Sturgeon 


15 


G. H. . Melone 


'20 




W. H. Gogfey 


'10 


G. R. Tohnson 


16 


C. At. Tohnson 


'20 




E. R. Lewis 


'11 


S. I. Atchcson 


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R. N. Montgomery 


'21 




R. L. Martin 


■12 


E. R. Gilloglv 


16 


E. H. Jackson 


'21 




F. L. Harper 


'12 


H. A. Cunningham 


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W. B. Wilson 


'21 




F. D. Mvcrs 


'12 


\Y. A. McConagha 


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V. L. Baker 


'22 




1'. R. Murphy 


'12 


T. T. Mcllvaine 


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C. B. Graham 


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Masters of Industry 



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College Orator 



America is the workshop of the world — a workshop di- 
vided against itself. We are living in an age of great in- 
dustrial unrest — an unrest whose fearful consequences have 
only begun to be realized in America. Roger W. Babson, 
the great industrial prohphet, reecntly said, "We arc in 
a most critical period unless both employer and wage- 
earner come quickly to their senses we shall witness the 
greatest industrial and financial panic the country has ever 
experienced." But why this unrest, these muffled mutter- 
ings of discontent, this anxiety and fear for the future? 
We can best answer these questions by taking a panoramic 
view of our social conditions. 

In 1912 a Congressional investigation brought out the 
fact that one hundred and eighty men control over one 
fourth of the wealth of America. On the other hand, we 
find the poorest two-thirds of the people own but a petty 
five or six percent. Not only do a great proportion of our 
population live in abject poverty, but millions more are 
unable to maintain a decent standard of living. In 1917 
when the wages were hi>gh, eighty-three percent of Ameri- 
can families received an income of less than one thousand 
dollars — an income far below the level of minimum com- 
fort as fixed by government economists — less than one 
thousand dollars, an income from which sixteen and a half 
million families must eke out a imiserly living. Think of 
the suffering and misery that this poverty causes. Dr. Ed- 
ward T. Devine compares the misery of the inferno with the misery of New York. "Men 
and women," he says, "suffer there, if not so much as in hell, at least to the full limit 
of their human capacity." And he adds. "There are more kinds of misery in New York 
than Milton ever dreamed of in his blindness." The unequal distribution of wealth, the 
miserly income of the masses, poverty and suffering — these are some of the causes of 
our industrial unrest. Yet the primary cause of this industrial problem lies deeper than 
these social conditions. It lies in the industrial system — a system that is teaching the 
capitalist that there can be only one master in a house; and in the house of Industry 
occupied by labor and capital, the capitalist has determined to be the master. He 
squeezes his employees to the limit, and justifies himself by the conscience of business. 
To him, good business is paying wages not one cent in advance of what competition 
forces him to pay. To his calculating eye, the principles of business and the principles 
of humanity are as far apart as the Poles. To him the one is cold economics, the 
other but an expression of a philanthropic instinct. 

But not everywhere has the laborer become the victim. Here and there in indus- 
try we see that, through the weapon of the strik, the laboring class have forced unrea- 
sonable demands upon the capitalist, and indirectly upon you and me, the American 
consumers. The labor union is becoming more and more powerful and is using that 
power more and more despotically. During the war, labor even dictated to the govern- 
ment by threat of a nation wide strike. And, ladies and gentlemen, men in the Ho'g 
Island ship yards demanded twenty dollars a day for driving rivets. And they got it, 
while their equals, shall we say their betters, were receiving only one dollar a day for 
dying in France. 

In fact just where the power in the present day industry lies is uncertain. Wc seem 
to be living in an age of chaos and confusion. Between the capitalistic and the labor- 
ing classes there has developed an intense hate — a hate that is inevitable because both 
arc in the game for themselves. The chief concern of each is the acquisition of wealth. 
The spirit of get! get! get! seems to be the master af industry;aye, more than a master, 
the god upon whose altars both labor and capital are sacrificing their very souls; and 
for every favored five hundred that that god of greed smiles upon, ten thousand human 
beings fall by the wayside of misery and poverty. And so this mad, inhuman rush -goes 
on and on, and as the devils behind the factory wheels watch this spirit of selfish- 
ness, greed, and violence grind finer and finer, tiny laugh. Inhuman! Inhumanity! that 
is the disease,, the the fever from which industry is suffering, a disease that is bidding 
fair, far more than we realize, to consume this great world workshop. 

But the very seriousness of this disease is a challenge — a challenge to restore jus- 



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tice, to make right the wrong, to heal the wounds. But how? By prmitting the disease 
to run its course? By allowing the problem to solve itself? If that be our response 
to this challenge, it will not be long until in the words of a famous journalist, "the fact 
that confronts us will be world shortage, the dwindling of population, the decay of in- 
dustry, the twilight of civilization." No! if this disease is to be checked, industry must 
needsi have a new master — a humanizing master. But who is to be this master? 

The history of industry has been the history of the achievements of capital. It has 
always been the great dominating force — a force that has made fertile valleys out of 
deserts, great cities out of villages. It was the organization of capital that developed 
the factory system — a system that has made our standard of living possible. It is capi- 
tal that has made the difference between the great textile factories of today and the 
spinning wheel of yesterday. It is this great organized force that has built up big busi- 
ness, that has made modern industry possible. A hundred cities have built their sky- 
scrapers — monuments to organized capital. Society continues to reap the benefit of 
its organization. But shall we let the unrestrained power of the capitalist become the 
master of industry? Even if men were angels, such a system yould not work because 
of the inherent qualities of injustice in such a scheme — a scheme which gives to the 
capitalists power, power to do good, and power to do evil, and to the laborer only weak- 
ness. We must grant that capitalistic organizations have contributed to industry the 
beneficent elements of economic and efficient prdouction. This is a necessary step in 
the process of humanizing industry; but a truly humanized industry requires more, much 
more, than an autocratic, capitalistic organization can offer. 

There are many who insist that the achievements of the capitalist have been ex- 
aggerated. They maintain, with some reason, that it has not been the capitalist, but 
the bended back of labor that has borne the burden of industrial progress; and so they 
would make the power of organized labor the imaster of industry. As labor becomes 
organized, it becomes more intelligent, more able to take care of itself. The laborer 
begins to assert himself. He realizes that in spite of the accident of money he is as 
good as the capitalist across the way. No longer is he a mere number — a cog in the 
industrial machine, but an individual — a personality. He is a human being, and with 
Henley can say 

"I am the master of my fate, 
I am the captain of my soul." 

And as the power of the labor union, grows, just that much more do its demands upon 
the capitalist become effective. Whether we like it or not, we must admit that every 
advance in humanizing the conditions of the worker has been in response to the de- 
mands of organized labor. Shall we, then, in order that industry may be made human, 
permit labor ot dominate, until finally the unrestrained power of organized labor is the 
master of industry? But this, too, is a scheme which must fail because of its inherent 
qualities, of injustice — power to one, weakness to the other. No! although both classes 
have done much to humanize industry, if the future gives either unrestrained capital or 
unrestrained labor, the mastery of industry, the devils behind the factory wheels will 
laugh. 

It is evident, then, that a humanized industry must not only contain the humaniz- 
ing elements contributed by organized capital and organized labor, but must be founded 
upon a basis of equality. Then why not retain the economics benefits of organized cap- 
ital and the social benefits of organized labor, and create a balance of power, wtih the 
capitalist on the one side and the laborer on the other? On the one side, dollars and 
power, on the other side, human toil and power. In such a plan the spirit of compe- 
tition would become the master — a master that would eliminate the unrestrained powers 
of either by acting as a check upon both. And what then? Well, what would be the 
natural result of such a plan? Here are two great powers of equal strength — both selfish, 
both greedy, both desiring the whip hand, the spirit of competition goading them on. 
What can we expect under such an inhuman master but strife? — a strife that weakens, 
blasts, kills. No! even with its basis of equality, if the future gives the balance of 
power with competition and strife, the mastery of industry, once again the devils be- 
hind the factory wheels will laugh. 

True, if industry is to be wholly humanized, there must be equality, and thus a 
balance of power between capital and labor is necessary, but it is in itself insufficient. 
Power and coercion and force settle nothing. They drive men apart and make them 
mad with inhumanity. There must be something more than efficient, capitalistic pro- 
duction, something more than the recognition of personality in labor, something more 
than a mathematical formula for justice, something more than mere schemes and plans, 



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a something — an element that is so essential that without it all schemes and plans will 
fail; an element simple, yet sublime. Humanized Cooperation. A cooperation in which 
the capitalist and the laborer sit around a common table, not to see how much one must 
give the other, but to see how much each can give to humanity; when they cooperate, 
not because they have to, nor because they realize that cooperation instead of compe- 
tition is the best business policy, but because they want to, because they look at each 
other as equals, as brothers in a common society. A cooperation which involves the 
spirit of sacrifice and service, a spirit in which selfishness and greed give away to un- 
selfishness, in which the chief concern of mankind is not the acquisition of wealth but 
the creation of a better society. 

Masters of industry — Get! Get! Get! Domination of Capital, Organization of Labor 
— struggle, violence, strife — Inhumanity! These masters must go and in their place the 
future must usher in this new master of humanized cooperation. No man can deter- 
mine just how the industrial problem is to be solved; but this we know, industry cannot 
be humanized except as men learn to work together for the common good. And when 
that day has fully come capital will no longer be looked upon as a great unscrupulous 
monster ready to devour anything it can get its capitalistic hands upon, but as a great 
organized servant of society, serving with its money, its courage, its power. Labor 
will no longer be looked upon as merely an essential part of the industrial machinery, 
but as the other great servant, serving with its sweat and blood and brawn. A servant 
worthy of its hire. And as this new era dawns, the mutterings of discontent will be 
silenced, the clouds of unrest will roll away. For as the spirit of cooperation, of hu- 
manity — the spirit of Christ — becomes the master of industry, the devils behind the fac- 
tory wheels will laugh no longer. 



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The Weaver Contests 

Two of the Annual Contests in Muskingum are the Bible Reading Con- 
test and the Declamation Contest which are held in the second semester of 
each year. These contests were initiated when Mr. J. R. Weaver, of Canons- 
burg, Pennsylvania, endowed them and they have always held an important 
place among oratorical contests of every year. 

Last semester separate prizes were offered to the men and women in 
the Bible Reading Contest. The ability of the sompetitors was even higher 
than in preceding contests and the winners, Miss Rachel Loughridge and Mr. 
Thomas C. Pollock, deserve much credit because there were so many con- 
testants. 

In the Declamation Contest, Mary Reed succeeded, in her usual force- 
ful and attractive manner, in carrying off the honors. In this contest, too, 
the high standard of preceding contests was raised even higher than before. 



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Affirmative Debate Team 

The Affirmative team is composed of P. E. Hutchman '22, K. E. Miller 
'23 and C. B. Graham '23, speakers ; and W. D. Campbell and R. H. Rockwell, 
alternates. Three men, Miller, Graham and Campbell have been on the squad 
in previous years, while Hutchman and Rockwell are new men. 

Graham, captain, made Tau Kappa Alpha in 1921. 

This team met Baldwin - Wallace at home, winning a decision of two 
out of three votes, and Denison at Granville. 

Hutchman, first speaker for the affirmative team is a new man and has 
grasped the technic of debating and speaks with effectiveness. His logic is 
splendid and he is a quick thinker. 

Miller makes a good middle man effectively connecting the first and 
third speeches with his sound logic. 

Graham, the last speaker, is a composed, capable speaker and is known 
for his persuasive, logical presentation. Captain Graham makes a splendid 
last rebuttal speaker. 

The debate teams have brought much pardonable pride to their college 
this year. Our college can justly be proud of men, well trained and capable 
in the mental tests as well as those in other departments of college life. 



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Negative Debate Team 

The Negative Debate team is composed of V. L. Baker '22, D. H. 
Daugherty '23, and A. W. Wishart '22, speakers; and R. M. Giffen '23 and D. 
W. Cox '23, alternates. 

This team met Hiram at Hiram and Mt. Union at home, winning both 
debates. 

The debate season has been an unusually successful season, the teams 
winning three out of the four debates. 

Muskingum won this season, the championship of both triangles in which 
she was a member. In the Hiram - Muskingum - Baldwin - Wallace triangle, 
Muskingum won her championship by winning the decision in two debates. 
In the Mt. Union-Denison-Muskingum triangle, Muskingum won her 
championship by receiving the largest number of judges decisions. 

Baker, first speaker for this team, is a good first speaker because of his 
composure on the platform and is especially indispensable to the team on ac- 
count of his clear-cut analysis. 

Daugherty is known for his humorous presentation along with his 
splendid logic and is an effective rebuttal speaker. 

Wishart has a remarkable voice, is composed on the platform, a very 
quick thinker, good in analysis and makes a splendid final rebuttal speaker. 



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Forensic 


Record 














ORATORY 






Year 


Orator 


State 


Eastern Divi- Interstate 


Tristate 


Peace 








Contest 


sion Interstate Contest 


Contest 


Contest 


1908-09 


R. A. 


Pollock I 




? 


? 




1909-10 


Earl 
W. J. 


Lewis 
Giffen 


2 






1 




1910-11 


Earl Lewis 


1 




2 






1911-12 


Fred 
H.J. 


Myers 
Giffen 


3 






2 




1912-13 


A. B 


Cunningham 1 




1 


1 






Ralph Martin 








6? 




Fred Myers 










3 


1913-14 


Wall 


ice Collins ? 






? 






William Wishart 








? 


1914-15 


Hodge Eagl 


eson 2 












J. B. 


Sturgeon 






3 




1915-16 


G. R 


Johnson 6? 






2 




1916-17 


Richj 


ird Joh 


nson 5? 






3 




1917-18 


(No 


contest 


during the war) 








1918-19 


(No 


contest 


during the war) 








1919-20 


Gerald Melone 1 


1 


2 






1920-21 


Virgil Bakei 


2 






1 




1921-22 


J. c. 


Ballantyne 1 


















DEB ATI 


















Ranking in Ohio 


Year 






Won From 


Lost To 


Conference 














(Forme< 


i in 1916-17) 


1908-09 






Mt. Union 
















Ohio Nortliern 














Cedarville 










1909-10 






Mt. Union 
Hiram 




Geneva 






1910-11 






Otterbein 




Mt. Unron 


(Muskin 


gum won 








Hiram 






first place in the 


1911-12 






Geneva 




Mt. Union 


Hiram-Baldwin- 








Mt. Union 






Wallace 


-Muskingum 








Ohio University 




and Mt. 


Union-Deni- 


1912-13 






Geneva 




Heidelberg 


son-Mus 


kingum 








Wittenberg 




Otterbein 


triangles 











Mt. Union 










1913-14 






Geneva 
Mt. Union 
Ohio North 


ern 


Otterbein 
Heidelberg 






1914-15 






Otterbein (2debates) 














Mt. Union 
















Ohio North 


ern 








1915-16 






Otterbein 
Mt. Union 




Otterbein 






1916-17 






Otterbein 
Hiram 




Heidelberg 
Wittenberg 






1917-18 






Heidelberg 
Mt. Union 




Otterbein 
Hiram 




1 


1918-19 






Heidelberg 
Mt. Union 




Wooster 
Geneva 




1 


1919-20 






Hirain 
Otterbein 




HeideT&erg 
Geneva 
Bethany 
Mt. Union 




1 


1920-21 






Hiram 




Otterbein 












Hiram (2 debates) 






2 


1921-22 






Hiram 




Denison 




? 



Baldwin-Wallace 
Mt. Union 



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Mrs. Layton 

To Mrs. Layton we can give the su- 
preme professorial tribute — she makes 
us work and enjoy it. Here is the gift, 
far too rare, of lifting her associates 
above the commoness of life. When 
she teaches, we feel and see the higher 
joys of living — we know the pettiness 
of our behavior, and strive to reach the 
level on which she lives. 

Taking a course in Shakespeare or 
other drama, or interpretation under 
Mrs. Layton is more than the ordinary 
perusing of text books ; it is a real deep- 
ening of insight into Shakespeare, or 
drama, or other literature. 

Always ready to smile, willing to 
work with and for you as far as you 
can go, and then to lead you a bit farther, anxious to help where 
she can, Mrs. Layton is the ideal teacher. Her energy must 
often be taxed by her unselfish work for others, but her spirit 
never tells of any slackening of pace. 

Imagine a father's power, a mother's insight and patience, a 
sister's sympathy, and a brother's joy merged into a delightful 
woman, and you have Mrs. Layton. Knowing her and working 
with her is more delightful than merely learning; it is realizing 
the possibilities of life. 




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The Senior Play 

"As You Yike It", as staged by the class of 'Twenty-two on January 
twelfth, was one of the finest dramatic representations ever witnessed at Mus- 
kingum. The beautiful costumes, draperies and marvelous lighting effects, 
together with the dramatic skill displayed in the interpretation uf this Shakes- 
pearean comedy, combined to make the play as a whole one of surpassing 
beauty. 

CAST OF CHARACTERS 

Duke, living in banishment Daniel Hamilton 

Frederick, his brother and usurper of his dominions Ruth Moore 

Amiens 1 [Merle Bevington 

\ lords attending on banished duke \ 

Jacques] [Horace Giffen 

Le Beau, a courtier attending upon Frederick Helen Wright 

Charles, wrestler to Frederick Joseph Fitzwater 

Oliver 1 f Arthur Reed 

Jacques J- Sons of Sir Rowland de Boys \ Jemima Ford 

Orlando J [ Charles Hussey 

Adam, Servant to Oliver Velma Moss 

Touchstone, a clown Clarke Pollock 

Corin 1 [ Margaret Miller 

\ Shepherds \ 

SilviusJ [Arthur Mintier 

William, a country fellow in love with Audrey Helen Cleland 

Hymen, the god of marriage Elizabeh Winter 

Rosalind, daughter of the banished duke Virginia Gibbon 

Celia, daughter to Frederick Mary Reed 

Phebe, a shepherdess Bcrnice Boyd 

Audrey, a country wench Lena Pollock 

Lord and Forester Lulu Graham 

Page and Forester Thoburn Lcdnian 

Foresters Robert Moore and Ray Davis 




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Junior Play 

"The Admirable Crichton", by Sir James M. Barrie, was the 
play presented by the Class of 1922, during last Commencement 
Week. This play, which is English, is very different from any 
ever before stag'ed at Muskingum — the theme being "Circum- 
stances might alter cases — nature will decide." It has a very 
unique plot well-carried out by a star cast, which was well trained 
by two excellent coaches. 

CAST 

The Hon. Wooley Earl DuBois 

Crichton, the Perfect Butler Thomas Pollock 

Rev. Treherm Charles Hussey 

Lord Brocklehurst Willard Campbell 

Lord Toam Horace Giffen 

Lady Mary Virginia Gibbon 

Lady Catherine Ruth Moore 

Lady Agatha Bernice Boyd 

Lady Brocklehurst Velma Moss 

Miss Fisher Mary Reed 

Tweeny Helen M. Wright 

Servants, a housekeeper, a ship's officer. 



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"The Arrival of Kitty" 

The Philomathean Literary Society so much enjoyed the 
splendid presentation of "As You Like It" by the Senior class 
this year, that they selected as their society play "The Arrival 
of Kitty", a comedy, the plot of which is based on the former 
one. This is the first time for several years that the Philoma- 
thean's as a society have ventured into the realm of dramatics. 
Judging from enjoyment evidenced by the audience, this venture 
was decidedly successful. We hope that having once entered, 
they will find such productions attractive enough to return tu 
each year. 

CAST 

Ting, the Bell Boy __. Arthur Minticr 

Sam, the Porter Maxwell Boggs 

Bobbie Baxter, of Yale Ross Wilson 

William Winkler, Uncle of Jane Horace Giffen 

Benjamin Moore, of New York Merle Bevington 

Aunt Jane, Sister of Winkler Mary White 

Jane, Friend of Bobbie Ruth" Moore 

"Kitty" Benders, the Actress ___ Helen Cleland 

Suzette, the Maid Lydia Steele 




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Erodelphian Play 

The annual Erodelphian literary play departed from its 
usual form this year and presented three one act plays, "The 
Work House Ward"? "The Slave with Two Faces", and "Never- 
theless". These plays varied in their natures, ranging from the 
light and frivolous to the more dramatic. The members of the 
society were fortunate in securing the assistance of the U. L. 
society, thus adding to the interest of the presentation. 

It is hoped that from the production of these plays, a dra- 
matic club may be formed in order that interest in dramatics at 
Muskingum may be further augmented. 



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Book VII— Athletics 








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The Ohio Athletic Conference 

HE Ohio Athletic Conference, which was founded in 1902, is an as- 
sociation of the leading colleges and universities of Ohio which has 
for its object the establishment of uniform eligibility rules and the 
furtherance of the cause of amateur sports among college men. 

The regulations of the Conference have for their object the elimination 
of the undesirable features of intercollegiate athletics and are especially aimed 
at the professional player, the migratory player, and institutions which en- 
deavor to secure promising athletes by questionable means. The spirit of the 
Conference is that a man should choose his college for its intrinsic value as 
a college and that no influence should be brought to bear upon him because of 
his athletic ability. The Conference seeks to eliminate the scrambles which 
sometimes occur among instiutions for desirable high school athletes. It 
recognizes that these are demoralizing both to the athletes and the institu- 
tion concerned. A recent ruling forbids athletic directors and coaches to solicit 
high school athletes even though no financial inducements are offered. 

The fact that Muskingum was not a member of the Conference was for 
a long time a thorn in the flesh as far as the alumni have been concerned. 
They have watched with increasing dissatisfaction the gradual disappearance 
from our schedules of the leading colleges of the state and the substitution of 
smaller and little known institutions. With the growth and expansion of the 
college just the exact opposite should have happened but this result is the 
logical outcome of our remaining out of the Conference. It is not to be ex- 
pected that institutions which subscribe to the rigorous requirements of the 
Conference will care to maintain athletic relationships with those that do not. 
Neither is it to be expected that the sport writers of the daily newspapers will 
pay much attention to the games of the institutions that do not belong to the 
organization recognized as being composed of the leading colleges of the state. 
Students who witness the games on our fields may work up enthusiasm over 
victories over comparatively unknown and unimportant institutions but the 
distant alumnus finds little cause for enthusiasm and at the same time plenty 
of cause for becoming disgruntled at the meager reports doled out by the 
press. 

There is no doubt that the regulations of the Conference are highly 
beneficial to the institutions which are members of this body. They represent 
the experinece of twenty years. If these institutions had not found them bene- 
ficial they would long since have abolished them. Muskingum cannot hope 
to establish athletic relations with the right kind of institutions except as a 
member of the Conference. If there were no other reasons than this it would 
be a sufficient one for her entering the Conference. But in becoming a mem- 
ber of the Conference she subscribes to a set of regulations which have for 
their object all that is desirable and the elimination of all that is undesirable 
in intercollegiate athletics. Muskingum's application for membership into 
the Conference and her entrance upon her year of probation required of all 
entering institutions is regarded among the alumni as one of the greatest for- 
ward steps that has been taken in the history of Muskingum athletics. 

— Leroy Patton '05 Alumni Secretary. 



178 



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Muskingum "M n Men 



FOOTBALL 


4 BASKETBALL 


BASEBALL 


TENNIS 


Hussey 


Bell 


Brown 




Gordon 


Davis 


Moore 


Bell 




Gegler 


Shane 


Tohnston 


Pollock 




Hutchman 


Bell 


Young 


Kirk 




Doudna 


Hutson 


Keach 


Bovd 




Moore 


Wallace 


Hutson 


Shane 




McConnellee 


Ledman 


McCIenahan 


'Tutson 






Keach 




Graham 






Young 




Carman 






Ballantyne 




Wilson. K. 


M. 




McClenahan 










Furbie 










McConnell 










Weyer 










Ditmar 










Wilson, R. S 











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Leaders 




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McCUNE 



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Football Review 

Muskingum's football season was ushered in September 5th when forty 
candidates reported to Coach Henderson for action. This was Muskingum's 
first year with an early training camp and the experiment proved a success. 

After nearly three weeks of practice the varsity met Wilmington Col- 
lege, at home, and was greatly surprised when Wilmington went home with 
the bacon, resulting from a 32-0 victory. 

The varsity came back strong on the following Saturday and wiped out 
the stigma of the former defeat by handing Defiance College a 34-0 decision. 

The next game was played away from home with Kenyon College which 
ended in a 7-7 tie. Kenyon scored first but M. C. came back strong and rushed 
over a touchdown and kicked goal. 

Wittenburg followed, at Springfield, and turned in a 28-6 victory over 
M. C. Although Muskingum was on the short end of the score, the game was 
hard fought from start to finish. Wittenburg was a strong contender for 
Ohio Conference honors and Muskingum made a good showing. 

Two more victories came to us in the next two games, Rio Grande be- 
ing crushed 27-14 on our home gridiron while Dayton was decisively beaten 
at Cambridge by a score of 35-6. The Dayton game was played before a large 
crowd and Henderson's men gave a fine exhibition of football, on both offense 
and defense. 

The team then journeyed to Akron where they met Akron U. and were 
badly beaten 35-8. The first half ended in a scoreless tie. In the second half 
Muskingum was first to score, making two points on a safety. During the 
last five minutes of the third and the first ten minutes of the fourth quarter, 
M. C. went to pieces when Akron scored five touchdowns. Muskingum scored 
again with only a few minutes to play. 

Western territory was invaded the following Saturday when Musking- 
um played Earlham. The game was played during a snowstorm in a sea of 
mud and water. Muskingum brought home the bacon with a score of 9-7. 

A scoreless tie was the result of Muskingum's last game of the sea- 
son, with Baldwin-Wallace, on the home field. 

SUMMARY M.C. 

Wilmington 32 

Defiance 34 

Kenyon 7 7 

Wittenburg 28 6 

Rio Grande 14 27 

Dayton 6 35 

Akron 35 8 

Earlham 7 9 

Baldwin-Wallace 



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HENDERSON 

Coach Henderson 

This is Henderson's second year as head coach of athletics at Musking- 
um. He came to M. C. two years ago from Bristol High School, W. Va., 
where he had made an enviable record as a coach. His ability as a coach was 
soon recognized in Muskingum's athletics as during his first year at this 
school he produced winning combinations in all the three major sports. 

Henderson returned to M. C. this year determined to better his record 
of the previous year and his efforts have not been in vain. His football team 
was recognized as one of the best in the state of Ohio. Losing five letter men 
in basketball, Henderson soon whipped some green material into shape, and 
produced a basketball team of which he may be proud. From season indica- 
tions, he will have another strong baseball outfit on the diamond this year. 

Coach Henderson not only has proven his ability as an athletic coach 
but has shown that he has the best interests of the college at heart. It was 
thru his efforts that Muskingum had her first foot-ball training camp. He is 
liked by a'l players. Next year Henderson should have some wondeful teams 
representing Muskingum in her first year in the Ohio Confernc. 



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Ross Wilson 
Assistant Coach 
Ross had three years experience on 
Muskingum's varsity and his value as a 
player was recognized by being elected 
Captain for his second year of varsity 
competition. During the year of '19 he 
led M. C. through a successful season. 
During this last year he was kept from 
competition due to injuries received in 
football in former years. However, his 
ability was again recognized when the 
athletic committee choose him for assist- 
ant coach. He was a valuable aid to 
Coach Henderson in developing a 
cessful team. (88) 



suc- 





WILSON, Ass't. Coach 



Manager Kyle 



Phil was one of the most efficient man- 
agers that has ever workd for a foot- 
ball team. When any work was to be 
done, on or off the field, Phil was always 
on the job. He was the friend of all the 
players on the squad and always had a 
cheerful attitude, whether the team was 
winning or losing. Kyle is surely deserv- 
ing of the letter he has earned as mana- 
ger. (70) 



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Capt. Hussey, Tackle 
Weight 178 lbs. 
Hussey has played his last varsity 
game for the Black and Magenta. Dur- 
ing his last three years of varsity compe- 
tition, he crowned himself with honors 
time and again. Altho not a spectacular 
player, he was in the game with that 
fighting spirit which won for him the 
captaincy of the team. Never has M. C. 
had a more capable leader than Hussey. 
As long as there was anv fight left in any 
of his team mates, Hussey could get it 
out of them. (82) 



HUSSEY, Tackle 



Capt.-Elect Shane, Halfback 
Weight 165 lbs. 
Shane has one more year of varsity 
competition. In his three years at Mus- 
kingum, Bill has been in every varsity 
game and has only missed five quarters 
during that time. Bill is probably the 
most consistent player Muskingum has 
ever had. When a few yards are needed 
Bill is generally called upon to make 
them. On the defense he leaves very lit- 
tle to be desired. No matter where the 
play is, around end or a line buck, Bill is 
always in the game. Muskingum is for- 
tunate in having such a man as Shane to 
lead their first conference team. (109) 




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SHANE, Halfback 



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Ray Davis, Center 
Weight 180 lbs. 
With commencement comes the passing 
of Davis, one of Muskingum's star line- 
men, to her football hall of fame. Ray 
has been seen four years in a varsity uni- 
form, playing guard and tackle for two 
years, while his last two years found him 
at the pivot position. He can well be 
proud of his football career. On the de- 
fense he was a tower of strength, while 
on the offense his accurate passing sur- 
passed that of many of his opponents. 
Next season M. C. will have a hard time 
finding a man to fill his shoes. (93) 





DAVIS, Center 



Ledman, Guard 
Weight 165 lbs. 
Toby was one of the shining lights of 
the 1921 team. It was Toby's first and 
last year as a varsity player, as he is a 
member of the Senior class. He surprised 
everybody this last season by his work on 
both offense and defense. Altho the 
lightest man on the line, he could match 
sticks with the best when it came to play- 
ing guard or center. His specialty was 
blocking punts and picking fumbles. 
Toby often broke through the opponent's 
line and tackled his man before he was 
started. (89) 




LEDMAN, Guard 



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Farley Bell, Fullback 
Weight 195 lbs. 
Altho playing the fullback position Bell 
called the signals during the past season. 
He showed fine judgment in calling his 
plays, especially at critical points of the 
game. Thru his headwork M. C. gained 
many yards. "Bugs" was not only a ca- 
pable leader but was also a wonder when 
he took his turn to buck the line. We 
could usually count on a gain when he 
carried the ball. On defense he backed 
up the line and they seldom got past 
him. Before the sason ended Bell de- 
veloped into a grat punter, his punts 
averaging 50 yards. Next year he should 
make a good bid for all-conference full- 
back. (110) 



BELL, Fullback 



Wallace, Tackle 
Weight 180 lbs. 
In Wallace, Muskingum has one of the 
most promising players that has eve- 
donned a varsity unform. Wallace, altho 
only a Freshman, had no trouble ma 1 i;:g 
the varsity. On offense he played tackle 
and on defense guard. He could always 
be counted upon to open a hole in the 
line for the backfield and on the defense 
he was a tower of strength. It took an 
exceptional player to take Wallace out of 
the play. He also had a special liking 
for blocking punts. Wallace should de- 
velop into one of the greatest players M. 
C. has ever had. (100) 





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HuTson, End 
Weight 175 lbs. 
"Pud" finished his second year of var- 
sity football. This year's playing was 
much improved over that of the 1920 
season, which was not to be laughed at. 
"Pud" is one of the quiet fellows who 
never says much but who is judged by 
actions on the field. He was one of the 
hardest workers on the squad, and at 
end was a valuable man for Coach Hen- 
derson. When the opposing side started 
around Pud's end they usually found a 
strong barrier to contend with. Hutson 
has two more seasons of varsity competi- 
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Keach, End 
Weight 105 lbs. 
Johnny was one of the most valuable 
players on the team this past season. He 
was here, there, and everywhere. Oppos- 
ing teams on the offense found Johnny 
a hard man to turn in, while on the de- 
fense found him in most every play 
whether around end or thru the line. His 
chief asset was his ability to pull in the 
forward passes. Many yards were gain- 
ed for M. C. thru passes from Bell to 
Keach. Johnny could also play in the 
backfield and was frequently shifted to 
the halfback position. (89) 



KEACH, End 



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Furbie, Halfback 

Weight 165 lbs. 
Furbie, who came to Muskingum from 
West Virginia, made his first appearance 
on the varsity eleven in the third game 
of the season. It was not long until he 
won his spurs, first coming to light in the 
Wittenburg game. Throughout the re- 
mainder of the season Furbie played a 
regular halfback position, not missing a 
minute of play. He proved to be the 
hardest tackier on the team and could 
carry the ball either in open field or 
through the line. Muskingum will be 
glad to have him with her next season. 
(100) 



FURBIE, Halfback 



McClenahan, Quarterback 
Weight 145 lbs. 
After being eliminated from varsity 
competition a year ago, due to early sea- 
son injuries, Mac came back this last sea- 
son and won a place as a regular in the 
backfield. Altho the lightest man on the 
team his lack of weight was offset by his 
speed and his ability as a sidesteoner. His 
chief asset was his ability to carry the 
ball around ends and in running back 
punts. Mac has one more year of varsity 
competition and he, too, should prove to 
be a valuable man for next season. (89) 




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Weyer, Tackle 
Weight 205 lbs 
This was Jim's first year 



competition, coming to M. 



of varsity 
C. from West- 



ern Reserve where he also played foot- 
ball. He was the biggest man on the 
team and proved to be a valuable addi- 
tion to out line. Altho Jim was a big 
man his weight had little effect on his 
speed. He played best on the defense. 
It took a good, big, and fast man to take 
Weyer out of the -day. Jim has one more 
year at Muskinpum and we look for great 
things from his next season. (90; 





WEYER, Tackle 



Younc, Guard 
Weight 195 lbs. 
Young is a product of New Concord 
and Muskineum Academy. This was his 
first year to earn the coveted "M" in foot- 
ball. His height and weight made him a 
valuable man at the guard position. 
"Brigham" was not a flashy player but 
always worked for the best interests of 
the team as a whole. He is a Sopho- 
more in college and should develop into 
a great player during his next two years. 
Next season he should hold down one of 
the regular guard positions. (8o) 




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McConnell, Guard 
Weight 180 lbs. 

McConnll came to Muskingum last year from Moundsville Hi, W. Va., 
where he had played four years of high school football. His ability as a player 
was soon realized and he was put in many games either at the guard or tackle 
position. M. C. is fortunate in having Mac for three more years of varsity com- 
petition. Next year he should give all line men a hard chase for a regular 
berth. (81) 

THE SUBS 

Muskingum was fortunate in being blessed with a large number of very 
promising substitutes. Among those who stood out prominently were Jack 
Sells, Bob Wilson, Babe Bradley, Irwin and Ballenger. Sells, Wilson and 
Bradley played in most of the varsity games, missing their letter by only a few 
quarters. 

Sells, on end, was the best man on the squad in handling passes and his 
ability as a sidestepper was shown more than once in sensational runs. 

Bob Wilson, quarterback, was unfortunate in receiving- early season 
injuries, which kepi him from making his letter. In calling signals and di- 
recting plays Bob was always cool headed and could be counted upon to di- 
rect the team in the right way. Sells and Wilson pulled the Kenyon game 
out of the fire during the last minutes of play. 

Bradley, as guard and center proved to be one of our most promis- 
ing linemen for the future. Altho only a freshmen, he was often put in the 
game at critical stages, and worked like a veteran. Next season should find 
Babe filling Davis' shoes at the pivot position. 



[1921 



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SEASON REVIEW 
The prospects for another great basketball team were bright when the 
fall term opened in September. However we soon learned that five letter men 
from last year's team would not be in school. As there were a number of 
promising high school stars in our Freshman class we consoled ourselves with 
the hopes that some of them would rapidly develop into new varsity mate- 
rial. As the opening of the season approached news came that we were to 
enter the Ohio Conference and for the ensuing year Muskingum would be on 
probation, subject to the rules and regulations of that Conference, which elimi- 
nates all Freshmen from competition. 

With three letter men, Moore, Bell and Johnson as a nucleus, Coach Hen- 
derson soon rounded the remainder of his squad into working order. Moore 
as usual shot fouls and for the reason made an enviable record, caging 172 
fouls out of 245 attempts. Moore was also high scorer from the field caging 
49 field goals, followed closely by Bell who tossed 47 in from the field. 

The season opened, shortly before Christmas recess, with a decisive vic- 
tory over Kenyon, followed a few nights later by a hard fought victory over 
Wilmington in an extra period game. 

After the vacation period, M. C. went down to defeat in her next three 
games at the hands of Bethany, Cincinnati U and Dayton U. All were hard 
fought games. The team ended its first trip with a victory over Capital. 

On returning to their home floor the team added another victory by de- 
feating St. Ignatius in an exciting game. Mareitta came next and defeated M. 
C. in a slow game. 

During the Pittsburgh trip the team lost its stride, losing three out of 
four games, only to return home and add two more victories, over Dayton 
and Rio Grande. In the closing trip of the year M. C. met Hiram, Mt. Union 
and St. Ignatius and was defeated by all three in close and exciting games. 
The season closed with a well earned victory over Capital on our home floor. 
Altho from the standpoint of victories the season was not a great suc- 
cess, the spirit and fight shown by the team at all times was all that could be 
desired. The loss of Moore, by graduation, will be keenly felt. With six let- 
ter men and a number of promising Freshmen, M. C. should have a great team 
next season. 

Opponents Muskingum 

Kenyon 11 29 

Wilmington 22 23 

Bethany 24 19 

Dayton University 24 12 

Cincinnati University 38 29 

Capital University 21 26 

St. Ignatius 27 29 

Marietta 21 18 

University of Pittsburgh 45 22 

Duquesnc 29 20 

Pittsburgh Seminary 22 31 

Bethany 40 31 

Dayton University 22 29 

Rio Grande 11 42 

Mount Union 36 22 

Hiram 45 32 

St. Ignatius 22 21 

Capital 31 32 



[195] 



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BELL, Forward 



Bell, Forward, Captain 
"Bugs", although only a Sophomore, 
was elected captain at the start of the 
practice season. During his Freshman 
year he made the varsity, playing at 
guard and center. This year he was 
shifted to forward where he showed 
fine form. Bugs could also play center 
or guard and was frequently shifted 
to those places. He was not only a 
good leader but also played good 
basketball all season. He tossed in a 
total of 47 field goals for the season. 
M. C. is glad to have him with her for 
two more years. 



Campbell, Manager 
Much credit is due Manager Camp- 
bell for his untiring efforts for the suc- 
cess of the team. Dan arranged a good 
schedule, and was always working for 
the best interests of the team. He was 
not only an efficient business man but 
had also the good will of the players, 
which is an essential asset for any 
manager. 




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Moore, Guard 
Bob has played his last basketball 
game for M. C. During his four years 
in school he has starred every year on 
the varsity. For three years he played 
forward and shot fouls, amassing a 
wonderful total of points. He captain- 
ed the team last season. This season 
he was shifted to guard and even while 
playing guard scored 49 field goals. 
Bob was probably the best shot, either 
from the floor or from the foul line that 
Muskingum has ever had. He scored 
172 out of 245 tries from the foul line 
this season. We regret the passing of 
Bob, who was a star in every sense of 
the word. 





MOORE, Guard 



Johnson, Guard, Captain-Elect 
Johnson, picked to lead Muskingum's 
first conference floor quintet, is the log- 
ical man for the position. Before com- 
ing to college he was captain of his 
High School team and proved to be a 
capable leader. Playing guard on the 
tip-off Rex took the position of center 
on the offense. He was one of our best 
passers and helped in creating team 
work. He was always a dangerous 
shot, pulling several games out of the 
fire at critical points. Rex is well de- 
serving of his new position. 



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Keach, Guard 
Johnny won his second letter this 
year in earning his "M" in basketball, 
having also won a letter in football. His 
playing at guard was all that was to be 
expected. His motto was "Never say 
Die" and he surely lived up to it. When 
Johnny went in the game things were 
certain to liven up a bit. He was full 
of fi«iit from the start to the finish. On 
breaking up passes he was a whirlwind. 
We look for great things from him 
during his next two years in school. 



KEACH, Guard 



Hutson, Forward 
Hutson was unfortunate in receiving 
a broken hand early in the season 
which kept him out of the game for 
several weeks. "Pud" was one of the 
hardest workers on the squad, always 
fighting, whether the team was losing 
or winning. When his injuries recov- 
ered he came back into the game with 
all of his usual pep and won a place as 
a regular forward. He was especially 
dangerous on short shots. "Pul" could 
also be shifted to guard whenever he 
was needed in that position. 




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Young, Center 
This was "Brigham's" first year on 
the varsity. His height proved to be 
a great asset in his position as he was 
out-jumped by only one opposing cen- 
ter. By consistently getting the tip-off 
he started the team on an offense which 
often proved hard to stop. After the 
tip-off "Brigham" went back to station- 
ary guard. When the opposing team 
shot he could always be counted on to 
take the ball off the banking board and 
start the ball down the floor towards 
M. C.'s basket. M. C. is fortunate to 
have "Brigham" for two more years. 





YOUNG, Center 



McClenahan, Forward 
This was McClenahan's first year out 
for the varsity and he proved his abil- 
ity as a basketball player by winning 
the coveted "M". Mac played best 
when the team struck a big floor, be- 
cause of his speed. He was danger- 
ous on short shots and when Mac 
started cutting for the basket, some- 
thing generally happened. He has one 
more year in school and next year he 
should make a strong bid for one of the 
regular forward positions. 




McCLENAHAN, Forward 



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BASKETBALL SUBS 

Muskingum was fortunate in having a capable group of subs 
who, no doubt, had a great deal to do with the development of the 
team. In Brown and Chase, M. C. has two very promising for- 
wards. Both are fast and good floor men and both have an ac- 
curate eye for the basket. Irwin and Clark were the substitute 
guards and both did some fine work during the season. These 
men will all return next year and if they maintain their present 
pace, someone on the varsity will have to hustle to hold his place. 

Special mention should be made of Coach Henderson's 
Freshman outfit. They were out every night during the season, 
scrimmaging against the varsity, and at all times gave the varsity 
stiff opposition. In the class league they did not lose a game. 
During the season the coach developed some very promising ma- 
terial for Muskingum's future varsity. Bradley, who was prob- 
ably the best high school forward in W. Va. last year, gives 
promise of being a regular on next year's team. Montgomery, 
forward and Hastings, guard, are bound to make strong bids 
for regular positions on next season's varsity. 




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Brown, Captain, Left Field 
Brownie made a successful leader. 
His fighting spirit seemed instilled in 
his teammates. Beside his ability as a 
leader he proved himself very valuable 
as a player. He was fast in covering 
the ground and sure on "flies." His 
work at the plate was of the highest 
calibre. When a hit was most needed 
and Brownie was at the bat we were 
almost always sure of getting it. His 
services will be badly missed this -year. 



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BROWN, Left Field 



Graham, Captain-Elect, Right Field 
"Ab" after holding down the back- 
stop job for two years was changed to 
the outer garden this year in order to 
make room for Bell who proved to be 
a valuable man. It certainly was a 
wise move, for "Ab" showed himself 
to be a real outfielder as well as a 
catcher. He was a sure kill on "fly" 
balls and his work at the bat was an 
asset to the team. Besides his ability 
as a player, "Ab" had the ability of 
keeping the players on their toes at all 
times. This never-die spirit won for 
"Ab" the confidence of the team and 
resulted in his being shosen Captain. 
We are sure of a good year with Capt. 
"Ab" at the helm. 




GRAHAM, Right Field 



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BASEBALL REVIEW 

Muskingum turned in ten victories in seventeen games played for an 
average of 588 during the past season. The first two games were played at 
home, with Marshall and Dayton, Muskingum losing to Marshall 4-2 and win- 
ning from Dayton 7-5. The next game of the season was played with Quaker 
City, Muskingum winning by a 9-1 score. 

A week after the Dayton game the varsity took a trip through the East. 
The trip opened with Duquesne in Pittsburgh and M. C. went down in defeat 
8-1. The next day Muskingum was to have played Pitt., but the game had to 
be cancelled because of rain. Two days after the Duquesne game, Grove City 
defeated us 15-1. In the Thiel game the next day, the M. C. players found 
their batting eyes and handed Thiel an 18-7 beating. From Thiel the team 
traveled to St. Vincents where it was defeated 7-0. St. Vincent's pitcher had 
too much on the ball and held the Muskingum batters to six hits. W. & J. 
was met on the last day of the trip and was defeated 6-5 in a loosely played 
game. 

M. C. won her next two games, which were played on the home dia- 
mond. Blufton went down in defeat at the hands of Muskingum 6-4 and 
Capital in one of the best games of the year, was shut out while M. C. managed 
to get one run across the pan. Pitchers for both teams were in fine shape and 
hits were scattered. Muskingum's run proved to be sufficient to win the game. 

Capital was met again in the next game, this time on her home grounds. 
In a slugfest contest Capital turned the tables on M. C. and came out on the 
long end of a 11-10 score. Wilberforce and Dayton were played on the same 
trip and were both defeated, Wilberforce by a score of 7-3 and Dayton 12-3. 

The team returned home to play Marietta two games and won both. 
The first game was a walk away for M. C. and helped fatten the batting 
averages of the varsity. The final score was 18-1. The second game was 
much closer and ended in our favor 6-3. 

Commencement week found M. C. playing the Alumni, W. & J. and 
Duquesne. The Alumni were defeated 16-7, but W. & J. and Duquesne turned 
the tables on Muskingum by 6-5 and 9-4 scores respectively. 

At the close of the school year, M. C. lost five baseball men, three of 
whom were pitchers, Pollock, Carmen and Hoyt. The other two were Cap- 
tain Brown and Sid Boyd who led the team in batting. Coach Henderson will 
have a hard time finding men to fill their shoes for the coming season. 

SUMMARY 

Opponents Muskingum 

Marshall 4 2 

Dayton 5 7 

Quaker City 1 9 

Duquesne 8 1 

Grove City 15 1 

Thiel 7 18 

St. Vincent 7 

W. &J 5 6 

Capital 1 

Capital 11 10 

Wilberforce 3 7 

Dayton 3 12 

Marietta 1 18 

Marietta 3 6 

Alumni 7 16 

W. & J. 6 5 

Duquesne 9 4 

[204] 






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TENNIS 

Although tennis is still a minor sport at Muskingum, a great 
deal of interest has been aroused in this line in the past year or 
two. A great many of the students have become enthusiastic ten- 
nis players, and during the last few weeks of the school year the 
courts are full from early morning until late in the evening. 

The elimination contests, which are held in urder to find the 
best players in school, are watched with great interest, not only 
by those who are taking part in the contests, but by the student 
body as a whole. After the elimination contests are over the var- 
sity men are selected and a stiff schedule is begun. The sched- 
ule of last season's work is as follows: 



Otterbein 2 

Capital 2 

Otterbein 2 

Dayton 

Capital 1 



Muskingum 1 

Muskingum 1 

Muskingum 1 

Muskingum 3 

Muskingum 1 




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SENIORS 

Front Row — (Left to Right) — Finley, Campbell (Capt.), Brownlee, B. 

Wilson. 
Back Row — R. Wilson, Mintier. 



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JUNIORS 
(L-R) — Cosby, Daugherty, McClenahan (Capt.), McBane, 



Front Row — 
Moore. 
Back Row — Bell, Eby, Shane, Irwin 



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SOPHOMORES 

Front Row — (L-R) — Bickle, Brown, Louden. 
Back Row — Downing, Chase (Capt), Hutchison. 




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FRESHMEN— CHAMPIONS 

Front Row — (L-R) — Hastings, Moore, Montgomery (Capt), Bradley. 
Back Row — McCormick, McConnell, Wallace, Sommers*. 



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Muskingum "A" Association 

President Ruth Moore 

Secretary-Treasurer Elizabeth Winter 

Honorary Red "A's" 
Mrs. C. R. Layton Miss Edna Hosick 



Velma Moss 
Elizabeth Winter 
Ruth Moore 
Frances Barton 



Helen Wright 
Lydia Steele 
Frances Gray 
Harriet Hampton 
Mildred Reeder 



Red "A's" 

Agnes Morehead 
Hazel Miller 
Vera Malone 
Evelyn Goft 

White "A's" 
Mildred Galloway 
Edith Williams 
Elsie Moore 
Mary Douglas 
Helen Brown 



Ruth Deselm 
Dorothy Early 
Virginia Morrow 
Dora Martin 



Edith Smock 
Jane Bunn 
Olive Hutton 
Eleanor McBnrnev 



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SENIORS 

President John McBride Secretary 

Vice-President Paul Slater Treasurer 



_ Alice Law 
Edgar John 




President 

Vice-President 



JUNIORS 

Milton Boyd Secretary 

_ Dclmar Lemon Treasurer 



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Irma Gerald 



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SOPHOMORES 

President J. Mack Welch Secretary Eleanor Anderson 

Vice-President Walter Wilson Treasurer Herbert Downing 




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FRESHMEN 

President Jewett Montgomery Secretary Mabel Gibson 

Vice-President --Raymond Wilson Treasurer Gertrude Durr 



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The Muscadian 

With the growth of Muskingum College, Muskingum Academy found 
that her events and activities could not be given their usual place in the col- 
lege paper, the "Black and Magenta," so "The Muscadian" came to meet the 
need. 

"The Muscadian" is an all Academy paper from Editor in Chief on down 
and it records all Academy life. The college students are quite interested in 
the publication and "The Muscadian" has been a decided success. 

The staff for this year is : 

Editor-in-Chief Leslie Askren 

Faculty Advisor Miss Gertrude Martin 

Assistant Editor Evangeline Giffen 

Associate Editor Irene Morris 

Literary Editor Iris Gillogly 

Literary Reoprter Winifred Dew 

Social Editor Mary Dixon 

Social Reporter Alice Law 

Athleitc Editor Paul Reed 

Joke Reporter Elizabeth Watson 

Illustrator Jewett Montgomery 

Exchange Reporter Louisa Stone 

Alumni Reporter Vera Melone 

Business Manager Helen Daugherty 

Circulation Manager Milton Boyd 

Advertising Manager Eugene Martin 

Assistant Advertising Manager Martha Mustard 



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Academy Y. W. C. A. 

In past years the Academy Y. W. C. A. has been the nucleus 
of much of the strong Christian leadership in college circles. The 
Academy Y. W. C. A. is in almost every respect like the College 
Y. W. C. A. Indeed the enthusiasm and efficiency with which 
the work is carried on, shows real ability and concentration on 
the part of these interested Academy girls. 

In the belief that without purposeful ideals and noble dreams 
much that is precious in girlhood will be lost, the girls together 
search in all things for worth while standards and viewpoints 
which will make of them women upon whom responsibility will 
not fall in vain and to whom service cannot call without a will- 
ing answer. 



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Muskingum Hi-Y Club 

The National Young Men's Christian Association, which 
has recently extended its activity into the High Schools, has a 
real live branch in Muskingum Academy. The club is supported 
by the Academy boys and encouraged by the members of the 
College Association. 

The club is for the purpose of developing young men who 
shall be adequately prepared to be real leaders. It is intended 
as a center of mutual interest in all things which are of vital con- 
cern to boys. 

This year the club was under the guidance of wide awake 
boys whose regime has been a particularly helpful and successful 
one. Their officers are: Pres., Eugene Martin ; Vice Pres., Virgil 
Wallace ; Sec, Leslie Askren ; Treas., Edgar John. 



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Academy Basketball Team 

Under the supervision of Coach Cain the Academy succeeded 
in finishing their season in whirl wind fashion. The revised form 
of basketball which Coach Cain introduced seemed rather hard 
for the team to become accustomed to and they were defeated in 
their few games. 

To Coach Cain goes the credit of keeping up the spirit of the 
boys and it was thru his efforts that the team was held together 
for the final home games. 

Moore and Martin deserve a great deal of praise for their 
great defensive work. Mintier and Miller played the forward 
positions during most of the season. Both were good shots and 
pulled many games out of the fire by caging the sphere at critical 
moments. 

Capt. McBride, at center, played a great game throughout 
the season, his accurate passing and spectacular shooting were 
great assets to the team. Harrison, Giffen, Best, Fairchild and 
Baine formed the bcnchwarming squad and promise to make a 
strong bid for the varsity next season. 

Moore was elected captain of next season's varsity. "Fats" 
has played two years as regular guard for the Academy and with 
his experience and knowledge of the game the team should have 
a successful season. 



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March 16th — Wednesday — We assume our responsibilities and greet you all. 
March 17th — Thursday — Unusual formality this evening — Thompson, Davis 

and Bradshaw entertain. 
March 18th — Friday — "B and O" held true to its old reputation and brot Dr. 

Thompson a few hours late for our Founders' Day Chapel. 
March 19th — Saturday — Some of us attend the Sphinx banquet, some of us 

serve and some of us look on through the windows. 
March 20th— Sabbath— We all go to church. 
March 21st — Monday — 8 p. m. we meet for the first Muscoljuan staff meeting. 

Expect great things for we are the class of '23. 
March 22nd — Tuesday — Gypsies, Italians, Dutch folk, and Negroes add to 

the pleasure of Open Gym Night. 
March 23rd — Wednesday — Laurels for Muskingum. Our debate team de- 
feated Hiram. We are urged by Y. M. Secretary from Denison to help 
in the Near East Relief. 
March 24th — Thursday — Another speaker — Mr. Campbell in behalf of the 

Student Volunteer Band. Scientists hold a meeting in the evening. 
March 25th — Friday — Don't ask us why we "flunked" in classes today. Look 

at the next date and you will know vacation is here. 
April 5th — Tuesday — Back to work. Miriam White is wearing a diamond and 

Leander Finley looks especially happy. 
April 6th — Wednesday — We succumb to spring fever for the day. 
April 7th — Thursday — Another sign of spring — new and gay hats make their 

appearances. 
April 8th — Friday — We listen to long speech on African Inland Missions. 

George Crouch's and Lydia's birthday. 
April 9th — Saturday — The old Y. W. Cabinet is entertained in Cambridge at 

the homes of Helen Hoyle and Velma Moss. 
April 10th — Sabbath — We congratulate 
Prof. Bryant — Buddie and Jane have a 
babv sister Eunice. 
April 11th — Monday — Why are the profes- 
sors particularly painstaking on Mondays 
or why do we never know our lessons as 
well on Mondays — blue Mondav ! 
April 1th — Tuesday — J. Stitt Wilson gives 
his opening address in chapel on "Con- 
structive Christian Democracv." 
April 13th — Wednesday — Eleanor Cathcart 
receives very small package which she 
stowes away in the bank. 
April 14th — Thursday—We congratulate the 
Philos and Areteans on their production 
of "Madame Butterfly" and "A Man Who 

M, • j „ t^... U \\T1C~ » March 22 — Muskingum girls perform in 

arried a Dumb Wile. -Open Gym." 



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May 2 — Spring Normal students come 
from all directions. 



April 15th — Friday — In keeping with the 
day we celebrate our annual banquet with 
the Seniors. "Fish was the main theme, 
but it didn't arrive except in placecards 
and decorations. 
April 16th — Saturday — The morning after 
the night before. Some of us are on the 
decorating committee while some of us 
congratulate ourselves that the cleaning 
up falls to others. 
April 17th — Sabbath — "Deke" is growing up 
— he has a birthday — but we didn't notice 
much change. 

Mrs. Waller from Egypt and Miss Jam- 
ieson from India address the Sabbath 
School. 
April 18th — Monday — Another blue Monday with only a Muscoljuan meeting 

to break the monotony. 
April 19th — Tuesday — We look forward to flowers in May for it has showered 

all day. 
April 20th — Wednesday— The dogwood decorations form a beautiful back- 
ground for the installation of the new Y. W. officers. 
April 21st — Thursday — Interesting exhibition of old talent and discovery of 

new talent in Monstrous Magenta Minstrels. 
April 22nd — Friday — Rain ! Rain ! Rain ! Rex and Rodney and others starring 

on last night are busy receiving congratulations. 
April 23rd — Saturday — The seventeenth rainy Saturday — where can we buy 

web feet? 
April 24th — Sabbath — The Sun! It makes its appearance and draws strollers 

to the pike and country roads. 
April 25th — Monday — Our "Doc" is sick. This is what we heard today: 
"Does Fred Bell, a student, live here?" was a question asked Mrs. Bay. 
"Yes, Mr. Bell lives here, but I thought he was a night watchman," re- 
plied Mrs. Bay. 
April 26th — Tuesday — We draw long breathes to brace ourselves for an es- 
pecially big week. 
April 27th — Wednesday — Y. W. C. A. Topic "If." (If you only knew the ins 
and outs of writing a diary you would be lenient in your comments.) 

April 28 — Thursday — "Way down East" 
attracts many Muskingum students to 
Zanesville. 
April 29th — Friday — In spite of rain the 
baseball team plays and loses to Dayton 
by two points. 
April 30th — Saturday — As a matter of habit 

it rains, but it is nearly freezing. 
May 1st — Sabbath — Dr. Montgomery is still 
sick, so Dr. Kelscy preaches at chapel ser- 
vice. 
May 2nd — Monday — We are supposed to 
welcome the Spring Normal students to- 
day. They came by train, bus, wagon and 
foot. 




May 4 — Girls meet fellows after V. M. 



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May 9 "Abie" Southwick finds good 

fishing in front of the drug store. 



May 3rd — Tuesday — Dave Lewis saw red 
when giving his toast at the Junior-Fresh- 
man Banquet this evening. 
Duquesne, 7 ; M. C. 1. 
May 4th — Wednesday — Y. W. Girls line up 

for Y. M. men. 
May 5th — Thursday — Margaret Aikin reads 
"The Will" by Barrie to a crowded house. 
May 6th — Friday — Martha Taggart and her 
sister Mrs. Sarah Forbes give a violin and 
vocal recital. 
May 7th — Saturday — Weather man must 
have forgotten this is Saturday, for the sun 
is shining. Team lost to St. Vincent, 7-0. 
Old order passeth, bleachers burn down. 
May 8th — Sabbath — A beautiful day, decorations and beautiful service for 
Mothers' day. Miss Mary Jones, '07, spoke in the interest of her work in 
China. 
May 9th — Monday — Stag invitations begin. 
May 10th — Tuesday — Edythe Logan gives recital assisted by Ray Davis. 

Homer Sutherland celebrates spring weather by going swimming. 
May 11th — Wednesday — In keeping with the Eaglesmere program at Y. W., 
little aprons with big pockets were given out to hold the contributions 
towards next year's delegation. 
May 12th — Thursday — Deltas start the day with a breakfast in the woods. 

Helen Hoyle reads Booth Tarkington's "Mister Antonio." 
May 13th — Friday — We wonder at Prof. Layton's allowing the class to play 
"London Bridge is falling down" in Oratory Class. Too much mustard. 
May 14th — Saturday — F. A. D.'s have their breakfast out doors. We beat 
Capial by a score of 1-0. Hank's rebuttal speech in debate : "Well, gen- 
tlemen — -"the ship is sunk." 
May 15th — Sabbath — Attend to duties of the day — go to church in the morn- 
ing and enjoy the pleasure of walking the pike in the afternoon. 
May 16th — Monday — The basket ball men receive their sweaters and gold 
basket balls. Muscoljuan staff feels the spring in the air and turns meet- 
ing into a ball bame — we must have our fun. French play. 
May 17th — Tuesday — The faculty see themselves through the eyes of the stu- 
dents. Ay — there's the rub ! 
May 18th— Wednesday— The 1922 Muscol- 
juan staff presents their book to Mrs. J. 
Knox Montgomery. 

First day of Violin Festival. 
May 19th— Thursday— May day. 
May 20th— Friday — Overheard in Dean Cle- 
land's class: "Hawkshaw, did you get all 
the questions in that exam?" "Oh, I got 
all the questions ; it was the answers that 
bothered me." 
May 21st — Saturday — "From a Boy of Hu- 
mility to a Man of Humility" is given by 
Stanley Gray. 
Mav 22nd— Sabbath— U. P. College Quartet 
draws many people to Methodist Church. 




Sept. 14 — Muskingum takes on new life 
when Freshies arrive. 



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Oct. 4 — Freshmen win scrapday. 



May 23rd— Monday— We of the Muscoljuan 
staff meet for our last regular meeting this 
year, and then adjourn to Mary Allison's 
vocal recital. 
Mav 24th — Tuesday — We are famed for our 
Orators. Another recital, "The Rivals", 
read by Frances Martin. 
May 25th— Wednesday— We beat Bluffton, 
4-0. The Seniors have a party at Mar- 
tins. Roland Cleland gets thru the even- 
ing without any social errors. 
May 26th — Thursday — Senior Day — Begin- 
ning with Senior Chapel followed by Ivy 
Planting and ending with Senior ban- 
quet. 

May 27th — Friday — Seniors — we don't envy your caps and gowns on these 
hot days even if you can march out of Chapel first. 
May 28th — Saturday — Geologists go on an all day's trip. They didn't seem to 

mind the rain, but black clouds prevented the game with Wilberforce. 
May 29th — Sabbath — We all crowd into the R. P. Church to hear Prof. Cole- 
man. 
May 30th — Monday — Memorial Day. We the class of 1923 dedicate a new flag 
pole to the College. "Long may she wave." 
Auditorium is christened Brown Chapel. 
May 31st — Tuesday — Exams ! ! ! ! ! Biologists lose hope. 

June 1st — Wednesday — We discuss joining the Ohio and Tri-State Confer- 
ence. 
June 2nd — Thursday — Hot ! Exams ! 

June 3rd — Friday — The Academy presents the "Gold Bug." 
June 4th — Saturday — Even on Saturday we have exams. 
June 5th — Sabbath — Baccalaureate Service. 

June 6th — Monday — The great week is here at last — Old friends and students 
fill the college halls again, and upon seeing the Junior Play "Admirable 
Crichton" are convinced that each year is better than the last. 
June 7th — Tuesday — Choral Recital. A great success ! 
June 8th — Wednesday — Old friends meet around the festal board and enjoy 

a pleasant season of "don't you remember?" 
June 9th — Thursday — Seniors, what you are to be you almost are ! 
June 10th — Friday — Goodbye till next fall ! Some of us stay over to go to 




Eaglesmere. 
Sept. 13th — Tuesday- 



Here 



The "B and O" does 
bringing new and old s 
Sept. 14th — Wednesday- 
are back. Muskingum 



we are again 



rushing business 
tudents. 
-More old timers 

takes on new life 



Ort. 10 — "Shorty" 
head is pretty hard. 



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iii form of 285 Freshmen. We welcome 
them in large pep meeting. 
Sept. 15th — Thursday — Many lonesome peo- 
ple. "Bur." Wishart hardly knows how- 
to study for one entire evening. We 
strengthen the bonds of friendship by hav- 
ing a joint meeting with the Freshmen. 
Sept. 16th — Friday — The litcrarv Societies 



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Oct. 22 — Muscoljuan staff receives vote 
of thanks from Juniors. 



make a drive for new members. Stags 
open the social season with a weiner 
roast. 
Sept. 17— Saturday— The Y. W. Pink Tea is 
a success. We wonder why Helen Flesher, 
Georgia Gillogly, Elizabeth Stewart and 
Mary Allison look so happy ! 
Sept. 18th — Sabbath — Many new dates seen 
strolling by. First Chapel service — Fresh- 
men are introduced to "Doc's" monthly 
sermons. 
Sept. 19th — Monday — We meet for our first 

Muscoljuan meeting and start afresh. 
Sept. 20th — Tuesday — Helen Espy receives a letter from Fred. We can't get 

over the grandeur of the new cluster lights and the boulevard. 
Sept. 21st — Wednesday — We prayed for rain and it rained. Doc speaks a 

word to the wise in Chapel. 
Sept. 22 — Thursday — Calling day. Mrs. Morton speaks to girls in separate 

chapel. We become better acquainted with our new Dean. 
Sept. 23rd — Friday — Red and Bob have come to town ; 

To chase away each tear and frown. 
Sept. 24th — Saturday — Tractors and farm machinery make us believe we have 

an Agricultural school. 
Sept. 25th — Sabbath — Rain — but we need it. We train the Freshmen in the 

way they should go and set the example by going to church. 
Sept. 26th — Monday — Mr. Sprangle visits Muscoljuan and advises us to give 
Seniors prominent place. 

Let us take this opportunity to record in the annals of history the mar- 
riage of Grey Johnson and Treasure Tomlinson. 
Sept. 27 — Tuesday — We joyfully hear our little sister class arouse the town 

with songs and yells. 
Sept. 28 — Wednesday — We have our pictures taken with every organization 

that will claim us. 
Sept. 29th — Thursday — We have a party with our Uttle brothers and sisters — 

they are grand, good fellows. 
Sept. 30th — Friday — We pep it up for tomorrow's game in a 

"Doc" and many others make speeches. 
Oct. 1st — Saturday — We beat Defiance 34-0 and in the evening 
gathers for the term social. 

Oct. 2nd — Sabbath — Rally Day Services in 
the morning and monthly Chapel in the 
evening. 
Oct. 3rd — Monday — The usual gamble at 
the Lvceum Scat Sale. 

Miss Brown and Miss Sharp have re- 
ceived Master degrees from Columbia. 
Oct. 4th — Tuesday — We are proud of our 
sister class, for it wins two out of three 
events of Scrap Day. 
Oct. 5th — Wednesday — No longer are we 
able to tell our little brothers and sisters 
by their caps and buttons. The victors 
have discarded their badges. 



big meeting, 
all the school 




Oct. 31 — Everyone 
owe'en party. 



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Nov. 7 — Girls begin to raise money for 
Eaglesmere onference. 



Oct. 6th — Thursday — Faculty Reception is 
the means of introducing Freshmen to 
their first formal school event. 
Oct. 7th — Friday — En mass we go to Cam- 
bridge to aid in the celebration of "Old 
Home Week." The big event of the day 
is the pageant written by Miss Stone. 
Oct. 8th — Saturday — The Varsity ties with 
Kenyon 7-7 

We are entertained in the evening at 
oratorical recitals. 

Oct. 9th — Sabbath — Hark! What hear ye — Ned and Velma are engaged. 
Oct. 10th — Monday — Horace Giffen and Mrs. Tom Cochard return from Pitt. 
(P. S. Lil and Mr. Tom Cochard are very well !) 
Juniors-Seniors football game. 
Oct. 11th — Tuesday — The faculty women are now physical culturists and 

ardent devotees of the Herpischorean art (Hmm!) 
Oct| 12th — Wednesday — Our little sister class conducts the association 

meetings. We see Muskingum's future leaders in their attempts. 
Oct. 13th — Thursday — Bill Shane (Jr.) "Do you see any change in me?" 
Chase — "No, why?" 
The retort — "I just swallowed a cent." 
Oct. 14th — Friday — Areteans and Philos hold forth in a joint party in the 

barracks gym. 
Oct. 15th — Saturday — Many students go to Wittenberg to witness the game. 

In spite of their rooting we lost 28-14. 
Oct. 16th — Sabbath — We send the Freshmen to church and sleep in. 
Oct. 17th — Monday — Ohio conference accepts Muskiugum's entrance applica- 
tion. We go on a year's probation, starting after football season. 
Oct. 18th — Tuesday — A typical Freshman to Prof. C. E. White : 
"Can you ever take the greater from the less?" 

"Well, we have instances of it when the conceit is taken out of a Fresh- 
man." (The retort significant.) 
Oct. 19th — Wednesday — Wholesale buying to lessen boarding cost. In the 
future, when we eat will depend on our appetites, not on our pocketbooks. 
Oct. 20th — Thursday — Our kid "brudders" organize an orchestra of five mem- 
bers. 
Oct. 21st — Friday — Gladly do we welcome Georgia and Sid, Bob and Helene, 

but we let Helen welcome her husband. 
Oct. 22nd — Saturday — We (this time it means Muscoljuan staff) are going 
to entertain the students, faculty and 
townspeople with movies. Opening num- 
ber, "Humoresquc", tonight. 
Three cheers. The Varsity beat Rio 
Grande 28-14. 
October 23rd — Sabbath — Slept in last week. 
Conscience (collective) hurt us so we arise 
and go to church todav. 
October 24th— Monday— Prof. A. S. White 
to Chris, our Pittsburgh Jew: 
"Do you believe in a more elastic cur- 
rency, Kenneweg?" 



"No. It's elastic enough. Why not make 
it more adhesiv e?" 




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Nov. 9 — Albert Gregg stars in Armis- 
ice Day pageant. 



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Nov. 21 — "M" men become acquainted 
with the "ups and downs" of life. 



Oct. 25th — Tuesday — Johnny Ballantyne to 
represent Muskingum in Oratorical con- 
test. 
Oct. 26th — Wednesday — The new super- 
sedes the old as each class elects new 
officers. The presidents of the three up- 
per classes are: Senior, Robert Moore; 
Junior, John Ballantyne ; Sophomores, 
John Keach. 
Oct. 27th — Thursday — Seniois choose "As 
You Like It" for their class play. The 
Shades of the "Great William" are with us 
again. 

Oct. 28th — Friday — A pep meeting gives us something to do for tonight. 
Oct. 29th — Saturday — We cheer our team to victory as they plunge down the 
Cambridge field, beating Dayton 36 to 5. 

Shadyside is full of "spooks" tonight, for the faculty members and the 
Sphinx Club are having masquerade parties. 
Oct. 30th — Sabbath — Communion. 

The Dean has an understudy and is awarded the title of P. A. P. A. 
Oct. 31st — Monday — Freaks of all sorts assemble in the barracks for an M. M. 

Masquerade. 
Nov. 1st — Tuesday — Some forget that Hallowe'en is past. In this old world 

is isn't so funny what things are as where things are. 
Nov. 2nd — Wednesday — We appreciate more and more our new Dean. To- 
night she spoke to us on "The world expects much of the American girl." 
Nov. 3 rd — Thursday — If you judge the events of the week by the list of an- 
nouncements in chapel you would see how busy we are ; nevertheless we 
have time for a pep meeting tonight. 
Nov. 4th — Friday — F. A. D.'s entertain Delta's at afternoon party. 

Devotees have opportunity to see "East is West" at Zanesville. 
Nov. 5th — Saturday — Our old friend, Mr. Cox, contributes a realistic article to 
the "Black and Magenta" on "Bill." 
Muskingum 8, Akron 35. 
Nov. 6th — Sabbath — Need of prayer for Disarmament Conference is empha- 
sized in Chapel. 
Nov. 7th — Monday — The way to a man's heart and incidentally his pocket- 
book is to sell candy bars. The proceeds are to be used to finance girls 
trip to Eaglesmere. 
Nov. 8th — Tuesday — The Academy uses the old device of appealing to a man's 

pocketbook via his appetite in the form 
of an old-fashioned Cake Walk. Proceeds 
go to further equip the kitchen. 
Nov. 9th — Wednesday — Ex-service men re- 
call war experiences by Ex-service pa- 
geant, depicting soldier life in various 
phases. Judge Sadler lectures in the even- 
ing. 
Nov. 10th — Thursday — Freshmen remind us 
by short allegorical play that Better 
Speech Week is being observed. 
Nov. 11th — Friday — 12 a. m. President's 
proclamation for two minutes of prayer 



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Y. W. puts on "Japanese Art 



for disarmament conference is observed, 
followed by impressive Chapel service. 
Muskingum 9, Earlham 7. 
Nov. 12th — Saturday — We send telegram to 
Pres. Harding endorsing his act in regard 
to the Disarmament Conference. 
First snow fall of year. 
Nov. 13th — Sabbath — We awake to a white 
world. 

Nancy McCord and Louise Yolton in 
town. 
Nov. 14th — Monday — Ho Hum — Rainy and 

gloomy. Business as per usual. 
Nov. 15th — Tuesday — The general coffers 
are filled by generosity of R. L. Brownlee and J. M. Brown. 
Nov. 16th — Wednesday — Chuck Ditmar is playing the little sunbeam again; 
he says: "Isn't nature wonderful! She gives us all faces but we can pick 
out our own teeth !" 
Nov. 17th — Thursday — For a technical discussion of stock manipulation, Jim 
Root voices his opinion : "Well, now, if the farmer would only water his 
stock and keep it under his hat — " Rather sounds like Arabian Nights 
Agriculture, doesn't it? 
Nov. 18th — Friday — Some bet on the "Moo Cow Moos" or the "Alfalfa Delts" 

— The question is, "Which will eat free?" 
Nov. 19th — Saturday — Tied Baldwin-Wallace in 0-0 score. Mud three feet 

deep. Football season gone but not forgotten. 
Nov. 20th — Sabbath — The White household is elated. Mary Jane has spoken 
her first words. Here the incident is recorded: Upon seeing several girls 
pass wearing goloshes, she inquired : "Mamma, is that one of those boot- 
leggers that papa talks about?" 
Nov. 21st — Monday — "M" men organize and initiate new members. It's a 

hard seat that knows no pillow. 
Nov. 22nd — Tuesday — The Delta's achieve great social success in way of a 

banquet. 
Nov. 23rd — Wednesday — Vacation — Let us count our blessings one by one. 

The Calendar Eds. are glad they have a few days respite. 
Nov. 28th — Monday — Back to the mill ! Movie "Inside the Cup" is shown.' 
Nov. 29th — Tuesday — Miss Ruth Pollock's domain is enlarged by advent of 

worth while books and periodicals. A Dern Good Thing. 
Nov. 30th — Wednesday — Cast for "As You 
Like It" chosen. Virginia Gibbon to be 
charming heroine ; Charles Hussey makes 
Orlando. 
Dec. 1st — Thursday — Students honor grid- 
iron squad by furnishing, for the first time, 
a football banquet. 
Dec. 2nd — Friday — Stags ! It surely was a 
good Christmas party — by one who was 
there. 
Dec. 3rd — Saturday — The wittiest remarks 
of the season are compiled for the "Black 
and Magenta" to advertise Muscoljuan. 
Dec. 4th— Sabbath— What do we do this 
Sabbath? 




Dec. 17 — We're game, we'll try it again 
sometime. 



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Dec. 12 - 
Pittsburg to 
guess. 



Jan. 4 — Ilussey hurries to 
spend his vacation with — 



Dec. 5th — Monday — We are going to tell 

you of the latest memory book toast: 

Roses are red, Violets are blue ; 

Garlic is strong, I'm garlic for you. 
Dec. 6th — Tuesday — Opening of series of 

interclass games. 

Sophomoers vs. Academy. 

Freshmen vs. Seniors. 
Dec. 7th — Wednesday — Many M. C. girls 

improve (?) their looks by bobbing their 

hair. 

Dec. 7th — Wednesday — Buck (house mother 

of the barracks) "I don't allow any games 

of chance here." Keach replies: "This isn't 

that sort of a game. Don (McBane) there 

hasn't a chance. 

Dec. 8th — Thursday — Our old friend Margaret Stahl's in town. She read 

Drinkwater's "Abraham Lincoln" for the Lyceum number tonight. 
Dec. 9th — Friday — Louise: "I want to dance the worst way." Bill: "Naughty, 
naughty ; the chaperons might object." We overheard this at the U. P. 
party. 
Dec. 10th — Saturday — Many strollers tour the new '"dorm" and find modern 

conveniences such as chafing-dish kitchenettes on each floor. 
Dec. 11th — Sabbath — The next to last church date for couples "to be or not 

not be" before Christmas vacation. 
Dec. 12th — Monday — Prof. Lay ton (Rehearsing the Senior play) — "And after 
the ensemble, the ladies will pass out at the right and their escorts at the 
left." "Doc" (an interested spectator) "See here, young man, we're not 
producing "Ten Nights in a Bar Room !" 

13th — Tuesday — "Dad" Eliott makes many new friends among Mus- 
kingum students by his opening address. 

14th — Wednesday — "Dad" Eliott speaks to the girls in the afternoon and 
to the men in the evening. 
15th — Thursday — The experience of the last few days has left its mark 
upon the campus, and we find it a truer and better place. 
16th — Friday — Sopohomores declare their party the best ever 



Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 



a chance to do our Christmas shopping early — Y, W 



Dec. 17th — Saturday 



We have 
Japanese Art Sale. 



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anas 

0^ JAN-12 

ONE NIGHT ONLY. 

4LL STAR-CAST 



Jan. 12 — Tom Pollock prove 
real fool in "As You Like It." 



-Strong: winds from the West. Good night Mag pole. 

Dec. 18th— Sabbath --The beautiful old 
Christmas music was rendered very ably 
by the U. P. choir. 

Dec. 19th— Monday— "Black and Magenta" 
staff has a house warming. 

Dec. 26th — Tuesday — Pre-Christmas instru- 
mental and vocal program arranged by 
Conservatory. 

Dec. 21st — Wednesday — We are again rock- 
ed homeward in the bosom of the "B & O." 

|an. 4th — Wednesday— St. Nick was kind to 
all good students judging by the evidence 
of new togs, jewelry, etc. 

Jan. 5th — Thursday -Heard on the lake: — 





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Jan. 21 — "Gene" Pounds makes last 
great effort to get in all semester papers. 



Marg. Denison : "Drink to me only vith 
thine eyes." Besore : "Sorry, I lefl my 
glasses at home." 

Jan. 6th — Friday — The birth of a new idea 
is taking- place. The student council is 
advocated by many. 
Jan. 7th — Saturday — Thrilling game with 
Wilmington. Ended in a tie, but five min- 
utes extra gives M. C. the victory with 
score of 23-22. 
Jan. 8th — Sabbath — Presbyterian Church re- 
ceives our patronage today. Bill Shane 
contributes wooden nickel to the plate. 
Jan. 9th — Monday — Phil Kyle (after seeing 
Glen fall) "Well, sinners stand on slippery 
ground." Adams: "They sure do, but I 

don't see how they do it." Count your bruises one by one ! 
Jan. 10th — Tuesday — Frame church is disappearing so rapidly that soon it will 
be as if it never had been. Class games continue. Juniors are defeated by 
Sophomores. 
Jan. 11th — Wednesday — We learn in Y. W. the art of the date courteous. 
Jan. 12th — Thursday — Just before the Play began — Joe Fitz : "Will you please 
run up the curtain, Toby?" Toby: "I'll try, but I'm not in very good 
training, now." Congratulations on the excellent production, Seniors ! 
Jan. 13th — Friday — In spite of the evil omens of its being Friday, the thir- 
teenth, we came through the day alive. 
Jan. 14th — Saturday — Usual cleaning of rooms, hair washing, trips to Zanes- 

ville, and all that Saturday stuff. 
Jan. 15th — Sabbath — We listen to Methodist precepts this week. 
Jan. 16th — Monday — "Suds" presents his alibi — Here it is verbatim : "The rea- 
son I was late at the last game was because I left my white pants in the 
locker and someone hooked the key." Accepted. 
17th — Tuesday — Prof. Porter: "Miss Pollock, what is a vacuum?" 
Peg: "I can't explain it, but I have it in my head." 

18th — Wednesday — We've just had the best time down on the lake. The 
ice was better than ever this year, and that's no joke. 
Jan. 19th — Thursday — Choral Society, assisted by Lyric quartet from Pitts- 
burg, gives "Elijah." 
Jan. 20th — Friday — Literary Societies. 

Jan. 21st — Saturday — (Final rush to finish 
back papers and note-books to close sem- 
ester's work) The dark cloud of exam 
week is in the horizon. 
Jan. 22nd — Sabbath — It's the Reformed 

Church's turn this time. 
Jan. 23rd — Monday — Lake is like crystal 

and exams begin. 'Twas ever thus. 
Jan. 24th — Tuesday — Can we joke during 
exam week? Ursula — "What an awful 
gash you have on your forehead. Rocky!" 
Rocky — "Oh, next to nothing; next to 
nothing." 
(an. 25th — Wednesday — We take time to go 
start/- 23 - Manv skaters lear " to " cut to Y. M. and Y. W. 



Jan. 
Jan. 






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Jan. 30 — We all take advantage of the 
one-day vacation. 



Jan. 26th — Thursday — Faculty look worn, 
but students more so. Miss Rentsch's 
health fails. 
Jan. 7th — Friday — Exams in spite of the 

day. Varsity defeats St. Ignatius. 
Jan. 28th — Saturday — Ice begins to melt 

with last of exams. 
Jan. 29th — Sabbath — We have gone the 

rounds of churches. We sleep in. 
Jan. 30th — Monday — Our one mid-semester 
holiday is spent in recuperating after 
exams, and we have opportunity to see the 
"Sheik." 
Jan. 31st — Tuesday — Twenty some new students enroll at opening of new 

semester. 
Feb. 1st — Wednesday — "Doc" still reads from Proverbs and lectures us chil- 
dren for muddy feet. "What you are to be, you are now becoming." 
Feb. 2nd — Thursday — One of the most remarkable lecture course numbers of 

the year ; Adrian Newens reads "To Him That Hath." 
Feb. 3rd — Friday — Freshmen politicians get in the game. The new system 

of momentary conventions! is started by our yearlings. 
Feb. 4th — Saturday — We again feel that we can afford an entire evening de- 
voted to entertainment. Varsity plays Marietta ; game followed by Blue 
Book Follies. 
Feb. 5th — Sabbath — We've been the rounds. 

church to attend today. 
Feb. 6th — Monday — Margaret Denison entertains the magician, Mr. 
Why did Phil steal the candy? Eby and Helen think they know. 
Feb. 7th — Tuesday — McDonald Burch pleases audience with his program of 

magic. 
Feb. 8th — Wednesday — Aggie school opens short course for farmers. 
Feb. 9th — Thursday — Kitty has "arrived." F. A. D. Birthday Banquet was 

served by Sphinx pledges. 
Feb. 10th — Friday — Fort Smith entertains at charming Valentine Party. 
Feb. 11th — Saturday — Mary Ogilvie, Ed. Hutchman, Sid Boyd, Harry Cald- 
well, Walker Gordon, Elizabeth Finley, Dick Albright, Bill Weber, Harry 
Chalfant, Jim Davis, Wallace Taggart, visit their alma mater, almo puer 
et alma puella's. 
Feb. 12th — Sabbath — Many are at the Congress at Pittsburgh. 
Feb. 13th — Monday — Mary Liz: "Do you think veils attract the men?" 
Peg McKee: "Well, many a poor fish has be en caught in a net." 
Wooster stuff. 
Feb. 14th — Tuesday — Many bouquets in our 

midst, and the mails are heavy. 
Feb. 15th — Wednesday — John Smith re- 
ceives presidency of our sister class. Team 
gets send off. 
Feb. 16th — Thursday — English troupe enter- 
tains. We are intrigued by the English 
type of program. 
Feb. 17th — Friday — Our Junior class presi- 
dent, Ballantyne, wins highest honor in 
state oratorical contest. Aren't we proud 
of him ? 



We flip a coin to decide which 

Burch. 




BOOlT 
OLLXE? 



greatest of 
Reason's 
Oensations. 



\.- 



Feb. 4 — Hurrah ! Exams are over. 



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Feb. 18th — Saturday — "Commercialism breeds war," cried the orator, "I tell 
you friends, man comes b efore money!" "He may come before money," 
piped up a Hiramite, "but he goes after it." F. A.D. Club gives old time 
party. 

Feb. 19th — Sabbath — Gospel Team and Student Volunteer delegates out on 
trips. 

Feb. 20th— Monday— Bob Campbell in town yet. 

Feb. 21st — Tuesday — Men's Glee Club gives their home concert to an appre- 
ciate audience. Club pledges alarm landladies in the addition because of 
weird nature of their expeditions. 

Feb. 22nd — Wednesday — Crowds of students migrate to Zanesville to hear 
Fritz Leiber in "Macbeth." 

Feb. 23rd — Thursday — Fred Bell: "Deke is taking influenza." 

Bill Shane — "How much does he pay a lesson?" 
Feb. 24th — Friday — New Chapel monitors are appointed: Ross Wilson, Farley 

Bell, Rex Johnson, Norman Shane and Clyde Hutson stoically accept new 

duty. 

Feb. 25th — Saturday — Drug store has one cent sale of tooth brushes. 
Feb. 26th — Sabbath — "Doc" Montgomery leads opening service of annual re- 
■ vival meeting. 

Feb. 27th — Monday — Dr. McGeorge from Correapolis arrives and speaks at 

Chapel. 
Feb. 28th — Tuesday — "Doc" presents new campus plan showing present and 
proposed buildings. Indeed it looks like a university. 
Mar. 1st — Wednesday — Mrs. Arnetta Belle Lowery died at Columbus 
hospital. The funeral will be held Friday. Many friends mourn her 
death. 
Mar. 2nd — Thursday — One modern luxury has been added to Sunny 's elite 
restaurant equipment. A Jazz Box now graces the spot where once stood 
the old sideboard. 
Mar. 3rd — Friday — "Le Malade Imaginaire" is postponed on account of the 

malade non imaginaire (in "U. S.", the flu.) 
Mar. 4th — Saturday — "It snows, it snows," cries the school boy who swings a 
wicked snowball. 

Mar. 5th — Sabbath — Mr. McGeorge closes successful week of revival meetings. 

Mar. 6th — Monday — Fort Mustard beautifully entertains at a Saint Patrick's 
banquet. 

Mar. 7th — Tuesday — Dates are progressing as per usual. "Becky" is still up 
to her old tricks. Asked Furbee, "Do you believe in advertisment?" And 
Becky said "Well, 'eventually, why not now' has always appealed to me." 

Mar. 8th — Wednesday — Because of Biology lecture, debate, dates and other 
conflicting issues, Muscoljuan meeting was postponed. 

Mar. 9th — Thursday — Cox and Jim are still wearing out Sunny 's eats counter. 
"How's the world treating you?" asked Jim. 
"Very seldom," retorted Cox. 

Mar. 10th — Friday — Girls enter the athletic domain. School team beats Ag- 
gies by one point. Also U. L.'s defeat I'hilo's. 

Mar. 11th — Saturday — Nothing happened but the movies, so home and to bed. 



[2331 




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Mar. 12th — Sabbath — This is the last day we tell you about our church going. 
We visited all four today. 

Mar. 13th — Monday — De coppah moon was shinin', why say more. 

Mar. 14th — Tuesday — Cigarette Picture shown, also school 'fillum'. We see 
possible competitors against Mary Pickford and Doug ! 

Mar. 15th — Wednesday — The 1924 Calendar Editors buy notebook and pencil 
to begin their work, while we rejoice that our work is at an end. 



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Gentle Readers: 

Some of you, doubtless, have turned to 
this section in search of diaphragmatical ex- 
citation. Others have come perhaps with an 
esse boreandum feeling. May you find a 
super-abundance of that which you seek. 
We, that is, the editors of this department, 
realize that the offerings of our pages will 
. . likely cause to vibrate in some sage winds, 
I / the cords of disgust. But, the humor of 
s^psr^ JfH^ niost college annuals is often disgusting — is 
£^yky\lr it not so? 
Joe takes the grippe. 

College annual humor (phrase refers to a publication, not to a possible 
yearly day of jubilee and ungrouching) is based on personal jibes and sar- 
casms. For instance, we are said to have done well when we fill our section 
with such observations as "That speech of Dr. Kelsey's about the mountaineers 
in the South reminded us of John Reach's. " Now the obvious truth of this 
remark does not make it any less disgusting. But even Mr. Reach will testify 
that the joy of seeing his name in print, plucks the string from our statement, 
and that his free flowing well springs of disgust are checked by an immense 
wall of personal satisfaction. (We plead guilty to the charge of having made 
use of Homerian metaphor in our last sentence.) Having thus philosophized 
a bit, we now proceed to eclipse Mr. Twain, etc. 

We quote the following from the Literary Digest : 

Current Fiction 

"Excuse me." 

"I beg your pardon." 

"Be sure to come and see us." 

"We've never had a cross word since we've been married." 

"I'll pay you this tomorrow sure." 

"I'd rather have my Ford than your big car." 

"I'd trust my husband anywhere." 

"It's isn't the money; it's the principle of the thing." 



About Poetry 

Sometimes we feel that we have the soul of a poet within us. Sometimes 
when we are feasting our minds on the dainties of literature, wc are stirred by 
noble impulse to let our own pen speak. Now for example, just the other day 
we were reading a classic tome (this word 
tome is an expression borrowed from the 
French, and is equivalent to volume) and we 
found the little lyric : 

"Twinkle, Twinkle little bat 

How I wonder where you're at. 

Up above the world so high, 

Like a tea tray in the sky." 
We were moved and that right profoundly 
by those plaintive words — by their soul 
racking implication, so we decided to wrote 
some poetry ourselves. This is what we 
wrote : 




Dean Cleland cuts the corner 



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"There was a bright student from Ghent 

Who much time on his grammar had sphent. 

When the "prof" once was late, 

He wrote on his slate, 

'Dear teacher, I come but have whent.' ' 

And a second which in metre is like unto 
the first: 

"There was a young actress from Gaston 
Who was known to her friends as a fast one 
When some one asked the name 
Of her husband she said, 
'I've forgotten the name of the last one.' ' 




Lena Pollock hangs her head. 



And then true inspiration struck us, our 
very being heaved and groaned, and it seem- 
ed as if our very mind did creek under a 
battering attack of wave on wave of what we 

are accustomed to dub Idea. Well, briefly, to come to the point at once, that 
which we had just conceived was this: we would write a rapsodic bit of 
poetry in which the meaning, if there was any, would be profoundly implicit, 
just, like the New Republic, or Mrs. Browning's Sonnets. This, ladies and gen- 
tlemen, is what we wrote : 

"Three aces is not a bad hand; 

In America, united we stand; (Strophe) 

But just as you please, 

Mice surley like cheese, (Antistrophe) 

And the Japanese make pretty fans. 
The editor was so rude as to say there was no sense to this master-piece, 
but, ah, gentle reader, you know and I know that he spake thus only because 
he is not blessed with a true feeling of appreciation for life's best. 

P. S. Prof. McKinney suggested that the effect in poem 3 (three) III 
would be more gripping were line three (III 3) so construed as to read, "we 
cough and we sneeze," but in any case we are sure that nothing could destroy 
the intrinsic value of the stanza. 



Have you really read all this? Well here's one more, we've named it a 
fifteenth century ballad and if you will pardon a personal reference, as Dr. 
Kelsey says, we think it almost on a par with St. Patrick Spens. Here it is : 

"Chirp, chirp goes the blithsome bird in the blue above. 

Soothing song in succulently scattered from out the sky. 

Chirp, O, birdlet! (Climax-Emotional) 

Soothe, O song! (climax-Thought) 

Sine: Yo Ho! and bottle of rum. 




Bevington pulls another A. 



Some people are unable to appreciate good 
classic poetry. We feel very sorry for such 
people as they miss much in life. However, 
as it is our aim to please all and slight none, 
we shall insert a little prose fur the more 
practical. Perhaps we should slate here that 
the following is a classic prdouction and 
none save the super-intelligent need attempt 
to understand it. All others may turn to 




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The Atlantic Monthly or Transactions of 
The American Microscopical Society for 
their reading. Well, here is the prose mas- 
terpiece : 

LIFE'S LITTLE TRAGEDIES NO. 3689 
Prologue 

Now Tohnny liked to sit and think of Jean 
his lady friend, and sit and sit and dream, 
and sit and dream. 

Epilogue 

Now Johnny likes to — and think of Jean 
his lady friend, and — and, and — and dream, 
and — and dream. (Applause.) 




Shorty presses Helen's hand. 



"I must be off," the young man said. 
As he rose to go away. 
"That's no news," the maid replied, 
"I've known it many a day." 

We are glad to announce that the following periodicals have been added 
to the library subscription lists : 

Police Gazette, the 
Breezy Stories, the 
Whizz Bang, the 
Olive Plants, the 
This space reserved for bright remarks about the 18th Amendment. 







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Things we have to appreciate: 
Miss Stone's ancestors. 
Jack Lowery's wit. 

"Doc's" addresses to 250,000 high school students in Cleveland who are 
unable to chin themselves. 

"This is the greatest time in the history of the world." 
"Mary lane 's cute tricks. 




Cassio: "Dost thou hear, my honest 
friend ? 

Clown: "No, I hear not your honest friend, 
I hear you." 



Stauffer picks up his feet. 



New Courses to be Offered 

The following additions to the college cur- 
riculum are to be offered next term: 
1 Elementary Euchre--<S hours. 

A fundamental course treating with the 
primary phases of card playing, with par- 
ticular attention to the shuffle, the deal. 



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and the strategic use of the bower. Prac- 
tice will be an essential part of the work. 
Midaeval Penny Ante — 6 hours. Prere- 
quisite — -Course 1. 

A historical course treating on the origin 
and development of our great national 
game. 

Draw Poker Seminar — By permission. 
An advanced course for those majoring 
in the department. (It is advised that 
students majoring in this department 
elect a minor in Bible and vice-versa. 



Edith: Did you know that Peg Miller's 
Pitt fellow is a surgeon? 

Wilma : Really ? Who told you ? 

Edith : I heard Dot remark that he is an op 




y>H\ 



Deke : I don't like these photos a bit. I look like an ape. 

Cox: You should have thought of that before you had them taken. 




TABULA RASA — RECORD OF CLASS OF 1922 



So beautiful she seemed to me, 
I wished that we might wed, 
Her neck was just like ivory, 
But alas, so was her head ! 



INTELLIGENCE TEST 
For the general good of the school and for the good of the freshmen in 

particular, the Muscoljuan Staff has prepar- 
ed a few question which will serve as a test 
of the students' powers of receptivity and 
retentivity of impressions. Any freshman 
who can give the correct authors of all of the 
following quotations, will in all probability 
graduate "Magna Cum Laude." 

1 "Now this is a basic principle which you 
must get if you hope to pass this course." 

2 "The air in this room is a little close. 
Would you please open a window." 

3 "If you can answer this question I'll 
guarantee you will pass the course." 

4 "Fours quarter to the right, March ! Step, 
Step, Step." 




Ed. Clark raises the deuce. 



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5 "When I was a boy I lived out in Kansas. 

6 "Sh-h-h ! If you have to talk, please go 
out into the hall. You are disturbing 
people." h 

7 "What you are to be you are now be- 
coming." 

ETERNAL QUESTION NO. 76 
Do you love to live or live to love? 

Jane Bunn takes a bus to Zanesville 

ColTr^^Z^^ D ° rm - ah( ' Ut 10 - 30 P- —"Well Muskingum 




Peacock: What did you have in American Government yesterday 
Pop Stoup: Prof. White lectured to us • 

Peacock: What about? 
Pop: He didn't say. 



Pc r ;-¥»%: ary: D ,° you believe in the doctrine of total depravity 
Mick Cherry : Yes, when it is lived up to. 



COM ED V IN FOUR SCENES 

1 Dark street 

2 Banana Peel 

3 Fat man 

4 Virginia Reel 



classes S^ ""It ^i °" °- the heads ° f the members of the third 
class seems to be to keep the neckties from slipping off. 

Dave Gordon: I don't like this tooth paste at all. 
Bob: No wonder, you are using glue. 



Algebra 

n , )„ hat a l°t. of work for nothing, when, after two hours of concentration 
and figuring, x is found to equal 0. 

Friday, April 28— DnHunter gives an organ recital. Yes, in other words, 
'"^ a lecture on the heart. 




We quote the following from the Mus- 
kingum "Argus", July, 187] . 

"Tuition for the term — $5.00. 

"Boarding at reasonable rates can be ob- 
tained ,n the village. Those who prefer it. 
can furnish rooms, find their own provisions, 
and pay for their cooking f or about .fl'.OO per 
week. 



Keach casts his eyes at M 
dred Galloway. 



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a great deal is not necessarily an indication 
that she reflects a great deal." — Jade. 



College men are intelligent, 
Art Reed is a college man. 
But ■ 



P. Aiken — -"Why didn't that girl speak to 
you? Doesn't she know you?" 

R. Short — "That's just it. She knows me 
too well." 



"Forsan et haec alim memi- 

nisse invabit." 



"A brown silk tie to match my eyes," 
To the clerk the bright one said ; 
"We're out of those, but here we have 
Soft hats to match your head." ' 

— Adapted. 



We are always delighted to have our distinguished alumni visit us at 
chapel, and especially glad to have them speak to us of the days gone by when 
they were struggling young students. We feel that they must waste a great 
amount of precious time, (we presume that time is as precious to alumni as to 
students) — waste precious time in preparing the right thing to say. There- 
fore for the convenience of the present alumni, and of those of us who expect 
some day to be alumni (unless the profs, decree to the contrary), we have pre- 
pared the following outline for chapel speeches. 

I Introduction 

A — Remember how impatient young people are. 
B — Will only speak a few minutes. 

II Main speech 

A — Joy of being back to Muskingum. 

1 Glad to see old friends among faculty. 

2 World outside is cold and cruel in comparison to dear old M.C. 
B — Wonderful improvements since I was here. 

1 Paul and Johnson Halls only buildings then. 

2 Campus much more beautiful and convenient, now, thanks to 
Doc. (Whistle blows here.) 

III Conclusion — Moral. 

A — You young people have wonderful advantages. 

1 Equipment 

2 Splendid instructors. 
B — The bad wicked world needs such fine 

young people as leaders. 

C Take advantage of your opprtunities. 

(This section (III) may be dwelt upon at 
length until the freshmen are quite noisy, 
and even the juniors and seniors begin to 
show signs of uncontrollable hunger. Then 
it is time to stop.) 



What kind of plant is the Virginia creeper? 
It isn't a plant, it is a branch of the B. & O. 




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(2) 



MUSCOLJUAN 



"Y yt / E are unable to express our appreciation 
Y \ to the advertisers, without whose sup- 
port it would have been foolish to even 
attempt to publish a year book. As a friend in 
need is a friend indeed, we urge every reader of 
this book to bear them in mind when in need of 
supplies. We wish you continued success. 

The 1923 Muscoljuan Staff 






MUSCOLJUAN 



(3) 




/ 



^^TRANSPORTATION 



J 



MAIN PLANT 
GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY 

A Gateway to Progress 

There it stands — a simple forty-foot 
gateway but unlike any other in the en- 
tire world. Through it have come many 
of the engineering ideas that have made 
this an electrical America. 

The story of electrical development 
begins in the Research Laboratories. 
Here the ruling spirit is one of know- 
ledge — truth — rather than immediate 
practical results. In this manner are 
established new theories — tools for fu- 
ture use — which sooner or later find 
ready application. 

The great industries that cluster 
around Niagara Falls, the electrically 
driven battle ships, the trolley cars and 
electrified railways that carry millons, 
the household conveniences that have 
relieved women of drudgery, the labor- 
saving electricol tools of factories, all 
owe their existence, partly at least, to 
the co-ordinated efforts of the thousands 
who daily stream through this gateway. 



General Office COHHpSl BW 



AIR PURIFICATION 



LIGHT 



nit, 



Schenectady, 
N. Y. 

9S-486F 




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FARM ELECTRIFICATION 




HOME 
CONVENIEUCK 



(4) 



MUSCOLJUAN 



HEALTH SUGGESTIONS 

(Dr. LaRue) 

Good advice for the doctor : If you don't know what to do, suppose you 
don't. 

The doctor makes a good living in consequenceof other peoples mis- 
takes. 

The days of drugging people to death are past, and the sooner we 
realize this the better off we will be. 

It is not the mistakes we make that retard us, but our inability or un- 
willingness to learn what these mistakes teach us. 

Those who have not experienced the vitality and bounding health which 
comes from proper Osteopathic treatment, have not lived. 

Every mental faculty, every bit of ability, every function is marvelously 

strengthened, and the whole life efficiently 
multiplied materially by a treatment that 
works with nature instead of against her. 

Women without the beauty of health are 
as flowers without perfume. 

More things are accomplished by rational 
living than Horatio ever dreamed of in his 
philosophy. 

When you hear your neighbor speak dis- 
paragingly of Osteopathy just remember that 
mediocre minds usually condemn that which 
is beyond the reach of their understanding. 

Osteopathy properly understood is an excel- 
lent road to health. 

The conditions of good health are the pos- 
session of a receptive mind, self control and 
good cheer. 

The use of drugs, alcohol and tobacco, vic- 
ious diet, and sensuality have wrecked many 
a promising career. 

In the bright lexicon of Osteopathy there is 
no such word as rub. 

It is not strength but health that makes for 
efficiency. It isn't the biggest tree that bears 
the best fruit. 

He sins against his own life who ignores the Osteopath. 
Remember this: the health and efficiency of your friend was achieved 
with the same equipment that you yourself possess. 

The man who never changes his mind never does any thinking, and 
the man who does not think is drifting — always towards the rocks. 
Headache tablets are harmless — if you don't swallow them. 
To live as we should is the moral part, to know how to live is the 
intellectual part. 

Happiness comes through health. Efficiency comes through health. 
Health comes through Osteopathy. If you are doubtful, try it. 
Osteopathy is a virtue that is frequently overlooked. 
You've Got It! Now Keep It! Dog-Gon-It! Don't Loose It! 

GOOD HEALTH GOOD HEALTH GOOD HEALTH! 




DR. BYRON LaRUE 
Zanesville, O. 









MU SCOLJU AN (5) 



D M I STO N S 

Zanesville, Ohio 



BOOKS, STATIONERY AND ART. ALWAYS WHAT YOU WANT 

WHEN YOU WANT IT. 

Visit our Store and don't fail to see our Gift Department, where you will find 
Dainty Gift-Giving Articles in Exclusive Designs. 



EDMISTONS 



DUFFS CASH GROCERY 

THE HOME OF 
A SQUARE DEAL 

In Confectionery and Groceries of All Kinds. 
We Keep a Good Line of Cakes. 



f •* 



> 



JBttl) Hft (EnmpltHtpnta 
of 

W$t palace 3nn 

S. ©. Sunnafrank 

JJrnjjrietnr 



%^ J} 



(6) MU SCOLJU AN 



f 



We point with pride to 

The Woman's Dormitory 

Muskingum College 

New Concord 
Ohio 

as one of our latest achievements in 

High Grade Mill Work 

THE SHERDMAN 
SASH, DOOR AND LUMBER CO. 

Zanesville, Ohio 



t 



MU SCOLJU AN 



(7) 




The Way to a Good Appearance at a Reasonable 

Price. 

Watson's Good Clothes 

For Men and Boys. 



C. O. WATSON 



CAMBRIDGE 



ZANESVILLE 



Brenan s Drug Store 

Cor. 9th St. 
and Wheeling Ave. 

CAMBRIDGE, OHIO. 




Furnas (Columbus) Ice Cream 
at Our Fountain 

"You Are Safe at Brenan's" 



Herff-JonesCompany 

Manufacturing 
Jewelers and Engravers 



INDIANAPOLIS 




Designers and Manufacturers 

of 

CLASS, COLLEGE AND 

SOCIETY JEWELRY 



(8) 



MUSCOLJUAN 



Insist on Hemmers Quality Ice Cream 



66 



Always the Best 



55 



Manufactured in the Largest, Best Equipped and Most Sanitary Factory in 

Southeastern Ohio. 

We would be pleased to have the Muskingum College Students visit our factory 

at their own convenience. 



THE HOME OF GOOD SHOES 



9ft 



WMiM 



OPPOSITE W. NATIONAL BANK 




ZANESVILLE, OHIO 



^ 



=1 



! The Clossman Hardware Co. Idea" 



$=$$•$0$$$$ 



OO DO the right thing at the right time in the right 
way; to do some things better than they were ever 

done before; to aim to eliminate errors; to know both sides 
of the question; to be courteous; to be an example; to 
work for love of the work; to anticipate requirements; to 
develop resources; to recognize no impediments; to mas- 
ter circumstances; to act from reason rather than rule; to 
be satisfied with nothing short of perfection. 

Exclusive Agency for Thomas E. Wilson Quality 
Sporting Goods. 

=$sssizie$€$ 

THE CLOSSMAN HARDWARE CO. 

ZANESVILLE, OHIO 



MUSCOLJUAN 



(9) 



1922 

JVccept our greetings, gooh foteubs, auo our message 

^ealtlf anfr Success 
dmnfr 3Ktll anfr dmifr (Elreer 




Zanesntlle 
3J. <&- Coelbo, <J%r. 



^efoark 
31- Jif. puster, .JHgr. 



The Best Place to Shop 
in Zanesville 



is at 



Weber's Home Store 



Main Street 
Next to Court House 



Old ones will s&g again 
better have new ones 



Mr Swell Dresser. 



HayeYour 

Clothes 

Made to 

Order 



KARL STURZ, The Tailor 

Zanesville, Ohio. 




I IBERTV 

J^^l Mammoth Pipe Organ ^L 

Service and Courtesy 
Always 

The Best in Photo Plays 

Zanesville, Ohio 

T YPEWRITER S 



R 



ENTED 
EPAIRED 
E BUILT 



Ribbons Carbon Papers 

Zanesville Typewriter Exchange 

512 Market St., Zanesville, Ohio 



(10) 



MUSCOLJUAN 




MUSCOLJUAN 



(ID 



JJ. .;.*••-•• .«..•»! 



••••••••••••»•"••••»•••••••••••• 



..«..•..•..•..•..•.. 



■••» 




HE COLLEGE YEAR of 1921-2? has 
reached its close. Commencement time 
is a joyous occasion, especially to those 
who have worked and earned the right to 
receive a diploma from Old Muskingum, 
but, on the other hand, it is rather a 
sorrowful occasion, because the pleasure of personal 
contact and business dealings with the Senior Class of 
'22 is taken from us. 

It is a source of pleasure to us to have the privilege 
of coming in contact and dealing with Muskingum 
students, and it is with regret, therefore, that Com- 
mencement time takes away a great many good 
friends from our midst. 

Needless to say we very much appreciate the pat- 
ronage tendered us by the student body during the 
past year, and to those of you who expect to be in 
college again next year let us say that it is our aim to 
carry at all times an assortment of merchandise which 
is in keeping with your demands, and if our fair 
treatment, quality and service merits your continued 
patronage, we feel confident that our efforts of the 
past ten years have nor been in vain. 



TRACE'S 

Grocery and Meat Market 

Phones 4 and 12 

NEW CONCORD, OHIO 



«•••••••-- 



•••••••••••••• 



••» 



(12) 



MUSCOLJUAN 



The 



Enterprise Print Shop 

Is at Muskingum's Door with the Best 
of Service in Printing 

[JTllEW additions to our type and other equip- 
|mJ| ment modernize our plant and facilitate 
promptness and neatness in the production of your 
work. We put into our work more than is charged 
for, and your liberal patronage the past year is an 
expression of the service we have given. 

The Enterprise Company 



LANE 

Theological Seminary 

CINCINNATI, OHIO 



Modern Theological Curriculum. 
Two Courses. Electives leading to 
degree of B. D. 

Affiliation with the University of 
Cincinnati for graduate work and 
degrees. 

Cosmopolitan student body drawn 
trom eleven States and eight differ- 
ent denominations. 

Every form of Christian and phil- 
anthropic work may be studied at 
first hand in the vicinity. 

Preaching under the supervision 
of the faculty not to interfere with 
class work. 



A ddress 
President Wm. McKibbin, D.D., LL. D. 



Students and their Friends are invited 

to visit our plant and see a Real 

Bakery in operation. 




The Baker Bread Co. 



Zanesville. Ohio 



Red Star Restaurant 
-*- 

MEALS. LUNCH, ICE CREAM 
SOFT DRINKS 

No. 9 East Main St., NewConcord, O. 
H. C. BAXTER 



MUSCOLJUAN 



(13) 



VODREY 

Sport and Toy Shop 




512 Main St. 
ZANESVILLE, OHIO 



THE ROEKEL CO. 



Plumbers' 
Supplies 



ZANESVILLE, OHIO 



"College Men Are Wearing This Now" 



That's about the best recommendation you can 
give a new style these days. It shows that college 
men are recognized everywhere as style leaders. 

College men know how to appreciate good 
clothes all right — want the best they can get. 
That's why so many come here for 

Hart, Schaff ner & Marx, Stein Bloch, and 
Fashion Park Clothes— the Big Three in 
the Clothing World. 



THE A. E. STARR CO. 



ZANESVILLE, OHIO 



(14) MUSCOLJUAN 




The Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary 

HE Seminary is located at the center of 
the United Presbyterian Church. Its 
purpose is to prepare students for ef- 
fective work in the ministry, and its whole 
policy is shaped to this end. Instruction is 
offered in the main departments of Theology, 
and in all allied fields of study. It has six full 
time professors and additional instructors and 
lecturers. Dormitory accommodations and 
tuition are free. Boarding may be secured in 
the Seminary dining room, where meals are 
served at cost. In addition to Church and 
Seminary aid and eight scholarships, there are 
opportunities for self-help in the form of re- 
munerative religious work and other employ- 
ments. The library is amply sufficient for all 
lines of theological and missionary reading 
and research. University privileges are near 
at hand. A gymnasium provides physical 
exercise. The next session begins on Wednes- 
day, September 20, 1922. 

For catalogue or special information 
address the office 

JOHN McNAUGHER, President of Faculty 



MUSCOLJUAN 



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(16) 



MUSCOLJUAN 



We Are Here to 
Serve You 

Muskingum 

College 

Cabin 



Ethel Duff 



Claire McKelvey 



GOOD CLOTHES 

and 

Correct Furnishings of the 
Better Class 

22 Years of Honest Value 

Giving 

"Truth Only" 

"Facts Always" 

Courteous Service 




The Dependable Store 

FRED RAYMOND & CO. 

CAMBRIDGE, OHIO 



Cambridge 
American Cafeteria 

Under New Management 

STRICTLY AMERICAN 

Our Motto: "Good Eats, Cleanliness and Service" 
Moderate Prices Always 

READ THE JEFFERSONIAN 

THE 
CAMBRIDGE DAILY 



Southeastern Ohio's Great Home Paper 



MUSCOLJUAN 



(17) 



-Q 



A Service Store 

For Muskingum Students 

This is our aim: Our endeavor is to make this store 
attractive to you as headquarters while you are here. 

Ten complete departments embracing items that 
are in every day use at your disposal. 

We are also always glad to get you any special 
item that you may desire. 

A grocery department with complete line of high 
grade staple and fancy groceries and candies. 

A meat department for dried and cured meats- 

A furniture department — everything for furnishing 
the home. 

A book department will have all your college needs. 

A jewelry department — some new snappy college 
jewelry. 

A dry goods department — complete line piece 
goods, notions. 

A gents' furnishings department — the best adver- 
tised lines of furnishings. 

A shoe department — dress and every day shoes 
and rubbers. 

An athletic department — Spalding and Wright & 
Ditson goods. 

A music department for everything in music and 
instruments. 

Come in any time, feel at home. 



Enterprise Co - Operative Co. 



New Concord, Ohio 



(18) 



MUSCOLJUAN 



Kodaks 

Photo Supplies 

Developing and Printing 

Art Pictures 

Frames 




McDONALD'S ART SHOP 

New Concord, O. 



The 

Bloomer Candy Co. 



STAR MILK 
CHOCOLATES 



Zancsvillc 



Ohio 



THE WOMEN'S DORMITORY 
at Muskingum was designed 
and furnished by 

Joseph Home Co., Pittsburgh 



The services of the experienced artists of the 
Department of Interior Decoration of this 
store are at your service to aid with home 
furnishing problems anywhere. 



ESTIMATES CHEERFULLY FURNISHED 



MU SCOLJU AN (19) 



The First National Bank 

New Concord, Ohio 



Capital Stock $25,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 
$15,000.00 



L. J. Graham, President W. J. Grimes, Vice President 

E. A. Montgomery, Cashier 



We Appreciate Your Business 

JOHNSON'S 



The Three Ruling Factors That Interest You Most: 

STYLE QUALITY 

PRICE 

Whatever you purchase must meet with certain re- 
quirements, and always one, two or three of these 
features are necessary. 

You'll find (and probably know now) that mer- 
chandise from Johnson's is First in Style, Un- 
equalled in Quality, and Lower in Price. 

Let Us Show You When in Need of Dry Goods, Fancy Notions or 
Ladies' Ready to Wear Garments. 



(20) 



MUSCOLJUAN 




MUSCOLJUAN 



(21) 




o 
o 
X 
u 
w 



13 
oo 

W 

o 

w 
,-1 

o 
o 



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(22) MU SCOLJUAN 



=XENIA=— 

Theological Seminary 

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIW 

In its new location Xenia Seminary offers en- 
larged opportunities to young men who are prepar- 
ing for the ministry. Strong courses are provided, 
covering the whole field of theological inquiry. 

A study of missions, particularly United Presby- 
terian Missions in all fields at home and abroad, is a 
prominent part of the work each year. 

Financial provisions and opportunities for self 
help are such that no earnest student need hesitate 
to enter Xenia Seminary. 

The 129th annual session will open Wednesday, 
September 20, 1922. 

For catalogue and information address 

The President, 

6834 Washington Ave. 

St. Louis, Mo. 



MUSCOLJUAN 



(23) 



The Equitable 

Life Insurance Co. 

of U. S. 

Issues ull forms of Life Insurance and 
Annuities, including: 

A Life Policy. 
A Group Policy. 
A Corporate Policy. 
A Convertable Policy. 
An Income Bond. 
An Endowment Annuity Policy. 
An Educational Policy. 
A Policy to Pay Inheritance 
Taxes. 

Information regarding any of these 
forms will be sent on request. 

Represented by 

S. D. COX, New Concord, Ohio 



JOHN L NOBLE 



Lumber, Sash, Doors, Millwork 

Roofing, Slate, Building 

Block. 



New Concord, Ohio 

T. F. GAULT 

> &XOjll Store 



The 

DRUGS 

Stationery, Toilet Articles 

New Concord 



We suggest light fall suits for skaters. 



Ken Miller complains that a mouse crawled into his laundry 
and died. Well, we don't see how we can blame the mouse. 



Hank Caldwell — "This high wind causes my eyes to act like 
birds." 

Rodney Shaw — "Birds?" 

Hank — "Yes they flit about from limb to limb." 



O'Tempora — "Is the lot of woman harder than it used to be?" 
O'Mores — "I don't know but a lot of the women are." 



(24) MU SCOLJUAN 



The 



H. H. Sturtevant Co. 



Zanesville's 
Greatest Store 



Leaders 

IN STYLE 

IN QUALITY 

IN PRICE 



MUSCOLJUAN 



(25) 




(26) 



MUSCOLJUAN 



Si 



31 C 



66 




m? M@®ir@ CkA 



w 



Everything New in Suits and Furnishings. 

The new novelties are our specialty for the young 
man who wants to look different. 



MOORE CLOTHING COMPANY 

306 Main St., ZANESVILLE, OHIO 



3 C 



11 




MUSCOLJU AN 



(27) 



J&Gauihaii <D> uhUiemiraCo. 




Muscoljuan 
Printers and Binders 

Cambridge, Ohio 



ifi 



BOOKS, CATALOGS, STATIONERY, 
PERIODICALS 

GENERAL COMMERCIAL PRINTING 

BLANK BOOKS 

SPECIAL RULING 

LOOSE LEAF FORMS AND DEVICES 



* 



Your Special Requirements Will Receive 
Careful Attention 



(28) MUSCOLJUAN 



Compliments of 

The Cambridge Roofing Co. 

Cambridge, Ohio 



MU SCOLJU AN 



(29) 




(30) 



MU SCOLJU AN 



Here is your opportunity to insure against 
embarrassing errors in spelling, pronunci- 
ation and choice of words. Know 
the meaning of puzzling war terms. In- 
crease your efficiency, which results in 
power and success. 

WEBSTER'S 
NEW INTERNATIONAL 
DICTIONARY is an all-knowing teach- 
er, a universal question answerer, 
made to meet your needs. It is in 
daily use by hundreds of thousands of 

successful men and women the world over. 

400,000 Words. 2700 Pages. 6000 Illustrations. 

12,000 Biographical Entries. 

30,000 Geographical Subjects. 

GRAND PRIZE, (Highest Award) 

Panama-Pacific Exposition. 

REGULAR and INDIA-PAPER Editions. ■ 
Write for Specimen 
Pages. Free Pocket 
Maps if you name 
this paper. 

G.&C. 

MERRIAM 

CO., 

Springfield, 
Mass., 
U. S. A. 

B^wf -^^.*-^^r| •••••■■■•■■■•■■■•• «»>Vx>*i^SiSE»^^t fnt 




BOYER BROS. 

For 

Traveling Bags 

Suit Cases 

Athletic and Sporting 

Goods 

New Concord, Ohio 

Let us express our 

appreciation of 

Muskingum Boys and 

Girls 

Jos. Smith 

Optometrist and Optician 
Cambridge, Ohio 



BLAIR'S BARBER SHOP 

HAIR CUTTING 

MASSAGING 

SHAVING 

Dry Cleaning' and Pressing' 

All Pressing done on the 
Hoffman Steam Press 



Phone 108 



17 East Main St. 



NEW CONCORD, OHIO 



MU SCOLJU AN 



(31) 



^ ^ 1 • 1 CM ^ e cater *° P ar ticular 

bmart owlish bnoes ?*?£»■??"** 

*s foot-fitters take pains 

to fit your feet correctly and we carry the narrow widths, correct 
lasts and the newest leathers. Many sport models will be in demand 
this season. We invite you to call for your next buy. We take great 
pleasure in showing our shoes. rr\ i i 

1 urnbaugh 

Cambridge 



DR. H. L. IRWIN 
Dentist 

NEW CONCORD, OHIO 
No. 5 College Place 



SAM NOBLE 



for 

LADIES' AND GENTS' FUR- 
NISHINGS, SHOE- 
WEAR, ETC. 

New Concord, Ohio 



"I'll make it or bust," said the shoestring, as it felt itself 
being tightened. 



"Now don't leave a turn unstoned," said Cam to the road- 
workers. 



"Just because we believe in eating clubs at Muskingum, don't 
think you are privileged to chew tooth-picks where you will." 



Artist (to prospective customer) — "Fond of pictures?" 
Patron — "You bet; seldom miss a night." 



(32) 



MU SCOLJU AN 




Q>, J\. wo;c, zXryotograpty^r 



Just a few more wrinkles on this homely dome, 
Just the same old mop to brush and comb, 

And there is still the same old pep, 

Same old briskness in the step, 
And the frowns that wont come off are still at 
home. 



Just a little more, I hope, of kindliness, 
Just a little less impatience under stress, 

And the same old steam is there 

Yielding not to wear and tear 
As these lines to old Muskingum I address. 



MUSCOLJUAN 



(33) 



Wm. Lilienthal & Son 

116 East 8th St. 
Opp. Court House 

CAMBRIDGE, OHIO 




OFFICE SUPPLIES 

LOOSE LEAF DEVICES 

BOOK BINDING 

"AU-Steel" Filing Cabinets 
and Safes 



C. V. CAIN 

Real Estate 

and 
Insurance 

Farm and City Properties 
New Concord, 0. 



"Your teeth are like the stars" he said 

Her eyes grew very bright. 
"Your teeth are like the stars" he said 

"They all come out at night." 

Riddle : What is the difference between the son-of-a-gun and 
the pop of a pistol? 

If you are in need of divorces at a reasonable rate we suggest 
Reno, Nev. Best on the market. 



The Cambridge Clothing Co. 

STEIN-BLOCH, FASHION PARK, MICHAELS STERN CO., 

STYLEPLUS 
Clothes for Young Men 

Stetson, Schoeble, Young Bros. Hats 

Manhattan and Emery Shirts 



(34) 



MUSCOLJUAN 




MU SCOLJU AN 



(35) 




M. R. SHAPIRO 

Leading 
Eyesight Specialist 

Corner Third and Main, Up Stairs 
ZANESVILLE, OHIO 



The only one in Southeastern Ohio who 
grinds your glasses from raw material. Any 
glasses duplicated from the smallest piece 
on very short notice with great accuracy. 

Any Student Can Have Their Broken Glasses Duplicated 

for One-Half Price. 



Bread, Rolls, Pastry 



Our Up-to-Date Bakery 
is now capable of giv- 
ing better service to 
our patrons. 

SPECIAL ORDERS 

Given Our Special At- 
tention. 



WILSON BAKERY 

19 East Main 
NEW CONCORD, OHIO 



We Are Cambridge's 

Most Exclusive 

Shop 

for 

LADIES' AND MISSES' 
READY TO WEAR 

Everything for the Woman of 
Good Taste 

Where Correct Style Meets 
Popular Prices 

Money Cheerfully Refunded 

^yalClqakG 



woajc/vs gooo clothes 



731 Wheeling Avenue 
Cambridge, Ohio 



(36) 



MUSCOLJUAN 




wan. 
Lii\ei\ 



A writing paper that passes all col- 
lege requirements. 

For thirty years made in one bright 
white shade out of carefully selected 
linen rags, making it especially suit- 
able for note book, thesis or personal 
stationery paper. 

For sale at your stationers in any 
form you wish. 

Dress up your work by using Swan 
Linen. 

THE CENTRAL OHIO PAPER GO. 

Toledo Columbus Cleveland 



A young man who had just be- 
come engaged had an amazingly 
large mouth, which, wnen he smiled, 
seemed to spread out over his whole 
face. At the urging of his new be- 
trothed sweetheart he went to speak 
to her father at once. "I — I have 
come, Mr. Barrett," he said, begin- 
ning to smile at once with the ut- 
most geniality in order to cover up 
his embarrassment, "to — to ask for 
your daughter's hand. I — I — ". 

"Excuse me," the father kindly in- 
terrupted, "but will you kindly close 
your mouth for a moment until I can 
see who you are?" 




Graduation Days Are Almost Here 

Our stock is new with Fancy Leather Classics, Memory Books, Poems, Auto- 
graph Albums. Houbigant's and Coty's Imported Perfumes and Toilet Waters, 
and a vast number of Dainty Gifts that will appeal to the graduate. 

McCLEARY'S DRUG STORE 



Below Street Car Office 



CAMBRIDGE, OHIO 



MUSCOLJUAN 



(37) 




(38) 



MU SCO L JUAN 



Make Our Store Your Head- 
quarters when in 
Cambridge 

Our Fountain Service Will 
Please You 

The Central Drug Store 

Wheeling Ave. and North 7th 
SAM SCHLUP REED CLARK 




(( )i|i \\k )\ 


Dr. Homer W. Castor 
Dentist 

Corner Main and Depot Sts. 
New Concord, Ohio 


Oil l|!( )! 




And When You Want Flowers 

Just Write, Telephone 

Telegraph or Call 

FRED W.ARNOLD, Florist 

Cambridge, Ohio 


DR. J. K. YOUNG 

Dentift 

CAMBRIDGE, OHIO 

Tel. 2272 

MUSKINGUM'S FRIEND 


Southeastern Ohio's Greatest Store 

Can Supply Your Every Need 

CAMBRIDGE, OHIO 


Muskingum Students Are Always Welcome at 

GUERNSEY DAIRY LUNCH 

MEALS, SHORT ORDERS, SPECIALTIES 

"The Sanitary Place to Eat" 
705 Wheeling Avenue CAMBRIDGE, OHIO 



MUSCOLJUAN 



(39) 



"The Greater Paper of Greater Muskingum" 



lacfe anb jftaggnta 

MUSKINGUM COLLEGE 
WEEKLY 





ALUMNI ! 

You can keep in close touch 
with your alma mater and its 
activities by sending your sub- 
scription to 

Fred Bell, Business Manager 



(40) 



M (J SCOLJU AN 




xlRe.st\t\-\er\ 



Sc=>T=3r-^< 



, ^■C^**^^^^* 



I 







^1 


'r^^SFjf -j&-> \m\ 



^>op>\S 



WB 


9 

• 








TVe Hx^ Jv-uwp 



M U SCO LJU AN 



(41) 



\ 





Wherever cold air is a part of 
the business — there the Lipman 
c»n make a saving over the use 
of ice. There is a Lipman 
machine in every desired size 
and price. 



ow Qipmati Tlutomatic 
Refrigeration Saves 



In American homes — and in thousands of industries 
where refrigeration is employed — the Lipman pays for 
itself by the many savings it makes. 

Food stays fresh indefinitely in the crisp-cold, DRY 
air from a Lipman. Health is protected — no spoilage — 
no dirty, unsanitary ice. End ice bills forever — in your 
home and in your business. Write for information — 
Learn what a Lipman will save for you. 

Lipman Refrigerator Car & Mfg. Co. 

BELOIT, WIS. 

^©"The Lipman Refrigerating Machine in this College was installed 
by The Wilkinson Co., Columbus, Ohio. 



AUTOMATIC REFRIGERATION 



(42) 



MUSCOLJ UAN 




M ■;•■«»: on TPuwoau 



Walk-Over Shoes for Every Occasion 

FOR MEN 
FOR WOMEN 

LLOYD & RUBY 



Powder, Rouge & Perfume 
Specialists 




Mary Crowe, Ruth Iseman, 
Ann LeBlanc & Co. 

Rue dc Novum Ad-um OOOOOO^jf 
Satisfaction Guaranteed or Money Refunded. 



The 
Kassels Korset Ko. 

KASSELS, OHIO 




Requests Mr. Bruder, Mr. Pollock 
and Mr. Hawkshaw Brownlee to 
call at their earliest convenience, as 
we need special "stream line" 
models for our new product which 
will be announced later. Watch 
this space. 



THE MORNING TIMES RECORDER 
THE EVENING SIGNAL 



Zanesville's Big Dailies. They Are Read by 30,000 Southeastern 
Ohio Families Every Day. 



MU SCOLJU AN 



(43) 



The 

C. & M. Amusement Co. 

Operating the 

Strand 

and 

New Colonial 

T. C. WEBER, Mgr. 

Home of Good Pictures and Road 
Shows 

CAMBRIDGE, OHIO 


ROY T. STEVENSON 

Travelers and Sporting 
Goods Store 

115-119 North Seventh St. 
Cambridge, Ohio 


J. H. McKINNEY & SON 

EVERYTHING 
IN HARDWARE 

NOTICE TO STUDENTS: 
Place to Buy Razor Blades" 

New Concord, O. 


Harry Nickol : (at the Co-Op.) I want to look at some mir- 
rors." 

Clerk: "Hand mirrors?" 

Harry: "No; some you can see your face in." 

Shorty : "I had an awful dream last night." 
Ken: "What was it?" 

Shorty: "I dreamed I was eating shredded wheat, and when 
I woke half the mattress was gone." 

Dot: "Let's start a secret society." 

Sara: "All right I know three secrets now." 



(44) 



MU SCOLJ U AN 



A Real 

Furniture 

Store 



THE HOPE 
COMPANY 

CAMBRIDGE, 
OHIO 




IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 

OUR HOME is or should be 
your greatest pride. Your 
home hours are hours of great- 
est joy and delight if your sur- 
roundings are cheery and beautiful. 
Neat, beautiful, comfortable and useful 
furniture need not be expensive. Fur- 
niture, if well selected and properly 
cared for, will serve many years. 
We furnish the home cemplete. Our 
lines are standard lines, purchased from 
houses with an established reputation. 
Our period dining room sets, our parlor 
suites and rugs, are especially selected 
to please the most critical buyer. 
Visit our store, corner of Ninth and 
Wheeling Avenue. 



Positive 


Comparative 


Superlative 


Dan Campbell 


Taller 


Tom Pollock 


Bald 


Albert Jones 


Prof. Patton 


Trotsky 


Crazier 


Job. 


Geo. Murdock 


Bob Morton 


Crankiest 


Lazy 


Dittmar 


Hank Caldwell 


Ralph Frost 


Husse> 


Most in love 



Dr. Kelsey : (in the middle of his favorite joke) "Did I ever 
tell the class this one before?" 
Class (in chorus) "Yes." 
Dr. Kelsey: "Well perhaps you can understand it this time." 



Bob G. : (on his way to O. W. U.) "Is this a fast train?" 

Conductor: "Yes, of course." 

Bob : "Well will you please see what it is fast to." 



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MU SCOLJU AN 



Ijam s Drug Store 

^e ^QXOAJL Store 

(Formerly the Wilson Drug Store) 

Prompt, Safe and Reliable Service 

Phone 2539 
Court House Corner CAMBRIDGE, O. 

Park's Garage 




Ford Cars, Trucks and Tractors 

Taxi Service. Rates Reasonable. 

J. M. PARK 

New Concord 



Delco ■ Light 



The Complete Electric 

Light and Power 

Plant 



SLATER &ST0CKUM 

Delco- Li £<ht Dealers 
"THE PRODUCT OF QUALITY" 



SLINGLUFFS 




Our Line of Sporting Goods and 
Kodak Supplies is Complete. 

Exclusive Spalding Agency. 

Slingluffs 
Victrola and Gift Store 

No. 730 Wheeling Avenue 
Cambridge, Ohio 



Concerning college football teams 

Too oft it comes 10 pass 
The man who's half-back in the field 

Is 'way back in his class. 



What is sadder than a man who 
looses his last friend? 

A man who works for his board 
and looses his appetite 



Caroline : "I have drawn all the 
bones in the skeleton." 

Toby: "You may draw your 
breath now." 



MU SCOLJU AN (47) 



Mail Pouch, Chris Kenneweg and Lucky Strike 

KNIGHTS OF THE ROAD 

Courses by Correspondence. Years of Experience 
is Our Reference. 

Practical Demonstrations of the New and Attractively Beautiful 

"KNICKERS" 

See Ralph Peacock or Murl Johnson 

AGENTS AND MODELS 

MESSRS. KETCHUM & SKINUM 

Dealers in 

Cannons, Tooth Brushes, Diamonds, Ladies' Bicycles, Dried 
Apples, Chewing Gum, Brass Knuckles, Bibles, Etc. 

We Call For and Deliver. Tell Us Your Wants. "Everything front Soup to Nuts." 

On the Corner Across from the Court House Beside the Jail 

Just Around the Round House 

NEW CONCORD, OHIO, "THE PLACE TO LIVE AND LET LIVE" 



We have within our domains the following up-to-date and modern con- 
veniences arrd improvements : 

A nice newly painted and beautifully decorated Ford Fire Department ; 
"give us a chance to show our worth." 

A Police force with polished buttons, cap, n'everything "watch out, lead 
is cheap." 

A Tomb-stone factory; latest lettering, designs, prices. "Leave us your 
order before you leave." 

A real jug with lock and key. "We are proud to say that only one of the 
two prisoners admitted this year, escaped." 

A unique water-works system ; it wets the ground from below. "You 
never need a sprinkling hose, it's automatic." 

A real electric light plant that saves you money. "On at six, off at twelve." 

A lake or sometimes called the "ocean". Modern in every respect. "We 
fish not neither do we swim." 

A chicken and egg dispensary. "The original bird, the first bad egg." 

We will also have a public play-ground by the time any one around here 
will b( foolish enough to play. As it is we are the most modern town between 
Cambridge and Zanesville. And as a special inducement to ncwlyweds, we 
will furnish you free sites. 

— New Concord Board of Domestic Tranquility. 




The Callihan & Stottlemire Co. 

Printers 

Cambridge, Ohio.